Update From The God Himself - Dr. Takashi Tsuji

Pls_NW-1

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In other words, moving an occipital hair to the top of the scalp doesn't change the fact that it's resistant to miniaturization.
So they pretty much know by their own research that hair restoration with multiplication will clear Androgenetic Alopecia out!? That's satisfying and terrifying at the same time... Cool!
 

Keratinpro

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So they pretty much know by their own research that hair restoration with multiplication will clear Androgenetic Alopecia out!? That's satisfying and terrifying at the same time... Cool!
Wait what do you mean clear Androgenetic Alopeicia out, I'm confused lol
 

Roeysdomi

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In other words, moving an occipital hair to the top of the scalp doesn't change the fact that it's resistant to miniaturization.
There plenty of evidence that even the the hairs from the donor zone thinned in a matter of 2-3 years after the transplant . A time period that way faster to thinned rather then if it would never been extract from donor zone.
 

trialAcc

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There plenty of evidence that even the the hairs from the donor zone thinned in a matter of 2-3 years after the transplant . A time period that way faster to thinned rather then if it would never been extract from donor zone.
That's probably because they are being taken from areas where the person was already prone to miniaturization (ie the NW5-6 zone) and then get blasted by scalp DHT plus shock damage on move. Even with FUT, I see strip scars in the NW6 zone on the sides all the time.
 
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coolio

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Hang around the transplant world for long enough and you hear plenty of those reports. Transplanted hairs thinning and donor area thinning. It's not a consistent thing but it definitely happens. Severe baldness takes no prisoners. The "safe zone" is not 100% safe, it's just being hurt less severely.

Some guys even report their transplanted hairs thinning faster than the rest of the donor hair it came from. It's not unheard-of.

The guys who got early plug grafts (like 4mm chunks) used to report a "donuting" problem where the center of the grafts would bald out compared to the perimeter. I don't think that has ever been explained very well. Just catch-all explanations like "reduced circulation due to scarring". IMO the phenomenon seemed too specific for that to cover it.
 

Roeysdomi

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That's probably because they are being taken from areas where the person was already prone to miniaturization (ie the NW5-6 zone) and then get blasted by scalp DHT plus shock damage on move. Even with FUT, I see strip scars in the NW6 zone on the sides all the time.
Nope im taking about the safe one the real donor zone.
 

trialAcc

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Nope im taking about the safe one the real donor zone.
Then they have dupa/retrograde or another type of hair loss that extends to the new follicles like a scarring alopecia that was never treated. This isn't a one size fits all.
 

Joxy

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Dr. Tsuji is planning to put hair regeneration in clinical practise around 2026.

This is his last interview done 2 weeks ago for japanese newspaper:


Like I understand he is creating new management team (probably new company) and they will looking for investments to start clinical trials.
 

badnewsbearer

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from the article:
In June 2020, we also obtained the necessary approval for clinical studies. We are finally at the stage. However, an unexpected pitfall awaited here.

The venture company Organ Technologies, which was supposed to mass-produce and supply the "seeds" of hair follicles, failed to raise 2 billion yen in funding and was forced to suspend operations.

If it becomes a legal arrangement as it is, patents will be lost. So Mr. Tsuji took over the debt of Organ Corporation and completed the private liquidation.

Now, we are drawing up a blueprint to assemble a new management team, raise funds, conduct clinical research, and start free medical care using “seeds” from fiscal 2026.

“Clinical research for practical application requires the most money. Failure to raise funds is a direct hit from the corona crisis, but regenerative medicine for hair and teeth is not a life-threatening treatment in the first place, so clinical research In that case, it hurts that there is no public research funding.Actually, there is a high possibility that it will be the starting point for regenerative medicine research on various organs,” laments Mr. Tsuji.

I think people went totally retarded on this forum about tsuji and pointing him as this villain who is a fraud trying to deceive people when in reality he is reputable researcher at one of the top institutes in the world and foremost a scientist and not a business man. people always go become super weird here attacking researchers, finding out their phone numbers and calling them actually expecting a reply(who would lets be real do that in any other setting?) same with stemson. additionally, he is working on other aspects of regenerative medicine on the side of this like tooth regeneration and skins/other organs etc if you look at his publishing record.

furthermore, he is absolutely right about the fact that it is difficult to receive so much funding for a condition that is not life threatening. 2020 was the year covid hit so his explanation for why things went down and not according to plan makes sense and is justifiable.

I mean it says it right there, they actually went the way and applied for trials and organ technologies failed them and it was hard to burden. I hope they can get the funding, still think tsujis approach is easier to implement then stemson with current technological possibilities and especially easier to role out for mass production as long as IPSC mass manufacturing has not been figured out
 

Joxy

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The organoid project​

We’re entering an era where developmental biologists alone can’t solve forthcoming organoid challenges. The Organoid Project is a consortium that brings together RIKEN researchers and external collaborators to tackle organoid challenges and find real-world applications. In addition to developmental biologists, the Organoid Project includes researchers and technicians with expertise in areas such as microdevices, 3D printing, biomaterials and bioinformatics. This positions us uniquely to become a world-class base for generating organs in 3D.
Research under the Organoid Project spans the four key phases that take us from basic research to real-world applications: research on the self-organization mechanisms in stem cells; designing organoids; long-term culture and maturation; and optimization for applications.
Developmental biologist Mitsuru Morimoto and I work on the earlier phases of this process at RIKEN’s Kobe campus. Here, Morimoto’s team has succeeded in developing human lung alveoli organoids in the lab, which are now being used to model and develop treatments for lung diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, a scarring of the lungs.
His team has also elucidated the cell–cell communication signaling in the foregut, the top end of the esophagus, the stomach, and a portion of the duodenum, which is the embryonic origin of the trachea and esophagus. They have used these findings to develop tracheal cartilage tissue from human pluripotent cells. His group is now collaborating with the Center for Stem Cell and Organoid Medicine (CuSTOM) at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in the United States to create a multiple organoid system that replicates the respiratory organs and esophagus.
Meanwhile, my team has established a method for generating kidney and bladder organoids from human induced pluripotent (iPS) cells. The kidney organoids have all the components of a nephron, the functional unit of the kidney. The bladder organoids exhibit a barrier function that holds urine in a way similar to the bladder, and we have also been able to replicate the muscle layers surrounding the bladder, which help hold and release urine.
However, a new frontier for organ regeneration is to replicate entire organ systems instead of standalone organs. From a surgical point of view, transplanting a whole urinary tract system instead of a kidney organoid alone could increase the likelihood of a transplant being successful. My team is working to connect organoids of the kidney, bladder and ureter, which connect the kidneys to the urinary bladder, to replicate the urinary system.
A challenge is that the urinary system connects organs, tissues and cells derived from two of three types of cell layers, called germ layers, formed in the third week of human embryonic development. The relevant cells here are from the endoderm—which develop into the inner linings of the body, such as the digestive system and bladder—and from the mesoderm, which develop into the kidney, muscles, and red and white blood cells, among other things. The connections at the kidneys and bladder are a rare point where these two types of tissues connect, and replicating this connection would be a major feat.

Research by Takashi Tsuji of RIKEN BDR and Masayo Takahashi—formerly at RIKEN and now an external collaborator at Kobe City Eye Hospital—is closer to real-world applications. Tsuji’s team has developed a groundbreaking method, called the organ germ method, which uses organ-inducing epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells to replicate organogenesis, which is the growth and differentiation of tissues into organs during embryo development. In mice, his team has succeeded using this method to regenerate fully functional teeth, hair follicles and the salivary and lacrimal glands.

Using pluripotent stem cells, Tsuji’s team has also generated organoids of the pituitary gland, salivary gland and 3D integumentary system, a skin system that includes hair follicles and sebaceous glands. He is now focusing on bringing the functional regeneration of teeth and hair follicles to world-first human clinical trials.
 

Joxy

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Organizer: Mitsuru Morimoto, Minoru Takasato, Takashi Tsuji (RIKEN BDR, Japan)
Takanori Takebe, James M. Wells, Aaron M. Zorn (CuSTOM, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, USA)
 
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