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Small Molecule Wnt Pathway Modulators From Natural Sources: History, State Of The Art & Perspectives

Discussion in 'New Research, Studies, and Technologies' started by Poppyburner, Jun 5, 2020.

  1. Poppyburner

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    [Published March 2nd, 2020:]

    'Abstract:
    The Wnt signaling is one of the major pathways known to regulate embryonic development,
    tissue renewal and regeneration in multicellular organisms. Dysregulations of the pathway are a
    common cause of several types of cancer and other diseases, such as osteoporosis and rheumatoid
    arthritis. This makes Wnt signaling an important therapeutic target. Small molecule activators and
    inhibitors of signaling pathways are important biomedical tools which allow one to harness signaling
    processes in the organism for therapeutic purposes in affordable and specific ways. Natural products
    are a well known source of biologically active small molecules with therapeutic potential. In this article,
    we provide an up-to-date overview of existing small molecule modulators of the Wnt pathway
    derived from natural products.
    In the first part of the review, we focus on Wnt pathway activators,
    which can be used for regenerative therapy in various tissues such as skin, bone, cartilage and the
    nervous system. The second part describes inhibitors of the pathway, which are desired agents for
    targeted therapies against different cancers. In each part, we pay specific attention to the mechanisms
    of action of the natural products, to the models on which they were investigated, and to the potential
    of different taxa to yield bioactive molecules capable of regulating the Wnt signaling.

    [...]

    Aiming at a new hair growth-promoting drug, a screen of 800 extracts was conducted using the TOPFlash assay in HEK293 cells, and hits were tested for the ability to promote hair growth in cell-based and mouse models. Extracts from Aconitum ciliare were among the most active both in the TOPFlash and hair growth assays, positioning this medicinal plant for the identification of a promising Wnt activator [78]. Flavonoids from the plant Vernonia anthelmintica and their derivative emerged as Wnt pathway activators for melanin synthesis in vitiligo—a sickness manifested as skin depigmentation [41]. As a potential mechanism, phosphorylation and thus inhibition of GSK3β via crosstalk with the PI3K/Akt pathway was pinpointed [41]. In this context, it is interesting to mention that tobacco smoking-caused skin pigmentation was shown to increase β-catenin levels, the activity linked to the tobacco plant (Nicotiana tabacum) metabolites [79].

    [...]

    Extracts of Undariopsis peterseniana, edible brown algae, were tested in hair growth models in a search for drug candidates against androgenic alopecia and found to stimulate ex vivo hair-fiber growth in rat vibrissa follicles as well as in vivo hair growth in mice. It showed an increase in β-catenin accumulation and GSK3β phosphorylation in dermal papilla cells [98].'

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7140537/
    https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4409/9/3/589/pdf
     
    #1 Poppyburner, Jun 5, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2020
    polishkickbuttowski likes this.
  2. joni106

    joni106 Established Member My Regimen

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    Thanks for that.
    I couldn't find any herb extract or any product on the web that could buy
    Maybe it's because of my English.
    Do you know something?
    I use emu oil and castor oil after microneedling and i want to add something that can promote wnt.
     
  3. Poppyburner

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    #3 Poppyburner, Jun 29, 2020
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2020
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  4. joni106

    joni106 Established Member My Regimen

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    Its different from methyl vanillate?
     
  5. Seuxin

    Seuxin Established Member

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    All theses studies are sh*t. There is tons of studies with natural ingredients / herbal on pubmed....sh*t, sh*t and sh*t ! Only synthetical molecules will be the way !
     
  6. Poppyburner

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    Regarding this from 2016?:

    'Topical Application of the Wnt/β-catenin Activator Methyl Vanillate Increases Hair Count and Hair Mass Index in Women With Androgenetic Alopecia'

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27121450/


    'Methyl vanillate is considered to be a slightly soluble (in water) acidic compound. Methyl vanillate can be synthesized from vanillic acid. Methyl vanillate has been identified in foods such as cow's milk (PMID: 4682334) and beer(PMID: 20800742).

    Methyl vanillate is a benzoate ester that is the methyl ester of vanillic acid. It has a role as an antioxidant and a plant metabolite. It is a benzoate ester, a member of phenols and an aromatic ether. It derives from a vanillic acid.'

    https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Methyl-vanillate
     
  7. joni106

    joni106 Established Member My Regimen

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    yes
     
    Poppyburner likes this.

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