Microbiome In The Hair Follicle Of Androgenetic Alopecia Patients | HairLossTalk Forums
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Microbiome In The Hair Follicle Of Androgenetic Alopecia Patients

Discussion in 'Hair Loss and Alopecia Published Studies' started by Squeegee 2.0, May 3, 2019.

  1. Squeegee 2.0

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    Abstract
    Androgenetic alopecia is the most common form of hair loss in males. It is a multifactorial condition involving genetic predisposition and hormonal changes. The role of microflora during hair loss remains to be understood. We therefore analyzed the microbiome of hair follicles from hair loss patients and the healthy. Hair follicles were extracted from occipital and vertex region of hair loss patients and healthy volunteers and further dissected into middle and lower compartments. The microbiome was then characterized by 16S rRNA sequencing. Distinct microbial population were found in the middle and lower compartment of hair follicles. Middle hair compartment was predominated by Burkholderia spp. and less diverse; while higher bacterial diversity was observed in the lower hair portion. Occipital and vertex hair follicles did not show significant differences. In hair loss patients, miniaturized vertex hair houses elevated Propionibacterium acnes in the middle and lower compartments while non-miniaturized hair of other regions were comparable to the healthy. Increased abundance of P. acnes in miniaturized hair follicles could be associated to elevated immune response gene expression in the hair follicle.

    https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0216330
     
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  2. Squeegee 2.0

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    We reported distinct microbial population in the middle and lower portion of the hair follicle. Burkholderia genera predominates the middle portion while higher microbial diversity was observed in the lower portion. In Androgenetic Alopecia patients, miniaturized patient vertex hair houses elevated P. acnes while hair from other regions were comparable. This is the first study characterizing the microbiome in Androgenetic Alopecia and provides new insight into the condition.
     
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  3. Squeegee 2.0

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    Is Propionibacterium Acnes Associated with Hair Casts and Alopecia?
    Abstract
    We report a series of four patients who presented with complaints of diffuse non-scarring alopecia. They had similar clinical features of alopecia, hyperseborrhea, and distinct keratinaceous hair casts that encircled the hair shafts. Propionibacterium acnes was isolated from two of the patients’ scalp, and Gram-positive, Giemsa-positive bacteria were seen in the hair follicles in the scalp biopsy of one of the patients. The patients’ symptoms did not respond to standard treatment for seborrheic dermatitis, but responded to a course of systemic antibiotics targeting P. acnes. We propose a role for P. acnes colonization of the terminal hair follicles in the pathogenesis of hair casts, and possibly diffuse non-scarring alopecia. Possible mechanisms of pathogenesis are discussed with a literature review.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3500081/

     
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  4. Squeegee 2.0

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    Cutaneous immunopathology of androgenetic alopecia.
    Abstract
    Male pattern baldness is assumed to result from a combination of normal serum concentrations of androgen and an appropriate genetic background. To study whether inflammation contributes to the development of androgenetic alopecia, direct immunofluorescence and dermatopathologic studies were performed on biopsy specimens from bald scalp of patients, with specimens from uninvolved scalp of these patients or from scalp of volunteers who were not bald serving as controls. Granular deposits of Immunoglobulin M or C3 (or both) were found at the basement membrane in 25 (96%) of 26 study patients and 1 (12%) of 8 control subjects. Granular C3 was also deposited on eccrine myoepithelial cells in 8 (31%) of 26 study patients, but no control subjects. Porphyrins were found in the pilosebaceous canal in 15 (58%) of 26 study subjects and in 1 (12%) of 8 control subjects. These results support an inflammatory pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia. Propionibacterium acnes is known to produce porphyrins. Ultraviolet radiation may excite microbiologic porphyrins that could activate C3 and, subsequently, the complement cascade producing inflammatory mediators.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1744007
     
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  5. Squeegee 2.0

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  6. getting_back

    getting_back Established Member My Regimen

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    Very interesting.. Thank you
     
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  7. Mandar kumthekar

    Mandar kumthekar Experienced Member My Regimen

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