Stemson is going to use minipigs in the next stage of their hair cloning research

froggy7

Experienced Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
207
He's being realistic. Everyone else tries to hype themselves up saying they have a cure after growing hair in mice. Stemson is the only company taking hair cloning seriously.

I think $50-$100k is still possible. They're developing their solution with the intention of scaling which will definitely mean huge investments into R&D and equipment that they should be able to recoup from the velocity of treatments.
50-100k$ it would be avery goood price!
 

froggy7

Experienced Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
207
Only good news here is that Semson is still trying.
valuable news will be when they present the results of preclinical tests on pigs, everyone had money before them and no one provided anything
 

froggy7

Experienced Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
207
"This round of financing will be applied to advancing Stemson’s cell engineering platform, which involves bioengineered material and will be combined with robotic delivery as a novel solution for hair replacement, according to the release. It appears Stemson has theorized that the placement of its stem cell mixtures within scaffolding will be best handled by robots for precise insertion into scalp tissue. It’s also mentioned that Stemson is currently developing a human skin environment model implanted onto larger animals (likely a pig or miniature pig). This will allow Stemson to test out their implantation processes in an environment as similar to human as possible before starting an official clinical trial. Good stuff."

it looks like the pig trials haven't started yet
 

eeyore

Established Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
211
"This round of financing will be applied to advancing Stemson’s cell engineering platform, which involves bioengineered material and will be combined with robotic delivery as a novel solution for hair replacement, according to the release. It appears Stemson has theorized that the placement of its stem cell mixtures within scaffolding will be best handled by robots for precise insertion into scalp tissue. It’s also mentioned that Stemson is currently developing a human skin environment model implanted onto larger animals (likely a pig or miniature pig). This will allow Stemson to test out their implantation processes in an environment as similar to human as possible before starting an official clinical trial. Good stuff."

it looks like the pig trials haven't started yet
It's disappointing timeline wise with the pig trials but with this press release I'm more hyped for Stemson than ever as it shows how serious they are about actually curing hair loss. To me it looks like they're carefully developing their solution to be as robust and commercially viable as possible.
 

DuncanOP

Established Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
29
"This round of financing will be applied to advancing Stemson’s cell engineering platform, which involves bioengineered material and will be combined with robotic delivery as a novel solution for hair replacement, according to the release. It appears Stemson has theorized that the placement of its stem cell mixtures within scaffolding will be best handled by robots for precise insertion into scalp tissue. It’s also mentioned that Stemson is currently developing a human skin environment model implanted onto larger animals (likely a pig or miniature pig). This will allow Stemson to test out their implantation processes in an environment as similar to human as possible before starting an official clinical trial. Good stuff."

it looks like the pig trials haven't started yet
Thanks for sharing.

And whata hell. They test it on small animals successfully. Now they are wasting time trying to "mock" the human skin to improve the tests in big animals?( "development efforts are focused on developing an optimized solution for human skin structure environment in larger animal models.")

Lmao, I'm sure a high number of users will not care about test it.. damn governement laws.
 

FilthyFrancis

Established Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
481
Good news they attracted new investors. These people have much more information on the company (and are most likely more knowledgeable on biotech) than we do. If money keeps flowing, it means investors consider the risk benefit ratio worth it.

I wouldn't overthink his realistic statement. It's a challenge and he is simply acknowledging it. Better this than someone who promises the moon *cough*Tsuji*cough cough*
 

trialAcc

Senior Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
1,531
Leave it to a hairloss forum to decide that 15 million in early stage funding from massive biotech and VC firms can possibly be seen as a negative simply because the CEO admitted in a press release that what they are trying to accomplish is incredibly difficult.

People were willing to bet all their cope/hope on things like Tsuji (begging for dollars on twitter and wanting to charge you 700k USD to be in his trial), Replicel (entire firm valued less then this Series A alone), Histogen (entire firm valued under 10 million after raising tens of millions over a decade from no name investors) and dozens of other shitty products and companies over the years that had no where near the legitimacy or backing that this company does.

Keep in mind here that the private valuation of his firm is likely anywhere between 50 to 100 million now. The only other thing that's come around in the last 2~ decades that has the same legitimacy of this company/process is the recent HopeMed series B that put that company well into the hundreds of millions valuation wise. Recognize that this type of money doesn't flow into something like hairloss without serious potential and hype behind the science.
 

froggy7

Experienced Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
207
Leave it to a hairloss forum to decide that 15 million in early stage funding from massive biotech and VC firms can possibly be seen as a negative simply because the CEO admitted in a press release that what they are trying to accomplish is incredibly difficult.

People were willing to bet all their cope/hope on things like Tsuji (begging for dollars on twitter and wanting to charge you 700k USD to be in his trial), Replicel (entire firm valued less then this Series A alone), Histogen (entire firm valued under 10 million after raising tens of millions over a decade from no name investors) and dozens of other shitty products and companies over the years that had no where near the legitimacy or backing that this company does.

Keep in mind here that the private valuation of his firm is likely anywhere between 50 to 100 million now. The only other thing that's come around in the last 2~ decades that has the same legitimacy of this company/process is the recent HopeMed series B that put that company well into the hundreds of millions valuation wise. Recognize that this type of money doesn't flow into something like hairloss without serious potential and hype behind the science.
I also hope that this time this company will do it, but so far there are only words and no positive human trials
 

DuncanOP

Established Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
29
Leave it to a hairloss forum to decide that 15 million in early stage funding from massive biotech and VC firms can possibly be seen as a negative simply because the CEO admitted in a press release that what they are trying to accomplish is incredibly difficult.

People were willing to bet all their cope/hope on things like Tsuji (begging for dollars on twitter and wanting to charge you 700k USD to be in his trial), Replicel (entire firm valued less then this Series A alone), Histogen (entire firm valued under 10 million after raising tens of millions over a decade from no name investors) and dozens of other shitty products and companies over the years that had no where near the legitimacy or backing that this company does.

Keep in mind here that the private valuation of his firm is likely anywhere between 50 to 100 million now. The only other thing that's come around in the last 2~ decades that has the same legitimacy of this company/process is the recent HopeMed series B that put that company well into the hundreds of millions valuation wise. Recognize that this type of money doesn't flow into something like hairloss without serious potential and hype behind the science.
of course Stemson have credits and I'm not questioning its potential for the hair loss market or comparing them with these other ""scams""..

But I'm criticizing the purpose of the letter from the CEO. What is the reason of it?

Basically, he said (and everything are true) that baldness is a considerable problem, the solutions provided to it until now are disheartening, they are rising money to invest in the solution, but it is difficult to get it and they are just starting.

Neutral points:
- bla bla bla about problems of hair loss, emotional history and bad products at market until now.

Negative points:
1) They are just starting the pipeline
2) He didn't guarantee anything
3) Is hard to obtain the solution

Positive points:
1) They are rising money and are serious to try to provide a product to "cure" baldness (but I think we can compare this positive points with the "others". Every big player in this market are seriuous to bring hair loss cure, so, this point is not very useful)

For me, this letter was not a good choice, even for businesses logic. It would been better/interesting to just announced the partnership and written down advances of their current research.
Instead of publish this bad letter, which looks like a candlelight close to a darkness that itself brings
 

trialAcc

Senior Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
1,531
of course Stemson have credits and I'm not questioning its potential for the hair loss market or comparing them with these other ""scams""..

But I'm criticizing the purpose of the letter from the CEO. What is the reason of it?

Basically, he said (and everything are true) that baldness is a considerable problem, the solutions provided to it until now are disheartening, they are rising money to invest in the solution, but it is difficult to get it and they are just starting.

Neutral points:
- bla bla bla about problems of hair loss, emotional history and bad products at market until now.

Negative points:
1) They are just starting the pipeline
2) He didn't guarantee anything
3) Is hard to obtain the solution

Positive points:
1) They are rising money and are serious to try to provide a product to "cure" baldness (but I think we can compare this positive points with the "others". Every big player in this market are seriuous to bring hair loss cure, so, this point is not very useful)

For me, this letter was not a good choice, even for businesses logic. It would been better/interesting to just announced the partnership and written down advances of their current research.
Instead of publish this bad letter, which looks like a candlelight close to a darkness that itself brings
The letter he wrote just highlighted the difficultly of the challenge they are undertaking and built up the significance of what they are trying to achieve by emphasizing with the mass emotional toll that hairloss pushes onto people.

It's very possible they got delayed in the timing of their pre-clinical research but its very difficult to see the CEO standing there with a fresh 15m dollar check from a new biotech investor and think this could be a negative. They're also developing the robotics that will have this process quick, cheaper, and far more natural then most transplant surgeons could accomplish.
 

DuncanOP

Established Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
29
It's very possible they got delayed in the timing of their pre-clinical research but its very difficult to see the CEO standing there with a fresh 15m dollar check from a new biotech investor and think this could be a negative
Indeed, Stemson seems to care about trying to create a process that is financially viable for most people. And I didn't pay enough attention to this.

I still think the CEO letter could have been a little better, maybe providing time expectations or timeline details. But it's better than nothing, certainly. And you commented on its good points.
 

froggy7

Experienced Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
207
Indeed, Stemson seems to care about trying to create a process that is financially viable for most people. And I didn't pay enough attention to this.

I still think the CEO letter could have been a little better, maybe providing time expectations or timeline details. But it's better than nothing, certainly. And you commented on its good points.
it's good that they have solid financing and want to use the robot, we still do not know if the hair will be permanent, but probably by using other solutions it will be possible to achieve it? besides, stemson will produce the hair that someone wants, as long as is completely bald, which is a big plus
 

froggy7

Experienced Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
207

"We don’t know when exactly we’ll get into human clinical trials, but we’ve got a couple of years in front of us to really try to complete the R&D to the point where we have confidence and we’ll just have to see how we progress along that timeline,” Hamilton said. The preclinical work is currently being done in animal models that "can very closely approximate the human skin structure and environment," the CEO said."
 

DuncanOP

Established Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
29

"We don’t know when exactly we’ll get into human clinical trials, but we’ve got a couple of years in front of us to really try to complete the R&D to the point where we have confidence and we’ll just have to see how we progress along that timeline,” Hamilton said. The preclinical work is currently being done in animal models that "can very closely approximate the human skin structure and environment," the CEO said."
yes, as I said, that is one the negative points. He should be more specific, this vague sentence gives the impression that will take several years, which is disheartening.

My top 1 expectation about hair clone at the near future is Yokohama, because the approach of trying to clone hair cells using germ cells seems more feasible to me, rather than Stemson's approach of taking cells from the blood and differentiating them.
But maybe a big player enter in this area in the near future too, who knows?


I also find it a bit strange that they are focusing in techniques with robots instead of using all their blinds to perform a POC on humans.
A successful POC would certainly attract alot of investors, since no ones performed something like it yet.
 
Last edited:

DuncanOP

Established Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
29
Last edited:

froggy7

Experienced Member
My Regimen
Reaction score
207
“We don’t know when exactly we’ll get into human clinical trials, but we’ve got a couple of years in front of us to really try to complete the R&D to the point where we have confidence and we’ll just have to see how we progress along that timeline,” Hamilton said. The preclinical work is currently being done in animal models that “can very closely approximate the human skin structure and environment,” the CEO said.”
 
Top