What Is The Most Effective Diet Plan?

soundnvision

Established Member
My Regimen
It's all genetics some people will always be big and struggle to lose weight then if they do have to practically starve themselves to keep it off.
Some are skinny as f*** like me and struggle to gain it and even if I do gain it I still look skinny because I have a small as f*** frame.
That's life.
 

shravani

Member
My Regimen
Weight loss is a very important factor in today’s life where lifestyle is quite sedentary and people tend to get weight-related issues. Let us see some of the best detox drink for weight loss.

Any diet that you will be willing to continue once you've achieved your weight loss goals (otherwise, you'll gain it all back). In other words, it's more about lifestyle than dieting. And as far as long-term lifestyle is concerned, I would recommend the Detox drink

Detox drink is one of the most popular and easy way to cleanse your body. It also helps lose weight and supplements your body with water soluble vitamins and minerals. Water itself is an effective fat burner and along with exercise, you are sure to lose that excess amount of unwanted fat. I HOPE THIS IS HELPFUL TO YOU.
 

LastHope123

Member
My Regimen
Growth even at 1IU / day can lead to irreversible side effects health-wise tho. That’s the drawback :/

Doubt you would get it at 1IU per day, since 1-3IU is used in teenagers etc. 4IU's is probably the lowest dosage for noticeable effects. 4IUs for changing muscle to fat ratio (weight loss basically) and 5-8IU for strength gain or something like that.
 

LastHope123

Member
My Regimen
From all the diet plans, what is the most effective?

Simple answer, burn more than you eat every day. No difference if you do no cardio or run a marathon every day if you don't go in calorie deficit. Every diet needs this, so the type of diet you want is what type of calorie deficit diet fits you the best. And from experience, simply because it worked for someone does not have to mean that it will work for you. So often times you need to test out different approaches and find out what you consider the best.

For me, I find it hard to go on a calorie deficit if I sit on my *** all day and have to limit my portions into really small ones because I have not burned that much calories that day. So I find it easier if I do lots of cardio often so I dont need to limit the portions that much. You have to get used to the feeling of being hungry most of the day, but you get used to it pretty fast within days. The hard part is to keep on going.

I have little experience with fasting diets, so I won't say anything about that. But from my experience, most of your calorie intake should be around the times where they are needed the most. This could be during work/school to not become grumpy and at least before and after exercising if you are doing that. That way you are sure that your performance is maximized, cause less performance ability means less calories burned.

I think eliminating certain macros in the diet completely is not that good in general (like a no-carb diet), because you want a good combination of carbs, proteins and fat to feel better in general. Leaning towards a diet consisting of more proteins and fat rather than carbohydrates is probably ideal though, but you still need a considerable amount of carbs to not get mental breakdowns. I would say regulating certain macros to different occations and times through the day is a better approach. Like slow carbs for breakfast combined with some fat for a long duration energy release, then more carbs throughout the day and fast carbs about 30-60 minutes before exercise. Then I would eat dinner after exercise, since dinner often contains more fat and proteins, and fat isn't that good right before exercising. A smaller meal with some carbs a couple of hours before bed to help the release of melatonin is also good.
 

Showatt

New Member
My Regimen
I like this one - The 28-Day Keto method:

The 28-Day Keto Challllenge is a step-by-sttep ketogeniic diiet guiide that featurres a full meal plann and 7 difffferent guides that will help you get started for the first month. As the name suggests, it provides you with all the information you need for 28 days exactly. There is a very solid and specific structure to this diet that makes it incredibly easy to follow. One of the biggest problems with other dietary programs is that they are overly complicated. This product features a variety of useful resources and materials to help you transition into this diet and stick with it.
 

Derelict

Senior Member
My Regimen
This thread interest me, i really need to lose a lot of weight, would a 500 calories a day diet work well? Or is that too little? i don't want anything overly complicated which alot of these sorts of diets are, just something healthy and normal that i can adapt to easily. Going to the gym isn't possible for me.
 

INT

Senior Member
This thread interest me, i really need to lose a lot of weight, would a 500 calories a day diet work well? Or is that too little? i don't want anything overly complicated which alot of these sorts of diets are, just something healthy and normal that i can adapt to easily. Going to the gym isn't possible for me.

500 a day is definitely dangerous. Why can't you workout if I may ask?
 

asabovesobelow

Member
My Regimen
Avoid processed foods. Many processed foods such as bread, pasta, etc. are poor in nutrients. Wheat and grains can also potentially disrupt your intestinal health. Avoid refined sugar.

Instead, consume unprocessed foods and make sure you're satisfying your nutritional needs in vitamins, minerals and other components such as omega-3 fatty acids. Don't dwelve into vegetarianism or veganism as you'll receive suboptimal levels, or even go deficient, of several substances only found in animals.

Fish and game is more nutritious than meat from livestock. Wild caught and fat fish such as salmon, herring and mackerel are exceptionally nutritious. Just make sure the fish you eat is caught in good regions. You don't want to end up consuming a lot of heavy metals.

And if you fancy the idea of raising human growth hormone levels in your body, as mentioned earlier in the thread, then long intermittent fasts should interest you greatly.
 

INT

Senior Member
Wheat and grains can also potentially disrupt your intestinal health. Avoid refined sugar.

Oats are one of the best things you can put into your body...

Don't dwelve into vegetarianism or veganism as you'll receive suboptimal levels, or even go deficient, of several substances only found in animals.

Many meta-analyses show that people on a balanced whole foods plant-based diet have the best health outcomes en the American Dietetics Organization (largest nutritional organization in the world) says that these diets are suitable for all stages of life and can provide benefits for avoiding a lot of the common chronic diseases we suffer from in the west.

And if you fancy the idea of raising human growth hormone levels in your body, as mentioned earlier in the thread, then long intermittent fasts should interest you greatly.

I am not saying that intermittent fasting cannot have some health benefits but having high human growth hormone levels also increases risk of cancer.
 

asabovesobelow

Member
My Regimen
Oats are one of the best things you can put into your body...
. It's high in B1 (thiamine) and iodine. It's not spectacular in any way. Meat, fish and organs cover more nutrients. Consumption of grains contributes to high blood sugar and thus insulin resistance.

Many meta-analyses show that people on a balanced whole foods plant-based diet have the best health outcomes en the American Dietetics Organization (largest nutritional organization in the world) says that these diets are suitable for all stages of life and can provide benefits for avoiding a lot of the common chronic diseases we suffer from in the west.
People going on diets are generally more physically active. Many diets also exclude processed foods. Sedentation and consumption of processed foods are the main contributors to the decline in health. But like I stated in my previous post, you'll miss out on various substances not acquired on a plant-based diet.

I am not saying that intermittent fasting cannot have some health benefits but having high human growth hormone levels also increases risk of cancer.
There's a substantial difference between exogenously consuming synthetic human growth hormone and the body's own regulation of the hormone.
 

pegasus2

Senior Member
My Regimen
This thread interest me, i really need to lose a lot of weight, would a 500 calories a day diet work well? Or is that too little? i don't want anything overly complicated which alot of these sorts of diets are, just something healthy and normal that i can adapt to easily. Going to the gym isn't possible for me.

I got a little pudgy once. Went on a three day fast followed by a two week 500 calorie diet and got my six pack back. I would do it again, but I wouldn't recommend that unless you're already in very good health to begin with.

Take any advice from vegans with a grain of salt. Those people are zealots who publish all kinds fake studies, and pressure groups to endorse their lifestyle. Any report that plant-based diets are healthier has to be scrutinized. Look at who funded it, and how many vegans are involved in the organization. These people have their tentacles everywhere.
 

INT

Senior Member
I got a little pudgy once. Went on a three day fast followed by a two week 500 calorie diet and got my six pack back. I would do it again, but I wouldn't recommend that unless you're already in very good health to begin with.

Take any advice from vegans with a grain of salt. Those people are zealots who publish all kinds fake studies, and pressure groups to endorse their lifestyle. Any report that plant-based diets are healthier has to be scrutinized. Look at who funded it, and how many vegans are involved in the organization. These people have their tentacles everywhere.

I am not vegan but come on, the meat and dairy industry are much bigger lobbies and fund waaaay more studies. I have never seen a study funded by the broccoli industry. Also, you are making ad hominem.

Again, I am not vegan but even the American Dietetics Organization has stated that a balanced whole foods vegan diets are perfectly adequate for people of all activities and ages which is congruent with the biggest peer-reviewed meta-analyses.

Sure it might not work for everyone and it is easy to miss out on a few nutrients if you do not do it right but for most people it can work and actually be beneficial from a health perspective.
 

pegasus2

Senior Member
My Regimen
I am not vegan but come on, the meat and dairy industry are much bigger lobbies and fund waaaay more studies. I have never seen a study funded by the broccoli industry. Also, you are making ad hominem.

Again, I am not vegan but even the American Dietetics Organization has stated that a balanced whole foods vegan diets are perfectly adequate for people of all activities and ages which is congruent with the biggest peer-reviewed meta-analyses.

Sure it might not work for everyone and it is easy to miss out on a few nutrients if you do not do it right but for most people it can work and actually be beneficial from a health perspective.

Adequate and optimal are two different things. I have no problem with people who want vegan/vegetarian diets, until they try to force it on everyone else. What I do have a problem with is people who are afraid of genetically modified foods. We have 7 billion people on this planet, and growing rapidly. I doubt we can feed them all on a natural, whole food diet without any pesticides or GMOs. They'd have us go back to pre-1960 levels of food spending.
thr-income-spent-on-food_custom-ed63b133b0b3914191e299c179a61271caa0db71-s800-c85.png
 

INT

Senior Member
Adequate and optimal are two different things.

There is no optimal diet for everyone. However, vegan diets have shown to reduce the chances of getting a lot of our most common mortal diseases. And I am not talking about small, funded studies here. Seems more than adequate to me...


Here is what the ADA said:

"It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat (including fowl) or seafood, or products containing those foods.

This article reviews the current data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, n-3 fatty acids, iron, zinc, iodine, calcium, and vitamins D and B-12. A vegetarian diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, supplements or fortified foods can provide useful amounts of important nutrients. An evidence- based review showed that vegetarian diets can be nutritionally adequate in pregnancy and result in positive maternal and infant health outcomes.

The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals."


I have no problem with people who want vegan/vegetarian diets, until they try to force it on everyone else.

Are you not doing the same? You are telling people to disregard vegan advice. Is that not also forsing your beliefs on others? I know a lot of people who are vegan who are completely fine with me occasionally eating animal products but I have a few friends on a keto diet who always get very pushy about their dietary beliefs.

Adequate and optimal are two different things.
What I do have a problem with is people who are afraid of genetically modified foods. We have 7 billion people on this planet, and growing rapidly. I doubt we can feed them all on a natural, whole food diet without any pesticides or GMOs. They'd have us go back to pre-1960 levels of food spending.View attachment 133327

I get that... Something that worries me a lot as well...But how about all the scary stuff that gets injected into the animals in animal agriculture? And what do you think uses more of our lands? Animal or plant agriculture?
 

pegasus2

Senior Member
My Regimen
There is no optimal diet for everyone. However, vegan diets have shown to reduce the chances of getting a lot of our most common mortal diseases. And I am not talking about small, funded studies here. Seems more than adequate to me...


Here is what the ADA said:

"It is the position of the American Dietetic Association that appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthful, nutritionally adequate, and may provide health benefits in the prevention and treatment of certain diseases. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the life cycle, including pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, and adolescence, and for athletes. A vegetarian diet is defined as one that does not include meat (including fowl) or seafood, or products containing those foods.

This article reviews the current data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, n-3 fatty acids, iron, zinc, iodine, calcium, and vitamins D and B-12. A vegetarian diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. In some cases, supplements or fortified foods can provide useful amounts of important nutrients. An evidence- based review showed that vegetarian diets can be nutritionally adequate in pregnancy and result in positive maternal and infant health outcomes.

The results of an evidence-based review showed that a vegetarian diet is associated with a lower risk of death from ischemic heart disease. Vegetarians also appear to have lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, lower blood pressure, and lower rates of hypertension and type 2 diabetes than nonvegetarians. Furthermore, vegetarians tend to have a lower body mass index and lower overall cancer rates. Features of a vegetarian diet that may reduce risk of chronic disease include lower intakes of saturated fat and cholesterol and higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, soy products, fiber, and phytochemicals."




Are you not doing the same? You are telling people to disregard vegan advice. Is that not also forsing your beliefs on others? I know a lot of people who are vegan who are completely fine with me occasionally eating animal products but I have a few friends on a keto diet who always get very pushy about their dietary beliefs.



I get that... Something that worries me a lot as well...But how about all the scary stuff that gets injected into the animals in animal agriculture? And what do you think uses more of our lands? Animal or plant agriculture?

I'm not even arguing with someone who can't understand that the equivalent of vegans trying to force everyone else to become vegans would be me trying to force vegans to become meat eaters. It is completely different for me to tell omnivores that they don't have to convert to herbivores to be healthy. I'm not trying to force people to change their diets, just warning them that there is an agenda out there.
 

INT

Senior Member
I'm not even arguing with someone who can't understand that the equivalent of vegans trying to force everyone else to become vegans would be me trying to force vegans to become meat eaters. It is completely different for me to tell omnivores that they don't have to convert to herbivores to be healthy. I'm not trying to force people to change their diets, just warning them that there is an agenda out there.

That is fine, we don't need to talk about the ethical part. I also did not mean it as an equivalent obviously. But to be honest man, and I might be wrong but it kind of sounds like you are making a red herring to not to address the ecological and health-related points I made. This topic is a diet-related one, you were the one that brought ideology into it by the way...
 
Top