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Pillows, Pillows, Pillows..??..

Discussion in 'Men's General Hair Loss Discussions' started by Guest, Jul 12, 2007.

  1. Bryan

    Bryan Senior Member
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    Be careful there, Sam. You need to clearly specify which side you think the "retarded arguments" are coming from.
     
  2. powersam

    powersam Senior Member

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    No I don't. :)
     
  3. Bryan

    Bryan Senior Member
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    Do you have a problem with my replies to Stephen Foote?
     
  4. michael barry

    michael barry Senior Member

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    Wookie,


    Follica has a website that you can google. Kurt Stenn (used to be the head derm guy at Johnsnon and Johnson and Harvard, currently researches Cloning for Aderans), and George Costarialis (Univ of Penn Medical---early cloning researcher), were two of the guys who head this thng.

    Fifty years ago it was noted that on rabbits that they would form new hairs in the middle of wounds for no apparent reason. Scientists then wrote it off and didn't pursue it because the thinking was then that there was no way that it would transmit to humans.
    What Follica has found is that if you up wnt-protien signalling just a bit after wounding skin on a nude mouse, new hair will form. The hair will not be pigmented though as melanocytes apparently are not remade. Obviously they are excited about this.


    I had read posts about a guy who a few years ago on hairlosshell injected minoxidil with a syringe and claimed great regrwoth. minoxidil supposedly might up wnt signalling by a small measure, but Ive not been able to track this down for certain. There are a few things (I think someone told me lithium chloride or some such chemical, and someone else even mentioned retin-A on hairsite, but I cant verify that) helps up wnt. Anyway, the hope is (for me personally) that a FUE transplant, in which the donor holes in the back get wnt protiens put on them would regenerate hairs in the donor area, while moving the follicles that were there up front.

    I openly wonder that if the wounding took place up front where we are liable to go bald wouldn't just give up more male pattern baldness-type follicles and if where on the scalp the hairs form has anything to do with the hairs that are created. Costarialis has mentioned dermabrasion as a way to hurt the skin somewhat before application of a substance that would up wnt signalling or wnt protiens. We will see. They formed a company though, and they have a website, so they are serious about this.




    As far as graft contraction......................its suppoesed to happen in the healing of the big 4 mm (God those must have looked awful, measure out four millimeteres on a ruler and try and imagine 20 hairs or more in it from the back of your head, sitting alone in dots on the front of your scalp------geesh) plugs, the large amount of scar tissue from these plugs (the scalpels and such used back in the day to make these would have been gigantic compared to the .75mm instruments and the 1.00mm instruments some surgeones use now. I think that Dr. Woods in Austarlia uses somethign like a .29 or similarly unbelievably small needle-like knife to make recipeint SLITS in the dermis to place grafts instead of the old way.

    The old way was to remove skin by literally cutting a 4mm (or even 5mm in some cases) HOLE out of the dermis and discard it, while inserting a 4 or 5 mm graft of hair-bearing skin in the frontal scalp. All that new skin (the old hair transplants really were skin-grafts of hair bearing skin more than a "hair" transplant) healing inside inside frontal scalp skin (that had already been affected by the male pattern baldness-process no doubt) probably produced some massive scarring. Cobblestoning, or raised-up tissue, in the new grafts so that it felt like running your hand over a bumpy road is yet another thing men had to contend with. As the grafts healed, like any wound, scar tissue built up around the big ol' HOLE created and formed around the new thumb-tack-sized-skin grafts. They were contracted from the outside and compressed the hair in the graft to grow at a density NOT SEEN ANYWHERE ON THE SCALP NATURALLY AS FAR AS HAIRS PER SQUARE MM in the middle. This gradually caused hypoxia according to docs, but only after the middle hairs started an anagen phase...................so the plugs donutted out after the middle hairs started to independently asynchriously went into rest and shed phases. Either the newer higher pressue was too high, or revascularity inside the plug couldn't be re-achieved after a shed phase when the papilla went upwards in the dermis for the shed. Actually the first part of anagen is while the hair is still high near the skin surface. It probably stops progress in donutting "up there" and couldn't dive back down anyway. Thats what the docs believe in about donutting large plug SKIN grafts.


    Now docs just move follicular units that comprise as few as ONE SINGLE HAIR in some cases. Follicular groupings are how hair grows on the head. They tend to be larger in the back than the front though with one to five hairs, but usually just 2-3 hairs with an average of about 2.6. There are alot of 4 hair groupings though. Each and every follicular unit has a sebaceous gland, but I dont remember if each and every hair does........but I do think I remember that every hair has its own arrector pilli muscle. These days a SLIT is made in the skin (at the most advanced Doctor offices anyway) no tissue removed, and the very small new graft with just a hair, a sebaceous gland and pilli muscle that looks like a hair with just a small cylinder-'sliver' of tissue around it is put in the slit. The slit heals around the graft. Its much less traummatic...................and donor area holes in some cases are so small that the scars really cant be seen with the naked eye unless you get magnification or put your face right up next to the back of a man's shaved head. Its miles ahead of where it used to be. This is a FUE (follicular unit extraction) transplant. Strip transplants are of course still used (faster cheaper) in which a strip of flesh is cut out, the sides sewn up (with dissovable sutures) and a long donor scar is formed. The scar can stretch with these though still depending on how well an individual scars and become a pencil-sized line of tissueless flesh like a smiley face in the back of ones head, from ear to ear. It can be either inflammed pink or scar-tissue colored depending on that individuals wound-healing characteristics also. THis is an issue because if you scar badly, you will never be able to have a really short haircut.



    Im figuring ACELL (some pigs cells basically that regenrate skin tissue with hair intact in animal wounds), or wnt-protiens to wound applications, or Hair multiplication become a reality for all in less than a decade and then we can all have nice heads of hair that have donor area characteristics without fuss and worry. We will see, but the scientists certainly seem confident about this. I think a topical gene therapy that invalidates the genetic expression that makes someone male pattern baldness will take decades as the complexity of that is so intricate.
     
  5. Armando Jose

    Armando Jose Senior Member My Regimen

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    Thank you Michael for your magistral class.

    Only one thing, regarding follicular unit (FU), arrector pili and sebaceous gland.
    FU have only a single arrector pili muscle and I suposse that each hair have its sebacous gland, due hairs are asinchronous and the signals must be temporally different in each hair.

    Best regards

    Armando

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... uery_hl=11
    J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004 Aug;51(2):217-22.
    The contribution of the arrector pili muscle and sebaceous glands to the follicular unit structure.

    Poblet E, Jimenez F, Ortega F.

    Department of Pathology, Hospital General Universitario de Albacete, Universidad Las Palmas Gran Canaria, Spain.

    BACKGROUND: The evidence of hairs grouped into well-defined follicular units has given a new vision of hair anatomy and pathology. The sebaceous glands and the arrector pili muscle, as part of the pilosebaceous unit, should be viewed as important parts of this organized follicular unit structure. OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to define the morphology and the relationships between the sebaceous glands, muscles, and follicles within the context of the follicular unit structure. METHODS: This study analyzes horizontal, microscopic serial sections of large areas of normal human scalp skin stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and desmin. The course of the arrector pili muscles from their superficial origins to their follicular attachments was followed in each section, which enabled us to match each muscle with its corresponding follicular unit. RESULTS: Serial, horizontal sections show that, at the upper isthmus, the arrector pili muscle is arranged as a muscular unit structure at the periphery of each follicular unit. Then, at a lower level, the muscle divides and encircles the sebaceous gland, and penetrates between the sebaceous lobules towards the follicular attachment zone. CONCLUSION: Microphotographic evaluation of large areas of scalp is important for assessing the anatomical relationships between the sebaceous glands, arrector pili muscles, and hair follicles as components of the follicular unit. We introduce the anatomical concept of a follicular unit served by a muscular unit, which can be identified in horizontal sections made at the upper level of the isthmus. This muscular unit results from the merging of the arrector pili muscles that originate from the hair follicles contained in that particular follicular unit. This anatomical disposition suggests that the arrector pili muscles could play an important role in the integrity of the follicular unit as well as in the secretion of the sebum contents.

    PMID: 15280840 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]


    Tambien este otro trabajo similar:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/quer ... uery_hl=14
    Dermatol Surg. 2002 Sep;28(9):800-3.
    The arrector pili muscle and the follicular unit of the scalp: a microscopic anatomy study.

    Poblet E, Ortega F, Jimenez F.

    Department of Pathology, Hospital General Universitario de Albacete, Spain.

    BACKGROUND: The arrector pili muscle is a smooth muscle bundle that attaches to the bulge region of the follicle and extends to its superior attachment in the upper dermis. Hair follicles in the scalp are grouped, forming well-defined anatomic structures known as follicular units, which are composed of terminal and vellus hairs, the associated sebaceous glands, and the arrector pili muscles. OBJECTIVE: To describe the microscopic anatomy of the arrector pili muscles in relation to the follicular units, using horizontal sections of scalp skin. METHODS: Normal scalp skin was obtained from 20 adult cadavers. Tissue specimens were horizontally sectioned at all levels of depth, including the infundibulum, isthmus, and inferior segment. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and Masson's trichrome. RESULTS: The distribution of hair follicles in follicular units was only present above the insertions of the arrector pili muscles, at the infundibulum and isthmus. Masson's trichrome proved to be a very useful stain to delineate the follicular units. At the isthmus level, bulky cords of arrector pili muscle were located specifically at one pole of the follicular unit. These bulky cords appeared to be located at the same pole in different follicular units. CONCLUSION: At the isthmus level, above their follicular attachments, the arrector pili muscles that originate from their respective follicles join together, forming a single muscular structure that extends upward to its superior attachment zone. An anatomic model is proposed in which a single arrector pili muscular structure is shared by all the follicles contained within the follicular unit.

    PMID: 12269872 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
     
  6. michael barry

    michael barry Senior Member

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    Here is a picture of a follicular unit that is extracted, resting on a table. Armando is right about the sebaceous glands per hair and arrector pilli muscles per unit. I had that backwards (I dont write this stuff down---just memory).


    http://www.seagerhairtransplant.com/ima ... ion_p1.jpg

    you can see the sebacous groupings in the caulfilowered shaped glands around the hairs. No wonder we have so much oil on our skin. Comparitively speaking, those glands are pretty big. I imagine that they offer photoprotection to a balding scalp though with the oils they distribute on the skin though, icky as that may be.
     
  7. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    :D :D :D

    http://www.jcb.org/cgi/content/full/176/7/891a

     
  8. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    A boost for Foote's theory?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymphatic_system

     
  9. Armando Jose

    Armando Jose Senior Member My Regimen

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    Thank you MB. The photograph is elocuent.

    Armando
     
  10. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    Interesting...

    http://www.discount-vitamins-herbs.net/ ... rcumin.htm




    [/quote:3cdbd]
     
  11. Jkkezh

    Jkkezh Established Member

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    About the wound healing stuff:

    I've heard a story from a morrocan guy, who said his father regrew hair on his bald spot after a traditional treatment with razor blades and garlic...

    Basically they made a lot of small cuts on the bald spot and rubbed this in with chrushed garlic.

    Now I don't know about the garlic, but I think the razor blade cuts could definately do something, if made carefully they won't leave any severe scars and might promote hairgrowth because of the immuno response, increased macrophages , wnt-protein signalling...

    I'm not going to try it though.... :wink:
     
  12. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    Wounding the scalp could also cause shock-loss...? :freaked:
     
  13. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    :D :D :D

    Topical garlic for alopecia areata:

    http://www.ijdvl.com/article.asp?issn=0 ... Hajheydari

     
  14. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    http://www.raztec.com/chapter12.html

     
  15. wookster

    wookster Experienced Member

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    :eek: :eek: :eek:

    http://www.ehrs.org/conferenceabstracts ... ileika.htm

     

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