Involvement Of Mechanical Stress In Androgenetic Alopecia | Von Mises 2d Analysis Models

Armando Jose

Senior Member
My Regimen
It could be considered as an scalp relaxer this machine?


vacuum_hair.jpg
 

VonMises

Member
My Regimen
Von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” (image scaled 35%) vs. scalp overview of a typical baldness pattern before (left image) and after approx. 1 year of minoxidil usage (right image). Horizontal lines are added between the Von Mises stress model and the real example to section up into zones which are used for model validation. It appears that zone 2 is a critical zone where less regrowth is occurring and also both sides in zone 1.

upload_2018-7-6_16-23-55.png
 

VonMises

Member
My Regimen
Von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” (image scaled 35%) vs. scalp overview of a typical baldness pattern before (left image) and after approx. 7 months of minoxidil and finasteride usage (right image). Horizontal lines are added between the Von Mises stress model and the real example to section up into zones which are used for model validation. It appears that the sides in zone 1 and zone 2 are critical exhibiting less or no regrowth.
upload_2018-7-6_16-54-2.png
 
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VonMises

Member
My Regimen
Von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” (image scaled 35%) vs. anastomotic network of the scalp arteries vs. scalp overview of a typical baldness pattern before (left image) and after approx. 7 months of minoxidil and finasteride usage (right image). Horizontal lines are added between the Von Mises stress model and the real example to section up into zones which are used for model validation. It appears that the sides in zone 1 and zone 2 are critical showing less or no regrowth, even though these areas appear to have an ok network- and flow capacity of scalp arteries given the blood flow improving characteristics of minoxidil.
upload_2018-7-6_17-9-55.png
 
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VonMises

Member
My Regimen
Von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” (image scaled 35%) vs. scalp overview of a typical baldness pattern before (left image) and after approx. 1 year of minoxidil and finasteride usage (right image). Horizontal lines are added between the Von Mises stress model and the real example to section up into zones which are used for model validation. It appears that the sides in zone 1 and zone 2 are critical where there is less or no regrowth.
upload_2018-7-6_19-59-1.png
 

VonMises

Member
My Regimen
Von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” (image scaled 35%) vs. anastomotic network of the scalp arteries vs. scalp overview of a typical baldness pattern before (left image) and after approx. 1 year of minoxidil and finasteride usage (right image). Horizontal lines are added between the Von Mises stress model and the real example to section up into zones which are used for model validation. It appears that the sides in zone 1 and zone 2 are critical areas showing less or no regrowth, even though these areas appear to have an ok network and flow capacity of scalp arteries given the blood flow improving characteristics of minoxidil, and that the blood contains lower DHT levels due to finasteride. The critical areas in zone 1 and zone 2, observed in the real example, are the areas which have the highest tension in the Von Mises stress model.
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WHLX

Member
My Regimen
Interesting, but many missing pieces, including how reduction of blood flow (which goes against what you said) grows hair too:

https://www.hairlosscure2020.com/ligature-of-the-arteries-of-the-scalp-to-prevent-further-hair-loss/

Is this simple due reduced DHT due reduced blood flow? but isn't DHT fabricated within follicles as well?

Anyway, you seem to explain everything with scalp tension being the ultimate culprit of hairloss right? So in your model, reducing scalp tension mechanically is the ultimate cure? Im just not sure about that.

What about dermarolling? would puncturing the scalp mitigate this supposed tension? perhaps Von Misses' application could include simmulating the typically 1.5mm holes from a dermaroller in the scalp?

About the device, indeed extremely expensive, but it's a one time investment, all things considered it may be worth it, compared to botox which requires maintainance, it's much more expensive long term. The big problem: That device seems like a huge liability in terms of comfort. There's no way you can be wearing that while sleeping... and ideally we would need 24/7 exposure to that force to counteract the tension which I assume it's inflicted 24/7 as DHT and other tension-generating phenomena is constantly happening. How do we solve this? Botox seem to be the only thing that could give us 24/7 protection, but again, too expensive, and im yet to see results as good as this one:

https://www.hairlosstalk.com/intera...inasteride-results-7-mo-treatment-pics.44087/

Or this one, with only 6 months of finasteride!

https://www.hairlosstalk.com/intera...-with-finasteride-after-6-months-pics.107836/

I will be impressed If I see results like these with the botox and or STR device. But in any case, if someone wants to buy the device and try it out, please let us know. It would be insanely interesting to see what exposure to a couple of hours can do, which is what all we can aim for, since we can't be wearing that thing at work, in public, or in bed, I assume it would need to be used while you are sitting at the computer at home and so on. Also to measure how comfortable the thing is. Please someone that can afford it right now buy it and let us know. Im specially interested to see if it mitigates scalp itch/scalp discomfort of sorts. Do you also think that reducing tension mechanically could help mitigating these? my scalp always feels weird.

Thanks Pain.

I don't believe Finasteride or the ligature of arteries are counter-arguments to Rob's paper. Rob acknowledges that Finasteride works well for a small number of people. He just disagrees with the Androgen Hypothesis and the role of DHT.

I don't believe restricting blood flow is the answer either. This likely works because it restricts serum testosterone and the creation of DHT. The author of the link you posted stated the obvious; Long-term blood flow restriction may result in necrosis.

Many studies show that blood flow, nutrients and oxygen (carried in red blood cells) play a role in hair-loss and growth. In the STR paper, the researchers believed the increase in superficial blood flow may account for the results:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/11/scalp-relaxer-study/

preview-scalp-relaxer-study-6.jpg


Anecdotally (Yes, anecdotes are often meaningless), you can find multiple accounts of onion juice and head stands promoting hair-growth in the NW2 - 7 region. As a layman, I believe that's probably because of increased blood flow.

If we can (a) reduce mechanical tension (b) improve the quality of our blood (inc. trace nutrients and red blood cell count) and (c) stimulate blood flow with these interventions perhaps we can make significant strides forward.
 
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nohairnolife

Established Member
My Regimen
Von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” (image scaled 35%) vs. scalp overview of a typical baldness pattern before (left image) and after approx. 1 year of minoxidil usage (right image). Horizontal lines are added between the Von Mises stress model and the real example to section up into zones which are used for model validation. It appears that zone 2 is a critical zone where less regrowth is occurring and also both sides in zone 1.

View attachment 92523
Wait this is a before and after of a dude using Minoxidil? Is this true?
 

Armando Jose

Senior Member
My Regimen
Thanks Pain.

I don't believe Finasteride or the ligature of arteries are counter-arguments to Rob's paper. Rob acknowledges that Finasteride works well for a small number of people. He just disagrees with the Androgen Hypothesis and the role of DHT.

I don't believe restricting blood flow is the answer either. This likely works because it restricts serum testosterone and the creation of DHT. The author of the link you posted stated the obvious; Long-term blood flow restriction may result in necrosis.

Many studies show that blood flow, nutrients and oxygen (carried in red blood cells) play a role in hair-loss and growth. In the STR paper, the researchers believed the increase in superficial blood flow may account for the results:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/11/scalp-relaxer-study/

View attachment 93270

Anecdotally (Yes, anecdotes are often meaningless), you can find multiple accounts of onion juice and head stands promoting hair-growth in the NW2 - 7 region. As a layman, I believe that's probably because of increased blood flow.

If we can (a) reduce mechanical tension (b) improve the quality of our blood (inc. trace nutrients and red blood cell count) and (c) stimulate blood flow with these interventions perhaps we can make significant strides forward.

In the study you cited
"Topical minoxidil applications for male-pattern baldness have been reported to cause hair growth with excelent results and it has been suggested that the mechanism throught wich Minoxidil generates hair regrowth it itsvasodilation effect"
EXCELENT RESULTS...... Are we agree?
 

inmyhead

Experienced Member
In the study you cited
"Topical minoxidil applications for male-pattern baldness have been reported to cause hair growth with excelent results and it has been suggested that the mechanism throught wich Minoxidil generates hair regrowth it itsvasodilation effect"
EXCELENT RESULTS...... Are we agree?

Also he said " Rob acknowledges that Finasteride works well for a small number of people. " Don't the real studies indicate like 80 percent success rate or something?
 

WHLX

Member
My Regimen
I've been reading your comments on the related galea thread. Thanks for introducing me to the word 'Pilosebaceous', Armando. This paper was published in 1991. That statement needs to be read in the context of the time.

Also he said " Rob acknowledges that Finasteride works well for a small number of people. " Don't the real studies indicate like 80 percent success rate or something?

I think you mean the % of people who have halted hair-loss through Finasteride? I believe the stat is less than 80%. I was replying to Pain's reference to hyper-responders; Most people don't sustain cosmetically significant regrowth from Finasteride.

Again, I'm not an expert. Rob proposes that DHT is an inflammatory response to mechanical tension. The onset of DHT in the scalp has a role in calcification, fibrosis and remodeling muscle tissue. So reducing DHT is helpful but presents a partial solution.
 
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infinitepain

Experienced Member
Thanks Pain.

I don't believe Finasteride or the ligature of arteries are counter-arguments to Rob's paper. Rob acknowledges that Finasteride works well for a small number of people. He just disagrees with the Androgen Hypothesis and the role of DHT.

I don't believe restricting blood flow is the answer either. This likely works because it restricts serum testosterone and the creation of DHT. The author of the link you posted stated the obvious; Long-term blood flow restriction may result in necrosis.

Many studies show that blood flow, nutrients and oxygen (carried in red blood cells) play a role in hair-loss and growth. In the STR paper, the researchers believed the increase in superficial blood flow may account for the results:

https://www.pdf-archive.com/2017/07/11/scalp-relaxer-study/

View attachment 93270

Anecdotally (Yes, anecdotes are often meaningless), you can find multiple accounts of onion juice and head stands promoting hair-growth in the NW2 - 7 region. As a layman, I believe that's probably because of increased blood flow.

If we can (a) reduce mechanical tension (b) improve the quality of our blood (inc. trace nutrients and red blood cell count) and (c) stimulate blood flow with these interventions perhaps we can make significant strides forward.

Isn't that what PRP does?

Also a) and b) would be covered by the STR device? STR reduces mechanical tension and apparently somehow stimulates blood flow too? along with minoxidil. This coupled with finasteride/dutasteride usage may make an impact. How does dermarolling fall in your model? Again, wouldn't help mitigate tension by creating these micro holes? The problem is it hurts like a mofo.

We need someone to buy the STR device and try it daily for a couple of hours to see if it does anything or not. Like I said before, ideally we would want 24/7 exposure to the forces created by the STR to counteract the constant tension of the scalp, but we can't wear the device all day for obvious reasons, and botox is discarded since we aren't millionaires. Our only hope is that STR device exposure for a couple hours daily is enough to make a cosmetic difference. If it doesn't, I guess we are fucked.
 

Armando Jose

Senior Member
My Regimen
STR also can make a mobilization of possible hardened and enrainced sebum inside scalp and pilosebaceous unit.
 

infinitepain

Experienced Member
STR also can make a mobilization of possible hardened and enrainced sebum inside scalp and pilosebaceous unit.

Would manual massage help? or perhaps one of these mechanical massage devices with 4 rotating pivots. In any case, they may not be strong enough compared to the STR device. Unfortunately the website is now online, so where do we get it ?
 

VonMises

Member
My Regimen
2D static analysis of von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” with added equal opposite force in the front:
upload_2018-7-17_22-10-41.png
 

VonMises

Member
My Regimen
2D static analysis of von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear” with added double opposite force in the front:
upload_2018-7-17_22-11-38.png
 

VonMises

Member
My Regimen
The musculoaponeurotic layer of the scalp showing the frontalis muscles vs. example of no baldness pattern vs. example of a typical baldness pattern vs. von Mises stress model “With half opposite force rear”. Solid lines are added to the frontalis muscles on the left image, these lines are overlayed the real examples. Circle indicates spacing between the top of the frontalis muscles and it can be seen that the real example with no baldness pattern is exhibiting a downward hairline in this area.
upload_2018-7-17_22-58-14.png
 
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