My theory for Male Pattern Baldness, care to poke some holes | Page 2 | HairLossTalk Forums

My theory for Male Pattern Baldness, care to poke some holes

Discussion in 'Men's General Hair Loss Discussions' started by frailstar, Aug 27, 2007.

  1. frailstar

    frailstar Established Member

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    I agree. T. Colin Campbell does have some form of male pattern baldness, but he is in his 70s, hair thins eventually. Also, makes you wonder at what age he adopted a vegan diet. I don't recall after reading the book. His male pattern baldness doesn't look severe especially for someone in their 70s. Could male pattern baldness have been prevented even more had he started earlier in life? We don't know. Also I'm not seeing the male pattern baldness in his son, he has a healthy head of hair. I have the book with a pic of both of them on the cover and his hair looks great.

    As for every physician. We aren't discussing them. I'm only speaking about those that advocate a vegan whole foods diet.
     
  2. docj077

    docj077 Senior Member

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    Actually, his son is balding. It's quite evident if you find a picture of him. Also, when you defend yourself, learn to look at the whole picture. I mentioned that little tidbit about the physicians and researchers, because it's very important to realize that what is preached by many physicians doesn't seem to work for them either.
     
  3. frailstar

    frailstar Established Member

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    Actually, his son is balding. It's quite evident if you find a picture of him. Also, when you defend yourself, learn to look at the whole picture. I mentioned that little tidbit about the physicians and researchers, because it's very important to realize that what is preached by many physicians doesn't seem to work for them either.[/quote:db5e0]

    Campbell doesn't claim that his diet helps male pattern baldness, just prevent cancer and heart disease. I don't want anyone to think I'm implying his book talks about male pattern baldness, because it doesn't.

    Do you have a picture of his son? I wasn't able to find another picture of him, please link to it, just have the one on the book sleeve and he has no frontal hair loss, don't know about the back of his head.
     
  4. retropunk

    retropunk Established Member

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    Re: My theory for Male Pattern Baldness, care to poke some h

    I thought Native Americans and Inuit had a lower rate of male pattern baldness. Traditionally, Inuits have a high meat, low-carb diet and didn't suffer from some of the same ailments from consuming a 'Westernized' diet.

    Simply put, I think it's the crappy genes. Diet is probably a factor, but only if you're deficient in protein, iron, zinc, or biotin.
     
  5. docj077

    docj077 Senior Member

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    All you have to do is look him up on Google. He's receding. A diet that helps cancer and heart disease won't necessarily help male pattern baldness. Those diseases are "associated", but that doesn't mean that they totally influence each other. Their associations are more genetic than they are environmental.
     
  6. Whyatt

    Whyatt Established Member

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    I recently took a look at an old, damaged, pre-WWII movieclip from Japan. It was restored but quality...still bad. I was a bit surprised cos several people seen in that movie was balding.

    Just a side note.
     
  7. michael barry

    michael barry Senior Member

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    it never ceases to amaze me that so many people simply f*****g refuse to believe that their genetics are the reason they are balding.




    I have two uncles with full heads of hair in their fifties. They have lousy diets, are both overweight, and neither excercises other than normal walking. The old Asiatic diet full of soya and green tea might have slowed balding because of anti-androgens in those foodstuffs, but thats it.



    YOUR HAIRGENES SUCK. GET OVER IT. USE TREATMENTS AND WAIT FOR A CURE>
     
  8. s.a.f

    s.a.f Senior Member

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    No more needs to be said, anyone who disagrees is in denial and will have to accept it sooner or later.
     
  9. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    Interesting...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ainu_people

    [​IMG]
     
  10. michael barry

    michael barry Senior Member

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  11. michael barry

    michael barry Senior Member

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    Most of the anthropologists that I know seem to agree in consider them belonging to the leucoderm group. Possibly the thesis more guessed right on the origin of the Ainu it is the one what consider them as having Continental or Siberian origin (Biasutti attributed them an australoid origin, other Hindu as Guifrida-Ruggeri, some americans an oceanic origin etc.) You can admit the existence in Siberia, in a very old time, of a white-leucoderm mass little differed that, step by step, it would have been dispersed by the mongolic expansion. In that moment it is when the Ainu would have settled in Japan; coming from Korea, they would have advanced from South to North. This people, in roads of complete disappearance, constitutes, because, the only relic of a archaic leucoderm population disappeared time ago. This is what classic anthropology till now agreed about the Ainu people but it would be interesing to know what genetics have to say. Any idea?

    Hooton has written on them: "The hairy Ainu, aborigines of Japan and now restricted in distribution to the northern part of Japan and its islands, are generally regarded as the remnant of an ancient, brunet white or brown stock which in former times may have extended straight across Asia into European Russia. This short, dolichocephalic or mesocephalic people is notable for the profuseness of growth of its body hair and especially for the heavy beards of the males. Obviously the Ainu have undergone a considerable dilution of their blood by recent admixture with Mongoloid strains, most apparent in the females. But the pure Ainu type, as exhibited in many males, is distinctly of the "White" variety in features and even in pigmentation. Many Ainus are almost indistinguisable from bearded Russian peasants, who perhaps carry a good proportion of the same blood. An even more remarkable resemblance, although less pronounced, is that which the Ainu bear to the natives of Australia in their large brow-ridges, depressed nasal roots, and general hairiness. Some writers consider this a mere coincidence, but I am inclined to attribute it to the common posession of an archaich White racial element which is very strong in the Ainu, perhaps almost pure, aside from recent Mongoloid admixture, but in the case of the Australians is heavily overlaid with a Tasmanian admixture".

    Ainu examples:




    About what you say regarding the Atlanto-Mediterranids I did not find any clear information from anthropological books but in my experience they tend to have more hair in general.
    __________________
    "With the miscegenation vary as much the form as the essence of the nations. The new foreign hereditary patrimony that circulates in the new popular organism, acts from now in the variability of the physical and psychic features of the group, from the more ordinary phenotypic and tenuous racial characteristics untill the highest spiritual capacities".

    ILSE SCHWIDETZKY, Grundzüge der Völkerbiologie.
     
  12. Armando Jose

    Armando Jose Senior Member My Regimen

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    http://www.historyillustrated.com/texts ... ook26.html
    Quotations:

    Ethnologists accredit the Ainu with being one of the most interesting members of the human family. No other man is so hairy as he
    They are called the hairy people and are the primitives of Japan.
    The Ainu never wash, brush or comb the hair.

    Very interesting issue.

    In the photograph I don't see common baldness among them. It is possible a little frontal recession in the woman at left but I don't be sure.

    Armando
     
  13. frailstar

    frailstar Established Member

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    Actually, his son is balding. It's quite evident if you find a picture of him. Also, when you defend yourself, learn to look at the whole picture. I mentioned that little tidbit about the physicians and researchers, because it's very important to realize that what is preached by many physicians doesn't seem to work for them either.[/quote:ffcb5]

    Campbell doesn't claim that his diet helps male pattern baldness, just prevent cancer and heart disease. I don't want anyone to think I'm implying his book talks about male pattern baldness, because it doesn't.

    Do you have a picture of his son? I wasn't able to find another picture of him, please link to it, just have the one on the book sleeve and he has no frontal hair loss, don't know about the back of his head.[/quote:ffcb5]

    All you have to do is look him up on Google. He's receding. A diet that helps cancer and heart disease won't necessarily help male pattern baldness. Those diseases are "associated", but that doesn't mean that they totally influence each other. Their associations are more genetic than they are environmental.[/quote:ffcb5]

    I did a search for his son and did not find a pic of him. His father was easier to find and he looks just like he does in the picture on the sleeve of the book. Maybe you think you are seeing his son but it's not him.
     
  14. frailstar

    frailstar Established Member

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    Re: My theory for Male Pattern Baldness, care to poke some h

    That's interesting about the Native Americans and Eskimos. Did they consume a lot of milk. Maybe it's the absence of dairy in their diet and the high concentrations of omegas. Maybe it's not the meat that causes male pattern baldness.
     
  15. frailstar

    frailstar Established Member

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    I'm not saying genes don't play a role. You misunderstand me. Genes play a role in heart disease and cancer too but you don't see me surrendering and eating whole milk, meat and refined flour. I'm saying that diet could over ride your genetic predisposition, just like it's proven you can with cancer and heart disease. Would you rather play dumb, eat crappy cancer causing foods and get cancer / heart disease and then have to go through treatment? Or just prevent it through diet in the first place. What you are suggesting is exactly what's wrong with American's now. We rely on pills to fix everything and pay zero attention what's going into our mouth.

    The fact that my male pattern baldness theory seems crazy isn't surprising. Shockingly, some people are still debating if a whole foods, dairy & meat free diet can prevent cancer and heart disease.
     
  16. frailstar

    frailstar Established Member

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    hmm they ate a lot of fish like the Eskimos.
     
  17. Bryan

    Bryan Senior Member
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    BTW, Dr. Roger Williams (a world-famous scientist and biochemist...he's the one who actually discovered pantothenic acid, gave folic acid its name, and did original work with numerous other vitamins and dietary factors) felt that milk helps protect against heart disease. He recommended that whole milk be consumed, as an excellent part of any diet.
     
  18. Nathaniel

    Nathaniel Experienced Member

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    Latin american natives eat a lot of dairy and have nearly perfect hair. Take a stroll through Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Costa Rica....Tons of men with perfect hair and they consume a lot of dairy and high-meat diets.
     
  19. IBM

    IBM Senior Member

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    Nathaniel nice avatar. Who are they?
     
  20. frailstar

    frailstar Established Member

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    Found this

    An interesting epidemiological study was done in Japan about 8 years ago. It simply compared the incidence of male pattern baldness in rural Japan and urban Japan.

    It was noted that the incidence on male pattern baldness in urban Japan was 4 times higher that that of rural Japan. The author, Dr. Inabi, hypothesized that diet played a major role. In urban Japan, the city dweller have essentially gone to a western diet, meaning more meat, dairy products, and fast foods, not to mention the stress. In rural Japan, he studied that they eat a traditional macrobiotic diet consisting mainly of fish, grains and vegetables, high in 3 and 6 fatty acids.

    The incidence of male pattern baldness amongst the urban Japanese is only slightly less than what it is in the U.S., and among Japanese who have been living in the U.S. for more than one generation, it is identical to other ethnic groups. In Japan, prior to WWII, and its subsequent urbanization, male pattern baldness was virtually unknown and extremely rare. This study sheds a drastically different light on how diet and environment can impact genetic triggers and the predispositions.
     

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