Does Anyone Ever Get Over AA | HairLossTalk Forums

Does Anyone Ever Get Over AA

Discussion in 'Alopecia Areata' started by Caryyn, Jul 11, 2006.

  1. Caryyn

    Caryyn New Member

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    Hi my name is Caryyn. I have AA with full regrowth. I guess my question here is that not a day goes by that I don't think about AA. It has taken over my life for well over a year and a half now. I thought it might get easier with time. I worry that I may lose my hair again. Anyone else go through this.
     
  2. wawawa2

    wawawa2 New Member

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    Caryyn ~

    Having AA is a life altering experience... you will never view your hair in the same light you once did... You will wonder if it will fall out again but with each day that passes, you will worry less and less... and if it DOES happen, you will be stronger the next time than you were the last...
     
  3. Apparition

    Apparition New Member

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    I was thinking about the same thing. How can you tell if your AA is gone for good? Or will it come back? I guess one never knows.
     
  4. Caryyn

    Caryyn New Member

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    Thanks for responding.

    My parents told me I had a bald spot when I was about 4 or 5 but it grew back and then stayed in remission until I turned 46. So I'm guessing we may never know if AA will be gone for good. I doubt it. I think once we have it, we have it - hopefully we'll know our triggers and be careful we don't tip the iceberg again.
     
  5. Apparition

    Apparition New Member

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    No problem.

    I guess what we have to remember is we aren't getting any younger. We need to live life while it's worth living. I'm glad to hear about your regrowth and you need to focus on that because that is something some people will never see.
     
  6. jillybean

    jillybean New Member

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    Positive info. to hear that some people really do have regrowth. How long did it take to regrow?
     
  7. luvm3hair

    luvm3hair New Member

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    Re:

     
  8. Littlenola

    Littlenola New Member

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    YES! With AA you ALWAYS have the potential for remission! New studies have possibly found a genetic marker similar to that of those with rheumatoid arthritis, celiac and lupus I believe. The hope is that by having found the marker more research and testing can be done. Chaco out the National Alopecia foundations website, for latest info. We are getting there! Also, I have lost up to 60% of my hair at once and had almost full regrowth.
     
  9. dsadarkrai

    dsadarkrai New Member

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    I got it when I was 8 years old and still have it.. i hate it so much
     
  10. LAHairBoutique

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    HAIR HELP FROM A SPECIALIST!!!

    I own a damage free hairpiece and extensions company in SC and would love to help you. I custom cut and color pieces to match customers hair perfectly! Please look me up on FB I ship all over the country! Ashtyn Tinsley Guest L.A. Hair Boutique 864-590-8924
     
  11. elixir86

    elixir86 New Member

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    Am I facing AA?

    Am I facing AA?
     

    Attached Files:

  12. I.D WALKER

    I.D WALKER Senior Member

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    I'm not an expert, but if you meant Androgenetic Alopecia then from what I can see I would say definitely yes. Don't go by me though get an expert evaluation asap so you can start finasteride./minoxidil. treatment and hopefully you'll preserve/maintain your existing hair. Don't wait if you can help it. All the best luck.
     
  13. WhitePolarBear

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    Nope, this is female pattern baldness.

    Yes it can also occur in men.
     
  14. I.D WALKER

    I.D WALKER Senior Member

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    See an expert either way.




    What is female pattern hair loss?
    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a distinctive form of hair loss that occurs in women with androgenetic alopecia. Many women are affected by

    FPHL. In fact, around 40% of women by age 50 show signs of hair loss and less than 45% of women actually reach the age of 80 with a full head of hair.
    In FPHL, there is diffuse thinning of hair on the scalp due to increased hair shedding or a reduction in hair volume, or both. It is normal to lose up to 50-100 hairs a day. Another condition called chronic telogen effluvium also presents with increased hair shedding and is often confused with FPHL. It is important to differentiate between these conditions as management for both conditions differ.
    FPHL presents quite differently from the more easily recognizable male pattern baldness, which usually begins with a receding frontal hairline that progresses to a bald patch on top of the head. It is very uncommon for women to bald following the male pattern unless there is excessive production of androgens in the body.
    [TABLE="class: images"]
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    Images courtesy of R. Sinclair, FACD
    What causes female pattern hair loss?

    FPHL has a strong genetic predisposition. The mode of inheritance is polygenic, indicating that there are many genes that contribute to FPHL, and these genes could be inherited from either parent, or both. Genetic testing to assess risk of balding is currently not recommended, as it is unreliable.
    Currently, it is not clear if androgens (male sex hormones) play a role in FPHL, although androgens have a clear role in male pattern baldness. The majority of women with FPHL have normal levels of androgens in their bloodstream. Due to this uncertain relationship, the term FPHL is preferred to ‘female androgenetic alopecia’.
    The role of oestrogen is uncertain. FPHL is more common after the menopause suggesting oestrogens may be stimulatory for hair growth. But laboratory experiments have also suggested oestrogens may suppress hair growth.
    What is the normal hair growth cycle?

    Everyone is born with a fixed number of hair follicles on the scalp that produce hairs throughout life. Hair grows from the base of the follicle at a rate of about one centimetre a month for about three years. This growth phase is called anagen. After anagen, the hair dies (catagen hair) and no longer grows. It sits dormant in the follicle for a three-month phase called telogen. After telogen, the hair follicle undergoes another anagen phase to produce a new hair that grows out of the same follicle. As it grows, the old telogen hair is dislodged or pushed out. This is a cycle that continues throughout life.
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    Image © 1998 Merck Sharpe & Dohme (with permission)
    Hair shedding

    Increased hair shedding or telogen effluvium is a feature to FPHL. Women can use the hair shedding guide below to define whether hair shedding is normal or excessive,
    To assess hair shedding, women should choose which of the 6 photographs of hair bundles best represents how much hair they shed on an average day.
    Doctors can use the hair shedding scale to score hair loss at each patient visit to assess response to treatment. It can also be used in clinical trials to assess new treatments for excess hair shedding.
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    [TH="colspan: 2"]Baseline shedding scores[/TH]
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    [TD]Excessive[/TD]
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    Images courtesy of R. Sinclair, FACD
    Hair miniaturisation

    Unlike other areas of the body, hairs on the scalp to grow in tufts of 3–4. In androgenetic alopecia the tufts progressively lose hairs. Eventually when all the hairs in the tuft are gone, bald scalp appears between the hairs.
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    Image courtesy of R. Sinclair, FACD
    How long does it take for FPHL to progress?

    FPHL can affect women in any age group but it occurs more commonly after menopause. The hair loss process is not constant and usually occurs in fits and bursts. It is not uncommon to have accelerated phases of hair loss for 3-6 months, followed by periods of stability lasting 6-18 months. Without medication, it tends to progress in severity over the next few decades of life.
    What are the effects of female pattern hair loss?

    Many studies have shown that hair loss is not merely a cosmetic issue, but it also causes significant psychological distress. Compared to unaffected women, those affected have a more negative body image and are less able to cope with daily functioning. Hair loss can be associated with low self-esteem, depression, introversion, and feelings of unattractiveness. It is especially hard to live in a society that places great value on youthful appearance and attractiveness.
    Should I have any hormone tests done?

    Your doctor may arrange blood tests that include female and male sex hormone levels as well as thyroid function, as part of the diagnostic workup for your hair loss.
    The majority of women affected by FPHL do not have underlying hormonal abnormalities. However a few women with FPHL are found to have excessive levels of androgens. These women tend also to suffer from acne, irregular menses and excessive facial and body hair. These symptoms are characteristic of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) although the majority of women with PCOS do not experience hair loss. Less often, congenital adrenal hyperplasia may be responsible.
    What treatments are available?

    Treatments are available for FPHL although there is no cure. It is important to manage expectations when seeking treatment, as the aim is to slow or stop the progression of hair loss rather than to promote hair regrowth. However, some women do experience hair regrowth with treatment. Results are variable and it is not possible to predict who may or may not benefit from treatment.
    A Cochrane systematic review published in 2012 concluded that minoxidil solution was effective for FPHL. Minoxidil is available as 2% and 5% solutions; the stronger preparation is more likely to irritate and may cause undesirable hair growth unintentionally on areas other than the scalp.
    Hormonal treatment, i.e. oral medications that block the effects of androgens (e.g. spironolactone, cyproterone, finasteride and flutamide) is also often tried.
    Once started, treatment needs to continue for at least six months before the benefits can be assessed, and it is important not to stop treatment without discussing it with your doctor first. Long term treatment is usually necessary to sustain the benefits.
    Cosmetic camouflages include coloured hair sprays to cover thinning areas on the scalp, hair bulking fibre powder, and hair wigs. Hair transplantation for FPHL is becoming more popular although not everyone is suitable for this procedure.
    Low level laser therapy is of unproven benefit in pattern balding but one device has been approved by the FDA for marketing. Further studies are required to determine the magnitude of the benefit, if any.
    Where do I go to seek help?

    Your first stop would be to see your general practitioner (GP) who can perform a medical workup to exclude other reasons for hair loss. Your GP can refer you to a dermatologist for further management of FPHL. Sometimes, it may be necessary for your doctor to perform a scalp biopsy to confirm this diagnosis.
    It is important to seek reliable information and advice from authoritative sources as there are many bogus treatments that are expensive and do not work.
    Related information

    References:


    [HR][/HR]
     
  15. elixir86

    elixir86 New Member

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    I am very much concerned about the state of my hair. :(

    What kind of baldness am i facing?

    How can i find if this is temporary due to stress or due to dieting/lack of proper nutrition?
     
  16. WhitePolarBear

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    The loss only located at the top of your head, so you can rule out stress and nutrition already.

    You can clearly see a "pattern". This is the female one. And it's caused by androgens just like male pattern baldness.

    So your best bet here is to get on proven treatments: finasteride and/or minoxidil.

    Don't get stuck in the denial stage too long. The more you wait to get on treatments, the more hair you will irremediably lose.
     
  17. elixir86

    elixir86 New Member

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    i will take your say, not be in denial.

    ive been starving myself to lose weight. I am on less than 1000 Kcal/day diet. i am worried if that could be aggravating my hair loss. Don't start bashing me for my food habits. :(
     
  18. WhitePolarBear

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    Your hair loss is 100% genetic so no, losing weight won't affect the balding process.
     
  19. elixir86

    elixir86 New Member

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    Thanks. My dad also started losing hair like me around same age.
     
  20. I.D WALKER

    I.D WALKER Senior Member

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    I'm sort of surprised you never saw it coming. The symptoms (Denial) can be worse than the disease itself.
     

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