Bayer Prolactin Receptor Antibody For Male And Female Pattern Hair Loss

Chads don't bald

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Other companies make promises, HMI makes clinical trials.

Yes. You have to go to the specified location every two weeks to receive an injection. You don't pay anything. You can't be on any other treatments, and you will likely need to have severe hair loss. Typically you have to be off other treatments for 6 months prior to the trial
Oh dang I wont really wanna get off finasteride tbh

Even though I believe this is a potential cure I don’t wanna risk it. Guess I’m paying full price lol

Plus my hair loss isn’t severe anyways
 

werefckd

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Pre-clinical experiment results showed that MHI-115 almost doubled the hair density of hairless macaques, and no significant shedding occurred even 4 years after stopping medication.
Almost doubling hair density is really nothing for an area that is already bald. If you go from 4 hairs/cm2 to 8 hairs/cm2 in an area that you used to have 100+ hairs/cm2 it doesn’t mean anything. So I hope that info is not accurate (and according to the pictorial results of those macaques I think the density virtually got much better)
 

pegasus2

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Almost doubling hair density is really nothing for an area that is already bald. If you go from 4 hairs/cm2 to 8 hairs/cm2 in an area that you used to have 100+ hairs/cm2 it doesn’t mean anything. So I hope that info is not accurate (and according to the pictorial results of those macaques I think the density virtually got much better)
I think this is explained by the fact that they called very short and thin hairs terminal hairs, hairs that we would typically call intermediate. All of those hairs grew to full thickness, and the vellus hairs too. The number of fully terminal hairs appears to have increased by a thousand fold
 

trialAcc

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Almost doubling hair density is really nothing for an area that is already bald. If you go from 4 hairs/cm2 to 8 hairs/cm2 in an area that you used to have 100+ hairs/cm2 it doesn’t mean anything. So I hope that info is not accurate (and according to the pictorial results of those macaques I think the density virtually got much better)
Pretty sure the areas classified as "bald" on the macaques still grew terminals in the triple digits, they just have more vellus then humans to start with so it's tough to predict what will happen I guess.
 

pegasus2

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If humor allows you to deny reality, good for you, stay in your denial my baldies.
I am certain it won't cost more than what I can afford. For everyone else, maybe dNovo in ten years will be cheap.
 

Dimitri001

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Damn, some of you lucky Yanks might get the treatment for free! I hope someone can get in, so we can have an informant.
 

pegasus2

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Clearly the better business case can be made for running an endo phase II trial, using those results to get more funding, and then running trials for hair loss or other indications with a safety net such that the whole company doesn't fail from one bad outcome.

Biotech moves really slow, nothing unusual in the timeline of events so far. Even large pharma companies usually prioritize a single indication when pushing a drug until at least phase III, and that's with vastly more resources and experience than this company has.

(and that's all without knowing what's actually happening behind the scenes - it's still not clear if regulatory bodies will force them to do a phase I in men or let them do some kind of combined phase I/II)
You might want to email this to Henri Doods so he knows he's making a terrible mistake pursuing Androgenetic Alopecia and endo at the same time
 

pegasus2

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For all intents and purposes in the context we care about here, this drug is still preclinical - we could literally have a human on Mars before this is available

so even though it's exciting...it might be smarter to manage your expectations about any single treatment vs being excited about the dozens of other preclinical treatments that could pay off

Here's some wild speculation (since that's the theme of the thread):

It could be the case that their relatively faster progress on phase I/II trials in women only signals that they're looking at it their product development much more sequentially than is being hoped here

ie get it near the end of phase III for endometriosis first, and only then move forward seriously on phase II for Androgenetic Alopecia

If there's obvious progress on the Androgenetic Alopecia side in a couple years, then I'm wrong about that (e.g. they're past the phase II subject recruitment stage)

this pattern would also be very similar to how finasteride itself was developed - despite knowing 100% it would also work for Androgenetic Alopecia, they waited until it was approved and in use for the prostate (and their investment recouped) before moving forward to get it approved for that 2nd indication (5 full years extra)
It seems they are more interested in pursuing Androgenetic Alopecia than you thought
 

hmmmmmmmm

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You might want to email this to Henri Doods so he knows he's making a terrible mistake pursuing Androgenetic Alopecia and endo at the same time
Yes, we should find out over the next year or two whether my speculation about their business plan is wrong...

If they concurrently run both trials without waiting for more funding from positive endo trial results

Either way, positive news. Will be interesting to see how the trial is structured when it gets registered for recruitment
 
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