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A Very Rare Complication: New Hair Growth Around Healing Wounds

Discussion in 'Hair Loss and Alopecia Published Studies' started by Poppyburner, Jun 2, 2020.

  1. Poppyburner

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    [The Journal of International Medical Research, 2009]

    'We present the case of a patient in whom active new hair growth occurred around a wound after healing. This very rare phenomenon has not previously been reported in the literature. We postulate that, after the epidermis and hair follicles have been damaged by wounding, it is possible for them naturally to heal and repair if provided with an appropriate chemical and physical microenvironment. This hypothesis may inspire new thinking in the management of alopecia, tissue engineering and the regeneration of other organs.

    Introduction

    Active new hair growth around wounds is a very rare phenomenon and, as far as we are aware, there have been no previous published clinical reports on this. Although epidermis that is lost on injury can regenerate, the loss of adult hair follicles has, until now, been considered permanent. 1,2 If, however, an appropriate chemical and physical microenvironment is provided after wounding it may be that hair follicles can develop anew. 3,4 The case that we report of a man who requested medical attention for sudden increased hair growth around facial scar tissue after a boiling water scald injury to the area is, therefore, highly unusual and may inspire new thinking in the management of alopecia, tissue engineering and the regeneration of other organs.

    Case report

    A 25-year-old man requested medical attention for a sudden increase in hair growth on the left cheek (Fig. 1). The patient reported that he had scalded himself on the left cheek with boiling water 1 year previously, but then left the wound open while it was healing. Eight months later, he noticed hair growing around the scar tissue that grew faster than his moustache but caused no sensation. He shaved several times but the hair continued to grow. Histological analysis of the tissue around the wounds showed new hair follicle formation but no other distinct changes in the subcutaneous tissue (Fig. 2). The man had no history of endocrine disorders and an overall medical examination showed he was healthy.

    Screen Shot 2020-06-03 at 05.39.23.png

    https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/147323000903700236
     
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  2. TomRiddle

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  3. John Difool

    John Difool Experienced Member My Regimen

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    Gesuuuus. I hope no one on the forum tried pouring boiling water on their scalp to get regrowth.
     
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  4. TomRiddle

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    To late i already tried it i have another head now
     
  5. Poppyburner

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    '[...] he sustained full thickness burns [...]'

    Aka Third Degree.

    Ouch!
    burn.jpeg

    The following's quite old (1991) but imo interesting:

    'Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) in Burn Patients

    Abstract

    Variations in growth factor IGF-1 levels during wound healing were assessed in 23 patients with burns of varying extent and severity. The patients were followed during the postburn period and the IGF-1 levels were regularly measured by radioimmunoassay. All patients with large burns had reduced IGF-1 levels which correlated with the surface area of burn. The most plausible reason for the suppressed IGF-1 level in these patients may be diffusion from the burned skin as we have found a strong correlation between IGF-1 and serum albumin. The reduced IGF-1 levels may contribute to impaired wound healing in these patients.'

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1930660/
     
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  6. TomRiddle

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    Very interesting thank for sharing
     
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