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Visible red light enhances physiological anagen entry in vivo

Discussion in 'Hair Loss and Alopecia Published Studies' started by IDW2BB, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. IDW2BB

    IDW2BB Established Member

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    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25557083



     
  2. persistentone

    persistentone Established Member

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    Why is no one following up on red light therapy? I found this study that suggests red light increases hair baseline by 39%. Given all of the other profound benefits showing up in the research literature for red light, this seems like an area people should be testing at home.
     
  3. Pigeon

    Pigeon Senior Member My Regimen

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    Did you test it?
     
    tomJ likes this.
  4. persistentone

    persistentone Established Member

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    I am in the process of researching red light therapy to improve skin quality and improve bioenergetics. I just happened to realize that the same principles and ability to deeply penetrate the dermis might make it a great therapy for male pattern baldness. Once I found that study I came here and was shocked that no one is trying this.

    I will be buying whole body red light panels for my other therapies, so I will probably spend 10 minutes a day illuminating the scalp too.
     
  5. Murkey Thumb

    Murkey Thumb Experienced Member My Regimen

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  6. persistentone

    persistentone Established Member

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    The typical panel products that are certified to use the right frequencies of light are typically $300 to $500. I have no way to verify the quality of the lights in that product, but the price looks wrong. Probably their light intensity is too low to be therapeutic.
     
  7. Murkey Thumb

    Murkey Thumb Experienced Member My Regimen

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    I don't think so, they are just using LEDs instead of lasers to produce the same light wavelengths.
     
  8. persistentone

    persistentone Established Member

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    The problem is power output. There is not enough power being delivered from that mask to excite a large number of brain neurons, all the way three inches below the skull. The good panels are delivering hundreds of watts of power across their delivery area.
     
  9. Murkey Thumb

    Murkey Thumb Experienced Member My Regimen

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    Ha ha, three inches below the skull that's a good one. I am fairly sure i don't want my brain frying just a little red light on my scalp 4 watt would be fine.
     
  10. persistentone

    persistentone Established Member

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    Believe it or not, some of the primary applications for red light are neurodegeneration, mood disorders, and neuroinflammation. These frequencies do penetrate the skull. The mechanism of action is that these frequencies are only absorbed by mitochondria, so the power of the light is transferred to energy production in tissues.

    In any case, my point would be to match the power output of the light to the studies you are trying to emulate. I have a hard time believing that such an underpowered light would have studies to back it up.
     
  11. Murkey Thumb

    Murkey Thumb Experienced Member My Regimen

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    I am aware of its anti depression uses as one of my friends has a light box for that very purpose. If these LED lights are used to penetrate the skin for anti ageing purposes then it follows that the scalp can also be stimulated by its rays. You don't really want too much heat which is often a problem with laser & lamp versions its benefits are more to do with the frequency and time period.
     
  12. persistentone

    persistentone Established Member

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    "Light boxes" for depression are something totally different. They treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) by introducing more visible blue light into the eye. This is typically associated with winter depression.

    Red light penetrates the skull and directly raises the energy level in mitochondria of your neurons. This is a completely different - and much much more powerful - effect. What matters for red light is not only the frequency, but the power output of the light.
     
    #12 persistentone, Jul 2, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019

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