In Your Opinion, What Unreleased Product Has The Most Potential For Hairloss?

DJC

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There are a lot of new products on the horizon, with the majority probably being ineffective.

Any that are promising though? I was hyped about replicel but that seems to have been a bust.
 

Derelict

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I guess shiseido or CB.. They both have shown some results. Could be nice combining them.

Not sure what else is coming fast enough and has decent results.

Weren't the studies done on CB come out as quite bad at the 12 month mark or something? sorry i forget.
 

sonictemples

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Weren't the studies done on CB come out as quite bad at the 12 month mark or something? sorry i forget.

I assume it was similar to finasterise at 6 month mark which is revolutionary, then the efficacy dropped below finasteride at 12 month mark
 

pegasus2

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There's nothing too exciting on the horizon except for Tsuji and Tissuse. Stemson won't be on the market for a long time. Other upcoming products are available now on the black market, or have stronger alternatives that are already available. Follica is the biggest thing coming, and you can do that at home right now.
 

cesc

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I used to think like this, but honestly hair transplants are so effective now it would be stupid not to pursue

A friend had one done late last year, he was a diffuse thinner in the classic male pattern baldness areas (crown, temples, mid section) and around 7 months later he's nearly a fullhead again. Sure the density isnt quite there but its a huge improvement and it only cost €3200

Its really transofrmed his hair, and realistically it was only the first three months where it looked like sh*t. Now he has the illusion of near full density, and no normal person would say hey this guy is balding/thinning.

Its the only real long term solution we have right now, and for the vast majority of people it produces results. Take a look at JohnnyL's posts in the FUE forum.
 

TK421

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I used to think like this, but honestly hair transplants are so effective now it would be stupid not to pursue

A friend had one done late last year, he was a diffuse thinner in the classic male pattern baldness areas (crown, temples, mid section) and around 7 months later he's nearly a fullhead again. Sure the density isnt quite there but its a huge improvement and it only cost €3200

Its really transofrmed his hair, and realistically it was only the first three months where it looked like sh*t. Now he has the illusion of near full density, and no normal person would say hey this guy is balding/thinning.

Its the only real long term solution we have right now, and for the vast majority of people it produces results. Take a look at JohnnyL's posts in the FUE forum.


What Norwood was he? Hard to believe a diffuse thinner would have enough donor hair to make that much of a cosmetic difference.


It's never over. I'll win this war if I have to steal your follicles and transplant them to my scalp.


I've been wondering if it were possible to get a hair transplant using someone else's hair. Would the body reject someone else's follicles if you were the same race/ethnicity and blood type? What if the person who donated their hair was a family member? How awesome would that be if this were possible. I'm sure there's alot of older guys with a full head of hair that would be interested in selling some of their hair.
 

pegasus2

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What Norwood was he? Hard to believe a diffuse thinner would have enough donor hair to make that much of a cosmetic difference.





I've been wondering if it were possible to get a hair transplant using someone else's hair. Would the body reject someone else's follicles if you were the same race/ethnicity and blood type? What if the person who donated their hair was a family member? How awesome would that be if this were possible. I'm sure there's alot of older guys with a full head of hair that would be interested in selling some of their hair.

Jahoda did it more than 20 years ago. Hair follicles are immune privileged, meaning they don't get attacked by the immune system except in alopecia areata. That's why JAK inhibitors never stood much chance of working for Androgenetic Alopecia, because it's not immune related like AA.
 
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TK421

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Jahoda did it 30 years ago. Hair follicles are immune privileged, meaning they don't get attacked by the immune system except in alopecia areata. That's why JAK inhibitors never stood much chance of working for Androgenetic Alopecia, because it's not immune related like AA.


What is the reason why hair transplant clinics aren't doing this? I'm sure there are alot of guys out there that would be willing to sell some of their hair.
 

pegasus2

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What is the reason why hair transplant clinics aren't doing this? I'm sure there are alot of guys out there that would be willing to sell some of their hair.

I don't know. Jahoda implanted his DSC cells into his wife's arm, but they removed the follicles after two or three months I think. They didn't let them cycle, so they don't even know if they will grow back after the first cycle ends. Anyways, we will soon be able to clone and implant our own hairs so it doesn't matter. This is better than trying to find someone whose hair matches, and risking rejection if it doesn't work, because it won't work for everyone. I imagine for ethnic guys this would be easier. For instance if you're black it probably wouldn't be hard to find some poor guy in a third-world country with identical hair that would be happy to give it to you for ten grand. There are ethical concerns there, but there are countries where I'm sure it could be done. Whites have a much greater variability in hair color and texture, so finding a match might be difficult.
 

TK421

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I don't know. Jahoda implanted his DSC cells into his wife's arm, but they removed the follicles after two or three months I think. They didn't let them cycle, so they don't even know if they will grow back after the first cycle ends. Anyways, we will soon be able to clone and implant our own hairs so it doesn't matter. This is better than trying to find someone whose hair matches, and risking rejection if it doesn't work, because it won't work for everyone.


Good point, not to mention the extra $$ you'd lose paying for someone else's hair only to have your body reject it for whatever reason. How much longer until cloning is available? Haven't been keeping up as I've lost hope.
 

pegasus2

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Good point, not to mention the extra $$ you'd lose paying for someone else's hair only to have your body reject it for whatever reason. How much longer until cloning is available? Haven't been keeping up as I've lost hope.

Who knows. Maybe a couple years, maybe ten years. There are a lot of companies working on it now. Tsuji/RIKEN is getting close, they were supposed to start human trials this year. Tissuse is looking for a cell processing center to run their trials. Either or both of those could be available on a limited basis within a couple years.
 

Throwaway94

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Jahoda did it more than 20 years ago. Hair follicles are immune privileged, meaning they don't get attacked by the immune system except in alopecia areata. That's why JAK inhibitors never stood much chance of working for Androgenetic Alopecia, because it's not immune related like AA.

Maybe certain follicle cells don't trigger rejection but when follicular units are taken from the donor they will definitely come with extra tissue that will cause rejection. It might be possible if the cells involved in that process can be selectively removed but it adds a huge amount of complexity to the procedure.

If they figure it out I'll hunt down a homeless man with nice soft brown hair ASAP.
 

pegasus2

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Maybe certain follicle cells don't trigger rejection but when follicular units are taken from the donor they will definitely come with extra tissue that will cause rejection. It might be possible if the cells involved in that process can be selectively removed but it adds a huge amount of complexity to the procedure.

If they figure it out I'll hunt down a homeless man with nice soft brown hair ASAP.

Yes, that complexity would greatly add to the cost of the procedure. It would be closer to the cost of hair cloning than to a traditional transplant, and with no guarantees.
 
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