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Mechanism Of Androgenic Alopecia: Addressing Speculations Through Empirical Evidences

Discussion in 'Hair Loss and Alopecia Published Studies' started by Squeegee 2.0, Jun 13, 2020.

  1. Squeegee 2.0

    Squeegee 2.0 Established Member My Regimen

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  2. Armando Jose

    Armando Jose Senior Member My Regimen

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    https://sci-hub.tw/10.1111/dth.13120

    Althought authors and reviewers have some problem with the word finasteride (Finestride, Finesteride), they point to chronic inflammation and hormonal imbalance as the main factor of hair loss. Then appears calcification, fibrosis and problems with blood flow
    In conclusions
    " we came to the conclusion that imbalance in diet, life style, microbiome and scalp environment which lead to chronic inflammation and imbalanced T:E ratio results in increased level of scalp DHT, AR and
    imbalanced calcification regulators"

    But common baldness have a special pattern that diet and life style don`t explain

    Raymond Saboreaud detected differences regarding microbiome more than 100 years ago
     

    Attached Files:

    #2 Armando Jose, Jun 14, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2020
    badhabiz and Squeegee 2.0 like this.
  3. John Difool

    John Difool Experienced Member My Regimen

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    One statement I don't understand:

    Increase in estrogens level causes balding in men.

    Does that simply mean higher E with male level T since HRT for mtf shows hair regrowth with E. Or it's a mistake and should be T instead of E in that sentence?
     
    #3 John Difool, Jun 14, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2020
  4. Squeegee 2.0

    Squeegee 2.0 Established Member My Regimen

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    Few studies show the AR signalling is responsible for the calcification..

    These novel data demonstrate that androgens play a role in inducing vascular calcification through the AR. Androgen signalling may represent a novel potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4837411/


    This study demonstrates for the first time that calcification of advanced atherosclerotic lesions is an androgen - sensitive process and postulates potential roles for both AR- and ER-mediated pathways in androgen-induced vascular calcification.

    https://researchers.mq.edu.au/en/pu...gression-of-arterial-calcification-in-apolipo
     
    #4 Squeegee 2.0, Jun 14, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2020
  5. Squeegee 2.0

    Squeegee 2.0 Established Member My Regimen

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    Ginsenoside Rb1 ( a major component of ginseng) inhibits vascular calcification as a selective androgen receptor modulator.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0014299919304984

    Red Ginseng Extract Promotes the Hair Growth in Cultured Human Hair Follicles

    In conclusion, RGE and its ginsenosides may enhance hDPC proliferation, activate ERK and AKT signaling pathways in hDPCs, upregulate hair matrix keratinocyte proliferation, and inhibit the DHT-induced androgen receptor transcription. These results suggest that red ginseng may promote hair growth in humans.


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350143/
     
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  6. John Difool

    John Difool Experienced Member My Regimen

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    Another weak Finasteride competitor.
     
  7. Squeegee 2.0

    Squeegee 2.0 Established Member My Regimen

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  8. Squeegee 2.0

    Squeegee 2.0 Established Member My Regimen

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    They both work differently.. finasteride is a 5AR inhibitor (DHT is the product of testosterone and does not require the activity of 5α-reductase to affect hair follicles).

    Ginsenosides: affect hair growth through the regulation of androgen receptor signaling. We proved this speculation by showing that RGE and its ginsenosides inhibit the DHT-induced upregulation of androgen receptor in hDPCs...
     
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  9. John Difool

    John Difool Experienced Member My Regimen

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    @GroLocks is using RGE in his regimen. What qty are we talking about here? Oral or topical?
     
  10. GroLocks

    GroLocks New Member

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    @John Difool - It's the oral alcohol version, but, I'm using it topically. I'm using 600mg active compounds KRGe diluted in approximately 35ml of solution (all the other ingredients listed in my earlier post). Using about 12ml of this mixed solution each day. So, that would come out to approximately 200mg of KRGe topically per day.
     
  11. John Difool

    John Difool Experienced Member My Regimen

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    Where do you buy that stuff?
     
  12. Squeegee 2.0

    Squeegee 2.0 Established Member My Regimen

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  13. Dimitri001

    Dimitri001 Established Member My Regimen

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    If I'm reading this right, this is not an essential oil, is that right?

    Are there any safety concerns with this thing? One Chinese herb we discussed here turned out to be toxic for the liver.

    In these

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24613976/

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28885585/

    they mention the involvement of the Wnt signaling pathway, which I don't know much about, but I've heard is involved in cancer. Is that something to worry about?

    Can you put that into slightly plainer English, what does regulation of androgen receptor signaling mean exactly? I assume it's not the typical thing of preventing things from binding.

    UPDATE: Well, it seems that it doesn't stop DHT from binding, it just doesn't have the effect it normally does when it binds. The question is does this also have other systemic-level effects.

    It actually does have a 5ar inhibiting effect, but it promotes hairloss through a different mechanism, as well.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4350143/

    "Recently, Murata et al. reported that red ginseng and ginsenoside-Rg3 inhibit 5α-reductase and that the topical application of RGE inhibits hair regrowth suppression in testosterone-treated mice.10"
     
    #13 Dimitri001, Jul 15, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2020
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  14. Squeegee 2.0

    Squeegee 2.0 Established Member My Regimen

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    Dimitri, I do think that the Ginsenocide activates the AMPK/SIRT1 pathways.

    https://www.hindawi.com/journals/mi/2019/6453296/
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3986499/


    Ginsenosides: affect hair growth through the regulation of androgen receptor signaling. We proved this speculation by showing that RGE and its ginsenosides inhibit the DHT-induced upregulation of androgen receptor in hDPCs...

    SIRT1 is known for the deacetylation of the Androgen Receptors..

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15313417/
     
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  15. Dimitri001

    Dimitri001 Established Member My Regimen

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    The good news is, this stuff seems to be safe

    https://www.mdpi.com/2305-6320/2/2/106/pdf

    I did a superficial Google Scholar search and it seems like the only in vivo human studies are the ones mentioned in the Human Clinical Studies heading of the review Squeegee posted.

    That is to say:

    Efficacy of korean red ginseng in the treatment of alopecia areata

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23717141/

    The efficacy of 3% minoxidil vs. combined 3% minoxidil and Korean red ginseng in treating female pattern alopecia

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24451023/

    Study of the efficacy of Korean red ginseng in the treatment of androgenic alopecia

    This last one I can't find the full text of anywhere, not even on Library Genesis. If anyone can get ahold of it somehow, I'd love to read it.

    I'm excluding the one study on chemotherapy.

    So, the way it stands with this thing, as I see it is this:

    - it seems to be safe

    - there are studies showing it works in vitro, in animals and that show mechanisms by which it SHOULD work in humans

    - the in vivo human studies are such as they are

    Given all that, assuming it is affordable, seems like including it in your regimen is a no brainer.

    The question is topical or oral and what dose.

    I found this: https://escholarship.org/content/qt7s87z6cc/qt7s87z6cc.pdf

    Current recommendations for P. ginseng
    consumption by the German Commission E are 1-2
    grams per day. Adverse effects may occur when
    consuming greater than 3 grams of ginseng per day
    and depression and confusion may occur in those
    consuming over 15 grams daily [8].

    @GroLocks, how did you decide on your dose and how did you decide on topical rather than oral?

    UPDATE: New evidence on topical safety

    https://escholarship.org/content/qt7s87z6cc/qt7s87z6cc.pdf

    Cutaneous adverse effects related to ginseng use
    include alopecia, angioedema, bullous eruption,
    dermatitis, erythema multiforme, pruritus, Stevens-
    Johnson syndrome, unspecific rash, urticaria, and
    vasculitis (Box 1), [1-10]. In the two-year follow-up
    study by Siegel et al., 25% of individuals developed
    cutaneous eruptions that were corroborated by
    physical examination [7].
     
    #15 Dimitri001, Jul 19, 2020
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2020

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