Topical vitamin D3 - anyone tried it for Androgenetic Alopecia

RStGeorge

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There are Clinical studies on the effectiveness of Topical Vitamin D3 for Alopecia Areata, and some studies linking low serum Vitamin D3 to Androgenetic Alopecia, and some studies suggesting that oral Vitamin D may be a useful adjuvant in Androgenetic Alopecia.

But I can find zero studies nor anecdotal experience of topical Vitamin D3 for Androgenetic Alopecia.

Surprisingly, topical Vitamin D3 DOES NOT increase serum Vitamin D3 levels, but it does apparently act to reduce oxidative stress on the skin, so whether it can improve response to Androgenetic Alopecia is an open question.

I would like to ask if anyone with Androgenetic Alopecia has tried topical Vit D3, and if so, what your experience has been?
 

RStGeorge

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Just found an interesting patent from 1994 along these same lines.

 

michaelle

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That's pretty interesting here, thank you for sharing the info! Anything else you can share? It was an interesting read. As for some meds, I think you might find something interesting to you on eDrugStore.com for example. It is a really good and trusted service which you will like. Good luck!
 
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zaman

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There's a new study on Niacinimide too. A topical with Vitamin D3, Zinc, Niacinimide & Melatonin could be useful
 

FromHairy2LarryDavid

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As a topical? That seems unlikely, otherwise Zix would probably cause more hair loss.
Yeah always viewed Zix with confusion for that reason but I suppose it’s fine topically.

Just that along with a handful of others online, my finasteride progress was obliterated by a year on it orally so I’m avoiding it altogether.

To keep it relevant tho I am on D3 for a while now but not sure if anything will come of it.
 

OtyMac

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Can you link to this study?
Is this the one?


This study is as phony as a 3 dollar bill and conflict of interests are P&G who will try to encourage anybody from trying a cheap molecule which CAN stimulate hair growth. Look for a P&G topical to come out shortly...





Look at what Turnbuckle had to say about niacinamide.....also look at his mitochondrial dynamics page
Damaged mitochondria create more ROS....how long do you want them? They also create less energy, how long do you want them?


"Niacinamide will kill off mitochondria, starting with the most defective ones. You could lose a third of the total in a week. So heavy dosing is something you want to do intermittently. If you are older, this can be good for you as the remaining mitochondria repopulate the cells. With many cycles you can fix problems that took decades to develop."

It's probably all degraded to NAM no matter what the dose. But that doesn't matter as NAM raises NAD+ very nicely. Any perceived advantage of NR over NAM (or NAM+R, especially) is purely marketing. A second problem is daily use. This will suppress mito mass and result in lower ATP output. NR or NAM+R should thus be used intermittently, and/or with PQQ.
 
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OtyMac

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For those that want to pursue niacinamide then do what Turnbuckle suggested in his thread I referenced. One day of topical niacinamide and ribose and two days of topical stearic acid. Repeat a few cycles. We shouldn't need continual fission with niacinamide and ribose but after some repair cycles should only need stearic acid which is mentioned in some hair loss patents too.

What it all boils down to is that females just have better fission and fusion function.


These mitochondria are damaged in the study below but not senescent because senescent cells are larger and flattened and the researchers called the balding cells similar in shape but smaller.



This is interesting also that at least in a PCOS model that dht is driving fission too hard. Too much fission in the mitochondria results in cell apoptosis. In other words we may want more fusion to balance out the fission.



The thecal cells in the dht treated ovary were smaller in size JUST LIKE THE study of balding dermal papilla in the Randall study above:
in one-month DHT-induced rat, we found an induction of early antral granulosa cell apoptosis, follicular growth arrest, disrupted folliculogenesis and anovulation, but without systemic changes (e.g. body weight changes and insulin sensitivity index). We also observed the accumulation of small atypical follicles and a reduction in ovarian length and weight, features that are characteristic of the fifteen days21 and three-month DHT-induced model20,2

In PCOS (Fig. 8A), androgen excess results in the up-regulation of Drp1 leading to overabundant increased mitochondrial fission. This dysregulation in mitochondrial fission results in an increased in apoptosis and possibly autophagy, leading to early antral follicular growth arrest.



Counterpoint, in this study it looks like to me we have too much fusion in male pattern baldness. Cells are stuck in catagen(IIRC) and have become apoptosis resistant and hence no hair growth.

Neutralizing stress with either GSH or ROS scavengers effectively blocked mitochondrial fusion, indicating that this is a requisite event for fusion even in steady state. As a more global stress response, we note that increased GSSG levels have been reported in many of the physiological conditions associated with mitochondrial hyperfusion, including the transition between G1/S, to cellular senescence and starvation-induced autophagy [21–23].

It has been proposed that hyperfused mitochondria will render the cells resistant to cell death and mitophagy [5
 
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GabberHead

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I’d exclude Zinc. It boosts T
Zinc has only been shown to increase testosterone in older males who were already difficient in zinc. It isn't going to 'boost' testosterone if you have a healthy diet. Long-term and high-dosed zinc supplements can be problematic for other reasons though e.g. competing with copper absorption.
 

OtyMac

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Zinc has only been shown to increase testosterone in older males who were already difficient in zinc. It isn't going to 'boost' testosterone if you have a healthy diet. Long-term and high-dosed zinc supplements can be problematic for other reasons though e.g. competing with copper absorption.
Isn't zinc one of the micronutrients deficient in Androgenetic Alopecia? I'll compile every freaking thing we are deficient in one of these days...
 

resu

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The study I remember seeing some years ago was D2 not the D3 variant but maybe I'm wrong.
 

OtyMac

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This is vitamin D2 related thread...


Groh(TM) is a natural nutritional supplement that is currently offered online and through leading hair salons throughout North America. The Groh(TM) formulation features ErgoD2(TM) (a 100% USDA certified organic ingredient) that is naturally rich in Ergothioneine and Ergocalciferol (vitamin D2). ErgoD2(TM) is manufactured utilizing the Company's patented UV light technology, which naturally increases D2 levels by as much as 2000%.


Also:








The objective of this randomised controlled study is to examine the effect of vitamin D supplementation on body composition and the expression of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA.

An intervention was performed through supplementation with cholecalciferol at the concentration of 2000 IU in 90 healthy adult monozygotic twins (male or female pairs) for 2 months. The findings showed that serum vitamin D concentration increased by 65% and VDR gene expression sixty times (p = 0.001).

Changes in body composition parameters were observed regarding body fat and lean mass. Our results indicate that an increase in serum vitamin D concentration may have potential therapeutic implications.
 
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Bobbyhair

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Vitamin D apparently has an effect on prolactin levels, I will try it asap (topically)
 
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