Stemson is going to use minipigs in the next stage of their hair cloning research

Raccooner

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I listened to the interview again. What I suspect is going on at this time is they know how to grow the hairs because Geoff is hinting about the scaffolding needing to get worked out now. The problem is scaffolds need to be inserted into the scalp with great proximate density and they are trying to get that worked out. So yes, it may be the situation is not as grim as I'm making it to be. One would think this could get easily resolved if it is the main barrier holding them back. There's probably more he's not letting on or telling us perhaps.

I would like to know is if even one hair follicle got implanted into a human scalp. If it did, I am wondering the result. The fact is if we knew their iSPCs worked in humans it would help calm my anxieties. Still, we have no evidence it has worked in pigs yet, so where does that leave us? Would it kill Geoff to say, yes, we grew hair in the pig models used? This is why I want us to interview him.
 

Raccooner

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I composed a nice email for a written interview with CEO Geoff Hamilton. I stated there would be questions asked from the membership of this forum on Hair Loss Talk. I mentioned we had some thoughtful questions likely never asked. So far, it's been over a week and no reply. I've gotten no replies from Stemson in a long time. I'm wondering if it's me they're annoyed with or if they just don't reply to emails from regular people anymore. Could someone here throw out a question to them and see if they reply? Ask for an interview with Geoff Hamilton perhaps. I'm curious if I am being ignored by them or if they ignore everyone more or less who they view to be unimportant.
 

H

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I composed a nice email for a written interview with CEO Geoff Hamilton. I stated there would be questions asked from the membership of this forum on Hair Loss Talk. I mentioned we had some thoughtful questions likely never asked. So far, it's been over a week and no reply. I've gotten no replies from Stemson in a long time. I'm wondering if it's me they're annoyed with or if they just don't reply to emails from regular people anymore. Could someone here throw out a question to them and see if they reply? Ask for an interview with Geoff Hamilton perhaps. I'm curious if I am being ignored by them or if they ignore everyone more or less who they view to be unimportant.
I sent an email I think last year and this year at sometime with no reply so don't take it personal. I assume they have been mute because things aren't turning out. Sure, it very well could be a scenario where they are not saying anything because they are trying to keep it hush, their busy, or perhaps some other reason that discounts the hair loss industries almost flawless track record of dissappointments however, that doesnt seem likely.
 

Raccooner

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I sent an email I think last year and this year at sometime with no reply so don't take it personal. I assume they have been mute because things aren't turning out. Sure, it very well could be a scenario where they are not saying anything because they are trying to keep it hush, their busy, or perhaps some other reason that discounts the hair loss industries almost flawless track record of dissappointments however, that doesnt seem likely.
Thank you for following up on my suggestion. I'm glad to know then it's not me. I take a sincere interest in Stemson Therapeutics and am curious to know what developments have been made from them. Why that should put me in bad standing with them makes no sense. I even found Geoff Hamilton's personal phone number and left him two messages on his answering tape. No return. I'm not going to try again as I don't want to harass him, but this avoidance doesn't look good. I actually have more confidence in Fukuda Labs now. I sent them an email as well encouraging them to begin studies to develop human hair cloning. I think it's good we contact these groups. The reason is if government agencies want to slow them down for safety concerns, they could show proof of the emails they receive, and it may encourage regulators to reconsider their restrictions. Hair loss sufferers need a lobby so that we can get research and funding more and quicker. This might be a more productive use of our time here than just waiting for things to fall into our laps. We need to take a proactive approach to this. We need to take money and political steps to improve our chances of finding a cure more quickly. If anyone is interested in working to form a lobby, drop a comment, we can exchange information and hopefully form our own group to work together.
 
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Armando Jose

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Thank you for following up on my suggestion. I'm glad to know then it's not me. I take a sincere interest in Stemson Therapeutics and am curious to know what developments have been made from them. Why that should put me in bad standing with them makes no sense. I even found Geoff Hamilton's personal phone number and left him two messages on his answering tape. No return. I'm not going to try again as I don't want to harass him, but this avoidance doesn't look good. I actually have more confidence in Fukuda Labs now. I sent them an email as well encouraging them to begin studies to develop human hair cloning. I think it's good we contact these groups. The reason is if government agencies want to slow them down for safety concerns, they could show proof of the emails they receive, and it may encourage regulators to reconsider their restrictions. Hair loss sufferers need a lobby so that we can get research and funding more and quicker. This might be a more productive use of our time here than just waiting for things to fall into our laps. We need to take a proactive approach to this. We need to take money and political steps to improve our chances of finding a cure more quickly. If anyone is interested in working to form a lobby, drop a comment, we can exchange information and hopefully form our own group to work together.
Hi Raccooner, good for your iniciative, can we see your questions to Geoff Hamilton?
 

Joxy

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I continue to provide surgical pathology services and am director of Histology and Pathology at Stemson Therapeutics. I have reached the one-year mark at Stemson and am enjoying my position immensely. I see amazing research results on an almost daily basis as specimens are processed through my department. I want to share some of these exciting advances with you. Stemson Therapeutics is a leading research company in the field of regenerative medicine and I am very excited to be a part of this team. I would like to describe how Stemson’s research is breaking new ground. Traditionally the surgeon’s job is to remove barriers to healing. If a bone is broken, they reset it. If tissues are traumatized and displaced, they are sutured back in place. If there is infection, antibiotics are prescribed. Allowing normal wound healing usually results in generation of scar tissue, the original parenchyma and anatomy is often lost. More recently Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is used to enhance wound healing. Guided tissue regenerative techniques employ PRP and osteoinductive materials to regenerate bone. This is the dawn of a new frontier in regenerative medicine. Up until now regenerative cell therapy consisted of manipulating stems cells to differentiate into single tissue types. Islet cells producing insulin to treat type one diabetes or neuronal cells producing dopamine to treat Parkinson’s disease are some of the latest biotechnologies to enter clinical trials. At Stemson Therapeutics we are growing hair follicles for transplantation in our patients with alopecia, male patterned baldness and many other causes of hair loss. We are removing the barriers to the cell’s genetic programs, switching them back on allowing regeneration of the original tissues and anatomy. I can observe all the histology of the regenerated hair follicles, epithelial root sheath around hair shafts, dermal papilla, sebaceous glands and pilar erector muscle to name a few. I find it simply amazing. Peering through my microscope has never been more exciting. We will be able to regenerate entire organs and anatomic structures moving forward. Curing diseases like hypothyroidism by reprogramming stem cells to regenerate the thyroid gland is but one example of curing life long chronic diseases. Organ transplants will become obsolete. Finally we must ask the complex questions such as where will this ultimately lead? Controversy and debate lie ahead. It is important this new biotechnology is used ethically for everyone and not just for an elite few. We must be vigilant and constantly on guard for those with nefarious intentions. As the scientists who help create pathways into the medical frontiers, we are also responsible for effecting the biomedical ethics governing its use.
 

kiwi666

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Jesus H Christ. We’re loosing our hair and you give us generic. Did you copy and paste this sh*t from the marketing department.

I’d expect a lot more from somebody who claims to be in the field than PR(BS)P. What else do you do that I don’t care about? Save babies lives? Rescue cats?

Before and after pics showing hair growth or it didn’t happen pal.
 
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badnewsbearer

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i dont understand why there has been so much questioning about whether they can or know how to make the hair follicles DHT resistant, why couldn't they just silence the androgen receptor and the 5AR 1+2 genes. that can be quite easily done in culture already. no need to identify some fancy target genes for Androgenetic Alopecia in general.
 

Joxy

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Jesus H Christ. We’re loosing our hair and you give us generic. Did you copy and paste this sh*t from the marketing department.

I’d expect a lot more from somebody who claims to be in the field than PR(BS)P. What else do you do that I don’t care about? Save babies lives? Rescue cats?

Before and after pics showing hair growth or it didn’t happen pal.
This is not only for bioengineerd hair. These kind of research will open doors to many other fields in tissuse regeneration. Hair follicle is very complex organ. It is not easy task. Especially working with iPSCs. iPSCs are new to the science, so FDA and scientists are skeptical working with them for safety reasons. I understand why Stemson are working slowly and going step by step. Nobody wants to put you cancer on your hair and end up in jail. Or spend 30-50 million dollars on clinical trials and can’t control how iPSCs behave in the body. It is a problem, because iPSCs after one passage can grow and behave like neural cells instead like dermal papilla cells or whatever.
 

-specter-

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This is not only for bioengineerd hair. These kind of research will open doors to many other fields in tissuse regeneration. Hair follicle is very complex organ. It is not easy task. Especially working with iPSCs. iPSCs are new to the science, so FDA and scientists are skeptical working with them for safety reasons. I understand why Stemson are working slowly and going step by step. Nobody wants to put you cancer on your hair and end up in jail. Or spend 30-50 million dollars on clinical trials and can’t control how iPSCs behave in the body. It is a problem, because iPSCs after one passage can grow and behave like neural cells instead like dermal papilla cells or whatever.
All of this is very fascinating, even going beyond the possibility of recreating a hair. Right now I see two ways for the future and I believe both must coexist, the first is regeneration in the body and the second when self-regeneration is not possible, precisely recreating an organ such as the heart in the laboratory, so as to give back to the patient a perfect brand new twenty year old guy heart, without side effects such as those of an organ transplant, thus restoring a normal life to the patient, or being able to recreate an eyeball in the laboratory for a patient who has lost his sight.

I think the hair follicle is the perfect test bed for this technology because it is a very small but at the same time very complex organ.
even if it were possible to treat androgenetic alopecia (HMI etc) in another way, this technology would still find space for those cases in which it is not possible to recover one's hair or even one wants to increase the existing ones, in this way the surgeons would not lose their jobs but it would change to keep up with these technologies
 

-specter-

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In simple words, even reassuring hair surgeons, their job would change from simply having to fix the hair to actually making aesthetic changes and improvements, as in other areas of cosmetic surgery where patients are really satisfied with the results. For now, hair surgeons are limited by the patient's initial conditions, but then more and more people could choose to schedule an operation to have an aesthetic touch up.
 

Raccooner

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In simple words, even reassuring hair surgeons, their job would change from simply having to fix the hair to actually making aesthetic changes and improvements, as in other areas of cosmetic surgery where patients are really satisfied with the results. For now, hair surgeons are limited by the patient's initial conditions, but then more and more people could choose to schedule an operation to have an aesthetic touch up.
Hair cloning would make the surgeon's job way easier. No longer needing to extract the donor supply would be a relief to them and the patient especially and this way surgeons could service more people and make more money. A win for everyone all around. The issue I have is can the hair implants be grafted closely enough together with the limited blood supply going to the area? It may require still two or three rounds of surgery over month's time to get the desired result still. Any thoughts on this?

What angers me is I think Stemson has the ability already to less efficiently give people what they need for hair restoration. Everything is a business, so until they have exactly what they want to be profitable, we'll have to sit, wait and suffer until then. I want my cloned follicles now, not when I'm 60.
 

-specter-

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Hair cloning would make the surgeon's job way easier. No longer needing to extract the donor supply would be a relief to them and the patient especially and this way surgeons could service more people and make more money. A win for everyone all around. The issue I have is can the hair implants be grafted closely enough together with the limited blood supply going to the area? It may require still two or three rounds of surgery over month's time to get the desired result still. Any thoughts on this?

What angers me is I think Stemson has the ability already to less efficiently give people what they need for hair restoration. Everything is a business, so until they have exactly what they want to be profitable, we'll have to sit, wait and suffer until then. I want my cloned follicles now, not when I'm 60.
As far as surgical hair transplantation is concerned, I think the limitation of blood flow and trauma, even if minimal, will always apply, so more sessions will have to be done if you want densities similar or equal to the natural one. I thought that with the use of robots instead of human hands a lot could have been solved, but apparently as far as hair transplantation is concerned, robots give a lower result than the surgeon for now. I too think it's better to get your hair back now rather than at an older age when the priorities are different, in fact we often speak "only" of an aesthetic problem, as if good sociability and high self-esteem count for nothing for human beings. My superior in the military always said that human beings only need three things: food, sleep, poop. I would also add another two which are leisure and sociality which also includes sexuality, without these a normal person lives badly and ends up going crazy. Not to mention that being forced to not be able to open up to the fullest, not to have the look you want is a limitation to the individual's self-determination and makes the person feel old before their time. Not to mention when this pathology arises at a young age such as adolescence, the boy will end up feeling finished and out of place, and let's be honest, it's not that his other peers are kind and mature with him, he will always end up being the one targeted for some joke, he will always have to be mature and not take it out on something that ultimately ruined his life and denied him a healthy relationship with the opposite sex. I find it really hateful and petty to call it only an aesthetic problem when a person's appearance is important (let's not say otherwise) and that this affects a person's character and future relationships.
 

It_is_over_for_nw7

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As far as surgical hair transplantation is concerned, I think the limitation of blood flow and trauma, even if minimal, will always apply, so more sessions will have to be done if you want densities similar or equal to the natural one. I thought that with the use of robots instead of human hands a lot could have been solved, but apparently as far as hair transplantation is concerned, robots give a lower result than the surgeon for now. I too think it's better to get your hair back now rather than at an older age when the priorities are different, in fact we often speak "only" of an aesthetic problem, as if good sociability and high self-esteem count for nothing for human beings. My superior in the military always said that human beings only need three things: food, sleep, poop. I would also add another two which are leisure and sociality which also includes sexuality, without these a normal person lives badly and ends up going crazy. Not to mention that being forced to not be able to open up to the fullest, not to have the look you want is a limitation to the individual's self-determination and makes the person feel old before their time. Not to mention when this pathology arises at a young age such as adolescence, the boy will end up feeling finished and out of place, and let's be honest, it's not that his other peers are kind and mature with him, he will always end up being the one targeted for some joke, he will always have to be mature and not take it out on something that ultimately ruined his life and denied him a healthy relationship with the opposite sex. I find it really hateful and petty to call it only an aesthetic problem when a person's appearance is important (let's not say otherwise) and that this affects a person's character and future relationships.
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