Studies Showing Why Dht Inhibition Doesn’t Work For Some Women With Androgenetic Alopecia | HairLossTalk Forums

Studies Showing Why Dht Inhibition Doesn’t Work For Some Women With Androgenetic Alopecia

Discussion in 'Women's General Hair Loss Discussions' started by Georgie, Nov 26, 2017.

  1. Georgie

    Georgie Senior Member My Regimen

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    A very Interesting article I read about Aromatase enzyme produced in the adrenal glands, ovaries, brain being linked to female hairloss moreso than DHT. In women with lower functional production of the enzyme via estrogens (so If you have ovarian/adrenal/pituitary female hormone issues), this may be the cause of your hairloss, as Aromatase is helpful in supporting hair growth, and why many women with normal androgen/dht levels don’t respond to antiandrogen therapy. This enzyme is found abundantly in the frontal hairline in women where this is not the case with men, which is why often in FPHL the hairline is maintained. What I find particularly interesting about this, is that I have both pituitary and ovarian hormonal Insufficeny. I have to take the oil to have any sort of estrogen. When my hairloss started, however, many doctors were confused about what sort it was, as my hairline receded hugely, and my eyelashes/brows also thinned. At the time I was not receiving hormone replacement for my 0 estrogen levels, so it makes sense to me that since I had no estrogen = Aromatase enzyme (abundant in hairline/lashes/brows in females), these were all terribly effected for me. I have also found that even after being on a dose of 200mg on spironolactone for 9 months in the past, my hairloss never got any better, and constituted at the same rate. So the question is ladies - are those of us with normal androgen/test/dht levels attacking this from the wrong angle? Is it that we need to both eliminate DHT and somehow boost Aromatase enzyme levels? (Btw being on Diane-35 hasn’t Helped either). There are many question marks here, but I will leave this article here for you to read yourselves.

    http://www.androgeneticalopecia.com/hair-loss-biology/hair-loss-aromatase.shtml
     
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  2. UberBaldaten

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    Any info on how to restore aromatase enzyme in local scalp?
    It makes sense since aromatase enzyme is the one producing estrogen. You can have 0 androgens, but if aromatase isn't there to induce estrogen in local tissue, then there won't be regeneration of follicles.
    Maybe this could be the solution.
    Local 5ar inhibitor+ estrogen/aromatase agonist.
     
  3. Georgie

    Georgie Senior Member My Regimen

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    I was going to make a post exactly about this in the men’s forums, but since you’re here, let’s discuss. I have no looked into “Aromatase replacement” as such, but I can account for myself, and many trans women who hugely increase their estrogen levels + minoxidil that restoring the instigator FOR Aromatase along with growth stimulant regrows the hairline. Sadly since female hormone therapy isn’t an option for men, the obvious solution would be to find a means by which we can directly harness the enzyme itself and apply it to areas lacking on the male pattern affected scalp, since your lacking Aromatase is what leaves the fronto-temporal areas vulnerable unlike women with aromatse-producing estrogen. I have already planned to look into this. One thing I can say for post-menopausal women who have experienced this phenomenon of hairloss due to Aromatase inhibition and estrogen suppression, is that we were treated with minoxidil, a 5-alpha inhibitor and most notably, 17-alpha, which is an estrogenic anti androgen. I haven’t seen any men try 17-alpha, so perhaps that could be helpful?
     
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  4. Georgie

    Georgie Senior Member My Regimen

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    Ps maybe start a thread about this in your section?
     
  5. Georgie

    Georgie Senior Member My Regimen

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  6. Georgie

    Georgie Senior Member My Regimen

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    And by the way, Quercetin was mentioned as an inhibitor. Some of you who follow the role of PGD2 is hairloss might find that interesting.
     
  7. Georgie

    Georgie Senior Member My Regimen

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    I’m just going to throw a hypothetical theory out there: since we know that circulating estrogen goes hand-in-hand with increased Aromatase levels, perhaps dht blockers which increase levels of estrogens in men may POTENTIALLY be better for the hairline which is lacking in Aromatase enzyme? Obviously studies need to be done, but if estrogen = Aromatase i suppose it’s a plausible theory. PERHAPS low doses of sprio, maybe even Topical spironolactone, could be helpful?
     
  8. Afro_Vacancy

    Afro_Vacancy Senior Member My Regimen

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    Yes, people have pointed that out before. It may be that the modest regrowth some get from finasterirde is due to the ~15% increase in estrogen, where that number is an average and some people get a lot more. In contrast, RU 58841 blocks androgen-receptor binding but has no impact on estrogen, if there were ever a good comparative study, you'd then expect finasteride to be a little more effective.

    An issue with alleged aromatase inhibitors like Quercetin is that consumer demand from male bodybuilders has driven the manufacture of a lot of bullshit in the supplements industry. A lot of men want aromatase inhibitors to get more muscles at the gym, also to prevent the risk of gyno when taking steroids. There's basically a general situation where we all, unfortunately, cannot trust what supplements are alleged to do.
     
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