Young Guy Contemplating Stock Monofilament System

Lost Boy

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Okay guys, I wanna know what everyone’s beef with monofilament hair systems are. It seems everyone hates them & I’d just like to know why. I’ve heard of people saying it doesn’t look natural but as for me I’m only 20 so i don’t think it’d look that bad. Plus i’ve seen thin mono ones & they didn’t seem bad. I feel like it fits my lifestyle more because you can replace it it every 4 weeks & you can’t do that with a lace or it’ll ruin it (even with tape so i’m told) I don’t really know how to do this whole process & am not looking to learn at the moment so i’m going to the salon & I wouldn’t want to have to pay them every week to clean & attach my piece. I can’t seem to find any reviews on it so i came her to look for some guidance. All answer are always appreciated, thank you.
 

Noah

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They are just old-fashioned, and you are not taking advantage of all the advances in hair systems in the last 25 years. You can never have a style which exposes your hairline, or lie down on a couch, or walk into a strong wind, unless you want everyone to know you are wearing a hairpiece. You also have to opt for a fairly dense long style, because any kind of short sculptured style would expose the base, which is coarse and highly detectable. Also I think nowadays any supplier which is making high quality systems is making them with lace or thinskin. There is simply no demand for subtle high quality systems with monofilament bases, because of the factors mentioned above. So monofilament is only being used for women's fashion wigs and the very cheapest lowest quality men's hairpieces with coarse Chinese or synthetic hair (available on Amazon for 59.99 a pop - free anti-static underwear included).

Of course they last forever, and when you have had enough wear you can polish the car with them. But the basic point is that durability and undetectability are incompatible. The very best most convincing hair systems are barely there - they have the finest most delicate bases materials, low density hair, and lots of scalp showing. Not many male wearers are willing to sacrifice undetectability and authenticity to get a hard-wearing hairpiece. It's kinda like buying cheap sushi - a false economy.

Noah
 

Lost Boy

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They are just old-fashioned, and you are not taking advantage of all the advances in hair systems in the last 25 years. You can never have a style which exposes your hairline, or lie down on a couch, or walk into a strong wind, unless you want everyone to know you are wearing a hairpiece. You also have to opt for a fairly dense long style, because any kind of short sculptured style would expose the base, which is coarse and highly detectable. Also I think nowadays any supplier which is making high quality systems is making them with lace or thinskin. There is simply no demand for subtle high quality systems with monofilament bases, because of the factors mentioned above. So monofilament is only being used for women's fashion wigs and the very cheapest lowest quality men's hairpieces with coarse Chinese or synthetic hair (available on Amazon for 59.99 a pop - free anti-static underwear included).

Of course they last forever, and when you have had enough wear you can polish the car with them. But the basic point is that durability and undetectability are incompatible. The very best most convincing hair systems are barely there - they have the finest most delicate bases materials, low density hair, and lots of scalp showing. Not many male wearers are willing to sacrifice undetectability and authenticity to get a hard-wearing hairpiece. It's kinda like buying cheap sushi - a false economy.

Noah
It must be that bad huh? My only problem with lace is that a lot of people say that you can’t have it on for an extended period of time otherwise you’ll ruin the piece. Now me not knowing how to do any of these hair system processes I’m going to a salon. So i’m kinda stuck in this position where i either keep it on for 4 weeks (with tape) as the salon advertises & ruin my piece, or spend loads of money having them detach the piece for me every week. I’m not really looking to learn to do all the processes as i have a bit on my plate right now & i’m just feeling like i’m at a dead end. It really sucks being in this position.
 

Noah

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The salons that stick your piece on for a month at a time are not using fine lace pieces, because they realise that they would not hold up well to that kind of wear. They are using more robust pieces - perhaps monofilament, but nowadays more likely one of the thicker "skin" pieces. So ruining the piece is not a problem - they are robust enough to take it. The downsides are: (1) you are getting a less realistic more detectable piece than you could; and (2) it is not very hygienic or good for your scalp to have the piece in place continually for a month. But if are OK to live with those downsides in exchange for less hassle, that is a perfectly legitimate decision to take. Tens of thousands of men are wearing hair systems using this arrangement.
 

Lost Boy

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The salons that stick your piece on for a month at a time are not using fine lace pieces, because they realise that they would not hold up well to that kind of wear. They are using more robust pieces - perhaps monofilament, but nowadays more likely one of the thicker "skin" pieces. So ruining the piece is not a problem - they are robust enough to take it. The downsides are: (1) you are getting a less realistic more detectable piece than you could; and (2) it is not very hygienic or good for your scalp to have the piece in place continually for a month. But if are OK to live with those downsides in exchange for less hassle, that is a perfectly legitimate decision to take. Tens of thousands of men are wearing hair systems using this arrangement.
The salons that stick your piece on for a month at a time are not using fine lace pieces, because they realise that they would not hold up well to that kind of wear. They are using more robust pieces - perhaps monofilament, but nowadays more likely one of the thicker "skin" pieces. So ruining the piece is not a problem - they are robust enough to take it. The downsides are: (1) you are getting a less realistic more detectable piece than you could; and (2) it is not very hygienic or good for your scalp to have the piece in place continually for a month. But if are OK to live with those downsides in exchange for less hassle, that is a perfectly legitimate decision to take. Tens of thousands of men are wearing hair systems using this arrangement.
Well see that’s the thing. I’m thinking about ordering a french lace and she’s going to do the cut in & she says the tape will last 3-4 weeks. What do you think of this? I’m contemplating between getting french lace or one of the thicker skin ones you speak about. How are they in terms of detectability? Is it like super noticeable like mono? Are there any other differences between the two besides detectability & durability?
Thanks
 

BaldBearded

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I think that a tape bond going 3-4 four weeks is a bit exaggerated. Especially with the hairline.

French lace is more breathable, and should last between 4-6 months! I have a very expensive, very well made one that is on seven months of wear (9 months old), and still looks decent.

I have never worn a monofilament, but I have been told they are more uncomfortable than lace.

Listen to @Noah, he knows his stuff.
 

Lost Boy

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I think that a tape bond going 3-4 four weeks is a bit exaggerated. Especially with the hairline.

French lace is more breathable, and should last between 4-6 months! I have a very expensive, very well made one that is on seven months of wear (9 months old), and still looks decent.

I have never worn a monofilament, but I have been told they are more uncomfortable than lace.

Listen to @Noah, he knows his stuff.
Hi there,
Yeah it seems like all factors go towards the french lace except one & that’s how often one removes & cleans it. A very important factor. It seems like my only solution is to learn how to do everything myself unless you guys have another solution. I know you guys say it’s not hard & everything but man i feel like i’m going in this completely blindfolded. Even when i watch the people on Youtube do it i just feel like there’s so much room for error & there’s always that fear of not attaching it properly, wrinkles in the lace, hairlines, etc etc etc. If only I was blessed with a normal head of hair. Hair loss sucks.
 

BaldBearded

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Hi there,
Yeah it seems like all factors go towards the french lace except one & that’s how often one removes & cleans it. A very important factor. It seems like my only solution is to learn how to do everything myself unless you guys have another solution. I know you guys say it’s not hard & everything but man i feel like i’m going in this completely blindfolded. Even when i watch the people on Youtube do it i just feel like there’s so much room for error & there’s always that fear of not attaching it properly, wrinkles in the lace, hairlines, etc etc etc. If only I was blessed with a normal head of hair. Hair loss sucks.

In the beginning, it was a total PITA!!! Now, it's nothing... truly. Remove, wash, tape, prep, replace. I can do it all within an hour.
 

Lost Boy

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In the beginning, it was a total PITA!!! Now, it's nothing... truly. Remove, wash, tape, prep, replace. I can do it all within an hour.
Yeah i think the only part i’d struggle with is where to exactly put the piece i don’t want it too low or too high ya know? I actually had a few questions about that whole process if you don’t mind me asking. I’ve seen your posts & im aware that you use tape as will I in the future. So my questions are:
How do you clean up/prep your piece & scalp when you take it off?
How do you take it off? Is there something you need to spray on it or something like that?
How long does your tape adhesive last?
Can you exercise/sweat in it? I’ve heard people saying that you can’t sweat or you risk compromising your adhesive. Does that mean it can fall off during exercise?
Since you have tape all around, does that mean you can’t show your hairline at all? Like if a wind were to hit you, or you just wanted to run your hands through it & slick the bangs up or something.
Can you feel your base when you run your hands through your french lace?
I think that’s everything, i look forward to hearing from you :)
Thank you!!!
 

Slapster

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Yeah, Lost Boy, I completely agree - going bald is horrible, but that's why we're all here and that's why hair replacement exists. If you'll feel better with hair, it's worth the hassle and you should go for it if you can afford it.

I'm a fairly new wearer, so I'm currently going through the trial and error of DIY. I'll try and answer as many of your questions as I can. I clean the piece using alcohol and cotton balls (it's a thinskin system). I grab a shower while it's drying, and use alcohol and shampoo to clean the residue from my scalp. After shaving the part of my scalp on which the system will sit, I use Walker Max Sport scalp protector. I place tape around the perimeter of the system, leaving gaps between each piece to allow drainage avenues for scalp sweat.

I find after the system has been on for a couple of weeks the bond on the tape starts to breakdown, so the system will peel straight off. If you have a lace system, you can spray a release spray if needed through the system onto the tape before removal.

My tape adhesive lasts about two weeks before the bond breaks down. I tried leaving it on for three weeks, but the broken down bond leaked into the hair and made a mess. Everyone's body chemistry is different, so you may get more or less time out of yours.

You can exercise and sweat into the system but, if you exercise a lot, get a lace base. I've got thinskin and can feel the sweat building up underneath, which isn't pleasant. I also think the sitting sweat affects the lifespan of the tape. It won't fall off during exercise, unless you've left it attached for way too long and the bond has completely broken down. Even then, something would need to hit or pull on it before it moves.

I have tape along my hairline and keep it covered. I personally wouldn't consider having an exposed hairline, but it's good enough that if the wind blows it back or whatever it still looks convincing. If you fixed any lifts with glue as and when needed, it would remain decent enough throughout the entire attachment.

Hope all of this helps. I'd also echo what the others have said - get your first system from a salon, then go DIY from there. It's scary but very doable, especially if you have someone to help you and reassure you that it's on straight. I actually messed up my first reattachment, but nobody could tell but me.
 

Lost Boy

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Yeah, Lost Boy, I completely agree - going bald is horrible, but that's why we're all here and that's why hair replacement exists. If you'll feel better with hair, it's worth the hassle and you should go for it if you can afford it.

I'm a fairly new wearer, so I'm currently going through the trial and error of DIY. I'll try and answer as many of your questions as I can. I clean the piece using alcohol and cotton balls (it's a thinskin system). I grab a shower while it's drying, and use alcohol and shampoo to clean the residue from my scalp. After shaving the part of my scalp on which the system will sit, I use Walker Max Sport scalp protector. I place tape around the perimeter of the system, leaving gaps between each piece to allow drainage avenues for scalp sweat.

I find after the system has been on for a couple of weeks the bond on the tape starts to breakdown, so the system will peel straight off. If you have a lace system, you can spray a release spray if needed through the system onto the tape before removal.

My tape adhesive lasts about two weeks before the bond breaks down. I tried leaving it on for three weeks, but the broken down bond leaked into the hair and made a mess. Everyone's body chemistry is different, so you may get more or less time out of yours.

You can exercise and sweat into the system but, if you exercise a lot, get a lace base. I've got thinskin and can feel the sweat building up underneath, which isn't pleasant. I also think the sitting sweat affects the lifespan of the tape. It won't fall off during exercise, unless you've left it attached for way too long and the bond has completely broken down. Even then, something would need to hit or pull on it before it moves.

I have tape along my hairline and keep it covered. I personally wouldn't consider having an exposed hairline, but it's good enough that if the wind blows it back or whatever it still looks convincing. If you fixed any lifts with glue as and when needed, it would remain decent enough throughout the entire attachment.

Hope all of this helps. I'd also echo what the others have said - get your first system from a salon, then go DIY from there. It's scary but very doable, especially if you have someone to help you and reassure you that it's on straight. I actually messed up my first reattachment, but nobody could tell but me.
Hey man I appreciate you answering. I hope things are going well for you in your hair replacement journey. I’m sure you’ll be a pro in no time. I’m still a bit confused on how you clean the system though. What exactly do you do with the alcohol & cotton balls?
Also, I’m guessing scalp protector is like a liquid you put on your scalp before putting your piece on?
What really horrifies me is the thought of it falling off. I feel as if I’d be living my life in fear if i got one. It’s a big reason I haven’t gotten one yet.
Do you still need to make spaces in between the tapes for a lace piece or no?
Last question if i may: How does one know when the adhesive is completely broken down. Say you usually reattach it every 2 weeks & it’s been 3 weeks. Would you consider that completely broken down?
Thanks again for your help. Good to know there are people out there because all this takes a toll on the mental & it sucks to feel lost.
All love
 

Slapster

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Thanks, it's definitely a journey!

When I take the system off, there's a gluey mess all over the base. Spraying alcohol onto the glue removes its stickiness and makes it runny, so rubbing cotton wool balls over it makes it stick to the balls. By repeatedly spraying and rubbing, all of the glue will eventually be off and the base is clean. Once I get a second system, I'll try what a lot of others on here do and soak the system whilst I wear the second piece. This is a more time consuming way of cleaning the piece, but should be easier and probably more hygienic.

Scalp protector is a clear liquid that you rub onto your head where the system is going to sit. It dries and acts as a barrier between your skin and the bond, so sweat and grease doesn't affect it as much. It's very easy to use.

I was terrified that the system would come off at first, but I quickly came to realise that wouldn't happen. The glue that the salon used and the tape I've used since is incredibly strong. If you pull on the system, it doesn't budge. After it's been on for a while, you literally have to peel it to get it off - it won't pull off or just slip off.

You don't need to leave spaces between the tape with a lace system as the sweat will escape through the base. I'm really looking forward to getting a lace system, as I'm pretty active.

You know when the bond breaks down as you can feel it seeping out from under the edges of the system. It's just a little at first, but the longer you leave it the more bond seeps out and it starts to get into your hair. When the bond breaks down will be unique to you, but you should manage to get a couple of weeks out of it. I left mine for a third week and tons of bond was seeping out. I found after it had been on for three weeks that I could slide the system around my head if I applied force. Again, it won't just fly off so you can get away with it as long as you handle it correctly, but keep in mind that the more the bond breaks down, the harder the cleanup as it makes more of a mess.

It does take a mental toll. I absolutely hate the sight of myself bald, but that's all the more reason to learn the art of wearing hair. Once you've nailed it, you've got a lifetime of the exact same hair coverage at the expense of an hour or so of time every fortnight.
 

deg_dilemma

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Here is a good video of what a skin hair system looks like when it has been glued in place for a month using the "Hair Club" method.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw-q8CoBWtc/

That woman does some quite neat stuff with guys' afro styles.

My UTS looks similar underneath after a couple of weeks: the glue literally rolls off using just my fingers and I don't use anything else to clean the base... using anything on the base would dry out the hair v-loops and cause them to break.

Next I clean my scalp with Fairy liquid (dish soap), then with alcohol, and finally re-apply the glue.

My aim is to keep the maintenance to a minimum and with as few 'tools/products' as possible.
 

Noah

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Yeah, it's not a bad looking result once it's on. But there is a difference between a couple of weeks and a month. Keeping that sludge of glue, body oil, sweat and bacteria pressed up against your scalp for a month can't be good. At the very least you are going to end up with blocked pores and pimples, and there must be a risk of skin infections.
 

Lost Boy

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Thanks, it's definitely a journey!

When I take the system off, there's a gluey mess all over the base. Spraying alcohol onto the glue removes its stickiness and makes it runny, so rubbing cotton wool balls over it makes it stick to the balls. By repeatedly spraying and rubbing, all of the glue will eventually be off and the base is clean. Once I get a second system, I'll try what a lot of others on here do and soak the system whilst I wear the second piece. This is a more time consuming way of cleaning the piece, but should be easier and probably more hygienic.

Scalp protector is a clear liquid that you rub onto your head where the system is going to sit. It dries and acts as a barrier between your skin and the bond, so sweat and grease doesn't affect it as much. It's very easy to use.

I was terrified that the system would come off at first, but I quickly came to realise that wouldn't happen. The glue that the salon used and the tape I've used since is incredibly strong. If you pull on the system, it doesn't budge. After it's been on for a while, you literally have to peel it to get it off - it won't pull off or just slip off.

You don't need to leave spaces between the tape with a lace system as the sweat will escape through the base. I'm really looking forward to getting a lace system, as I'm pretty active.

You know when the bond breaks down as you can feel it seeping out from under the edges of the system. It's just a little at first, but the longer you leave it the more bond seeps out and it starts to get into your hair. When the bond breaks down will be unique to you, but you should manage to get a couple of weeks out of it. I left mine for a third week and tons of bond was seeping out. I found after it had been on for three weeks that I could slide the system around my head if I applied force. Again, it won't just fly off so you can get away with it as long as you handle it correctly, but keep in mind that the more the bond breaks down, the harder the cleanup as it makes more of a mess.

It does take a mental toll. I absolutely hate the sight of myself bald, but that's all the more reason to learn the art of wearing hair. Once you've nailed it, you've got a lifetime of the exact same hair coverage at the expense of an hour or so of time every fortnight.
It doesn’t seem impossible, but as you suggested I think i’ll go to the salon for the first few times. My only question about that is would i be going every two weeks to fix everything up? Because i feel like that may not be the best option financially.

I think the reason I haven’t pulled the trigger yet is simply because of maintenance. I mean having to fix lifts every few days, detaching & reattaching every 1-2 weeks, making sure it’s sitting in its exact place, etc. It’s a bit much don't you think? All of those responsibilities hit you like a brick. It’s a big obstacle to overcome & I’ll have to think about this a lot. Thank you for helping again, it means a lot.
Lost
 
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