dNovo new promissing player in the stemcell race

froggy7

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IN THEORY, it could give you a juvenile hairline with juvenile density so does many other treatments in the pipeline (like HMI) but until we see human results this are all speculation.
in theory :) nothing is known about the quality of this hair, its thickness, etc.
 

Raccooner

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IMO they will start q2 2023 if the preclinical succeeds. This is a paradigm shifting technology, they are adding the yamanaka factors without the cancer component and turn off the process before the cell lose their identity . FDA won't give permission easily since they will be directly doing the process in human not like dnovo.
I wish the FDA would disappear. Without them we might actually get somewhere eventually.

Actually, they claim they've had success for hair on their web site in preclinicals but they don't state in what animal. If it's mice, that's next to zero then as far as I'm concerned.
 

Roeysdomi

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I wish the FDA would disappear. Without them we might actually get somewhere eventually.

Actually, they claim they've had success for hair on their web site in preclinicals but they don't state in what animal. If it's mice, that's next to zero then as far as I'm concerned.
Fda is protect you from another brozuto
 

Super Metroid

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I wish the FDA would disappear. Without them we might actually get somewhere eventually.

Actually, they claim they've had success for hair on their web site in preclinicals but they don't state in what animal. If it's mice, that's next to zero then as far as I'm concerned.
Many countries have much less strict drug approval protocol, so companies that want to move fast can go to market in Japan, Korea etc. As a customer, you can choose to have a procedure over there, on your own risk.

Although I am not American, I am happy that there is this strict organization that gives a credible stamp of approval on safety and efficacy of medical products / treatments.
 

Roeysdomi

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Many countries have much less strict drug approval protocol, so companies that want to move fast can go to market in Japan, Korea etc. As a customer, you can choose to have a procedure over there, on your own risk.

Although I am not American, I am happy that there is this strict organization that gives a credible stamp of approval on safety and efficacy of medical products / treatments.
People think that FDA prevent you from getting good drug . If its good and safe it will pass the FDA easily. For example HRT is very effective but not safe . Bruzoto safe but was a scam . Both treatment should not be approved to the public.
 

JohnDoe5

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Just injecting the cells on human heads doesn’t regrow hair. It was tried before, and failed. You will see.

Bzzt! Wrong. Decades ago Dr. Jahoda injected his hair-induced cells into his wife's arm and his injected cells grew hair on her arm.
 

JohnDoe5

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That interview was Ernesto like answering like 3 questions via email very obtusely

So their current method consists of taking a strip of skin and “placing” “induced” stem cells on it? What does it even mean?
By induced stem calls he means that the cells are induced to grow hair.

Hair cells also function as skin cells and when hair cells are cultured numerous times they turn into cells that grow skin. That is the problem. They can't culture your hair cells a lot and create more hair cells because your hair cells lose hair-indictivity in numerous culture passes. The cells can survive as hair cells for a couple passes but that is all. And it isn't enough. They have to be able to do a lot of culturing in order to create enough cells to regrow a lot of hair. And In order to grow hair the cells must be hair induced.
 

Joxy

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Bzzt! Wrong. Decades ago Dr. Jahoda injected his hair-induced cells into his wife's arm and his injected cells grew hair on her arm.
So? Why he didn’t put his hair-induced cells on his wife head? And, why after 15 years Dr. Jahoda still doesn’t have 1 product on hair loss market?

DNovo method is too invasive and too complicated for practical use. I don’t believe this company will bring something to the market.
 

Raccooner

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So? Why he didn’t put his hair-induced cells on his wife head? And, why after 15 years Dr. Jahoda still doesn’t have 1 product on hair loss market?
That's what I'd like to know.
 

Joxy

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I wish the FDA would disappear. Without them we might actually get somewhere eventually.

Actually, they claim they've had success for hair on their web site in preclinicals but they don't state in what animal. If it's mice, that's next to zero then as far as I'm concerned.
FDA is very good thing.
 

Joxy

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That's what I'd like to know.
It is very simple. His technology was not good enough to start company and bring it to the market. Because scientific research and bringing actual treatment to clinical use are totally different thing.
 

JohnDoe5

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So? Why he didn’t put his hair-induced cells on his wife head? And, why after 15 years Dr. Jahoda still doesn’t have 1 product on hair loss market?

DNovo method is too invasive and too complicated for practical use. I don’t believe this company will bring something to the market.
1. I don't know why he didn't put his induced cells on his wife's head but it's probably because she already had a full head of hair so he wouldn't be able to discern if the injected cells produced more hair growth. By injecting the cells where she had very little hair the new hairs were easy to see.

2. The reason that Jahoda and nobody else has a product on the hair loss market yet is because nobody up until now has been able to solve this inductivity problem. It has taken years to solve this problem and I'm not even 100% sure anyone has solved this problem yet.
 

JohnDoe5

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It is very simple. His technology was not good enough to start company and bring it to the market. Because scientific research and bringing actual treatment to clinical use are totally different thing.

The reason he hasn't bring a product to market is because the only way such a treatment would be practical is if they could remove just a few cells from a person's head and then culture many many copies of those few cell. They haven't been able to do that because those cells lose their hair inductivity in multiple pass culture. That's why they need to crack the code for preserving inductivity during multiple pass culture. This company says they've figured out how to do that. IMO they should take their technology into studies NOW!
 

Raccooner

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The reason he hasn't bring a product to market is because the only way such a treatment would be practical is if they could remove just a few cells from a person's head and then culture many many copies of those few cell. They haven't been able to do that because those cells lose their hair inductivity in multiple pass culture. That's why they need to crack the code for preserving inductivity during multiple pass culture. This company says they've figured out how to do that. IMO they should take their technology into studies NOW!
Which company? Perhaps you could contact them? If people here reach out, maybe we could get somewhere. You can't expect the scientists to know everything.
 

Joxy

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Chinese scientists (with help from their UK partners) for the first time in history created totipotent 8-cell stage embryo-like cells. Plus, in vivo. This is huge breakthrough for science in future. Totipotent stem cells are much powerful than iPSCs, and can give rise to the whole organism.



I hope this kind of things will also affect hair loss research. I am not scientist or very familiar, but can we create much easier hair follicles using totipotent stem cells?
 
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JohnDoe5

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Which company? Perhaps you could contact them? If people here reach out, maybe we could get somewhere. You can't expect the scientists to know everything.
The company is the one being talked about in this thread - d'Novo
 

pegasus2

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Fda is protect you from another brozuto
No one needs protecting from Brotzu. It's not dangerous, and the FDA has no authority over it. The FDA is supposed to be there to protect us from dangerous drugs. It does that, but what it also does is drive up the cost of development, preventing life-saving drugs from ever being explored because the cost of development is too high. If it wasn't for the Chinese we wouldn't be getting Bayer's PRLR antibody because the FDA stifles R&D. It needs major reform to reduce the regulatory burden and speed up the process so it serves to enable R&D rather than enriching megacap biotechs by preventing better drugs from coming to market. Finasteride should have been obsolete a decade ago, yet Merck is still making billions from it thanks to the FDA.
 

Raccooner

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No one needs protecting from Brotzu. It's not dangerous, and the FDA has no authority over it. The FDA is supposed to be there to protect us from dangerous drugs. It does that, but what it also does is drive up the cost of development, preventing life-saving drugs from ever being explored because the cost of development is too high. If it wasn't for the Chinese we wouldn't be getting Bayer's PRLR antibody because the FDA stifles R&D. It needs major reform to reduce the regulatory burden and speed up the process so it serves to enable R&D rather than enriching megacap biotechs by preventing better drugs from coming to market. Finasteride should have been obsolete a decade ago, yet Merck is still making billions from it thanks to the FDA.
If the FDA is a protection racket then they need to be disbanded. I think they shouldn't have the final say of what can and cannot be permitted. pegasus2 gave really good examples why we would be better off without the FDA overall. I think there's no problem if the FDA wishes to recommend or not of certain products or procedures but they should not be involved in determining who gets to do what kind of research. The USA is falling behind in research advances compared to other countries due to their interference. Wish there was a way to get them off our backs. They are a medical mafia.
 
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