Apple Cider Vinegar... part II | HairLossTalk Forums

Apple Cider Vinegar... part II

Discussion in 'Alternative Treatments' started by squeegee, Nov 19, 2010.

  1. squeegee

    squeegee Banned

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    OK.. trying to find why ACV can work for Hairloss and others health benefits.. IF you have nothing positive to add to this thread please just skip it.

    Research Article
    Apple Cider Vinegar Attenuates Lipid Profile in Normal and Diabetic Rats

    F. Shishehbor, A. Mansoori, A.R. Sarkaki, M.T. Jalali and S.M. Latifi

    ABSTRACT
    In this study, the effect of apple cider vinegar on Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and lipid profile in normal and diabetic rats was investigated. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats (300±30 g) by the intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg kg-1 of body weight). Both normal and diabetic animals were fed with standard animal food containing apple cider vinegar (6% w/w) for 4 weeks. Fasting blood glucose did not change, while HbA1c significantly decreased by apple cider vinegar in diabetic group (p<0.05). In normal rats fed with vinegar, significant reduction of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) (p<0.005) and significant increase of high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) levels (p<0.005) were observed. Apple cider vinegar also reduced serum triglyceride (TG) levels (p<0.005) and increased HDL-c (p<0.005) in diabetic animals. These results indicate that apple cider vinegar improved the serum lipid profile in normal and diabetic rats by decreasing serum TG, LDL-c and increasing serum HDL-c and may be of great value in managing the diabetic complications.

    http://scialert.net/fulltext/?doi=pjbs.2008.2634.2638

    Since apple cider vinegar is a liquid that contains a high acid content, the liquid should not be consumed before it is diluted with water or juice. The liquid can be sweetened to your preference by using honey or a sweetener.

    Apple cider vinegar can also be added to different dishes while cooking so that it can be safely consumed. An individual can use 2 tbsp. of apple cider vinegar, sweetened with 1 tbsp. of sugar or honey in an 8 oz. glass of juice or water; this beverage can be made and consumed several times throughout the day.

    The potassium in apple cider vinegar is cited as a natural blood thinner. This mineral is capable of breaking down fats and proteins that might otherwise cause one's blood to thicken. In artery health, the potassium allows for the easier passage of blood through the arteries and improves the circulatory processes.

    The breakdown of fats also lowers the amount of material in one's body the clogs that arteries in the first place. Potassium also softens the tissues that comprise the arteries therefore increasing their elasticity. Additional advantages include reduced issues with hypertension and a diminished risk of stroke or heart attack.

    The pectin and amino acids in apple cider vinegar are a natural defense against low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL). This form of cholesterol associated with a high risk of atherosclerosis and the development of atheromatous plaque; the plaque causes the arteries to become hard and to clog.

    Apple Cider Vinegar contains pectin that absorbs LDL cholesterol as well as fats so that the materials can be eliminated from the body through natural excretion processes. Amino acids also serve as oxidizers of LDL cholesterol.

    Consumption of apple cider vinegar lends to a natural increase in nitric oxide; this product stops the production of a hormone known as angiotensin II which forces vessels and arteries to become narrower and to constrict. This is another circulatory benefit identified in the consumption of this variant of vinegar.

    Malic and tartaric acids are in apple cider vinegar; these acids help break down different foods for improved digestion and therefore reduce the number of unnecessary fats in the body responsible for high cholesterol levels. These acids also ease circulatory processes, making the work of the arteries easier. The acids in apple cider vinegar also aid in minimizing your triglyceride levels.

    Vinegar supplementation lowers glucose and insulin responses and increases satiety after a bread meal in healthy subjects.

    Ostman E, Granfeldt Y, Persson L, Björck I.

    Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Department of Food Technology, Engineering and Nutrition, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Elin.Ostman@inl.ith.se
    Abstract

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential of acetic acid supplementation as a means of lowering the glycaemic index (GI) of a bread meal, and to evaluate the possible dose-response effect on postprandial glycaemia, insulinaemia and satiety.

    SUBJECTS AND SETTING: In all, 12 healthy volunteers participated and the tests were performed at Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Lund University, Sweden.

    INTERVENTION: Three levels of vinegar (18, 23 and 28 mmol acetic acid) were served with a portion of white wheat bread containing 50 g available carbohydrates as breakfast in randomized order after an overnight fast. Bread served without vinegar was used as a reference meal. Blood samples were taken during 120 min for analysis of glucose and insulin. Satiety was measured with a subjective rating scale.

    RESULTS: A significant dose-response relation was seen at 30 min for blood glucose and serum insulin responses; the higher the acetic acid level, the lower the metabolic responses. Furthermore, the rating of satiety was directly related to the acetic acid level. Compared with the reference meal, the highest level of vinegar significantly lowered the blood glucose response at 30 and 45 min, the insulin response at 15 and 30 min as well as increased the satiety score at 30, 90 and 120 min postprandially. The low and intermediate levels of vinegar also lowered the 30 min glucose and the 15 min insulin responses significantly compared with the reference meal. When GI and II (insulinaemic indices) were calculated using the 90 min incremental area, a significant lowering was found for the highest amount of acetic acid, although the corresponding values calculated at 120 min did not differ from the reference meal.

    CONCLUSION: Supplementation of a meal based on white wheat bread with vinegar reduced postprandial responses of blood glucose and insulin, and increased the subjective rating of satiety. There was an inverse dose-response relation between the level of acetic acid and glucose and insulin responses and a linear dose-response relation between acetic acid and satiety rating. The results indicate an interesting potential of fermented and pickled products containing acetic acid.


    Cardiovascular Effects
    Kondo and colleagues[30] reported a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (approximately 20 mm Hg) in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats fed a standard laboratory diet mixed with either vinegar or an acetic acid solution (approximately 0.86 mmol acetic acid/day for 6 weeks) as compared with SHR rats fed the same diet mixed with deionized water. These observed reductions in systolic blood pressure were associated with reductions in both plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentrations (35% to 40% and 15% to 25% reductions in renin activity and aldosterone concentrations, respectively, in the experimental vs control SHR rats). Others have reported that vinegar administration (approximately 0.57 mmol acetic acid, orally) inhibited the renin-angiotensin system in nonhypertensive Sprague-Dawley rats.[31]

    [...]

    Antitumor Activity
    In vitro, sugar cane vinegar (Kibizu) induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells,[36] and a traditional Japanese rice vinegar (Kurosu) inhibited the proliferation of human cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner.[37] An ethyl acetate extract of Kurosu added to drinking water (0.05% to 0.1% w/v) significantly inhibited the incidence (?60%) and multiplicity (?50%) of azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats when compared with the same markers in control animals.[38] In a separate trial, mice fed a rice-shochu vinegar-fortified feed (0.3% to 1.5% w/w) or control diet were inoculated with sarcoma 180 (group 1) or colon 38 (group 2) tumor cells (2 × 106 cells subcutaneously).[39] At 40 days post-inoculation, vinegar-fed mice in both experimental groups had significantly smaller tumor volumes when compared with their control counterparts. A prolonged life span due to tumor regression was also noted in the mice ingesting rice-shochu vinegar as compared with controls, and in vitro, the rice-shochu vinegar stimulated natural killer cell cytotoxic activity.[39]

    The antitumor factors in vinegar have not been identified. In the human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line Caco-2, acetate treatment, as well as treatment with the other short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) n-butyrate and propionate, significantly prolonged cell doubling time, promoted cell differentiation, and inhibited cell motility.[40] Because bacterial fermentation of dietary fiber in the colon yields the SCFA, the investigators concluded that the antineoplastic effects of dietary fiber may relate in part to the formation of SCFA. Others have also documented the antineoplastic effects of the SCFA in the colon, particularly n-butyrate.[41] Thus, because acetic acid in vinegar deprotonates in the stomach to form acetate ions, it may possess antitumor effects.

    Vinegars are also a dietary source of polyphenols,[6] compounds synthesized by plants to defend against oxidative stress. Ingestion of polyphenols in humans enhances in vivo antioxidant protection and reduces cancer risk.[42] Kurosu vinegar is particularly rich in phenolic compounds, and the in-vitro antioxidant activity of an ethyl acetate extract of Kurosu vinegar was similar to the antioxidant activity of alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) and significantly greater than the antioxidant activities of other vinegar extracts, including wine and apple vinegars.[43] Kurosu vinegar extracts also suppressed lipid peroxidation in mice treated topically with H2O2-generating chemicals.[43] Currently, much interest surrounds the role of dietary polyphenols, particularly from fruits, vegetables, wine, coffee, and chocolate, in the prevention of cancers as well as other conditions including cardiovascular disease[44]; perhaps vinegar can be added to this list of foods and its consumption evaluated for disease risk.

    Epidemiologic data, however, is scarce and unequivocal. A case-control study conducted in Linzhou, China, demonstrated that vinegar ingestion was associated with a decreased risk for esophageal cancer (OR: 0.37).[45] However, vinegar ingestion was associated with a 4.4-fold greater risk for bladder cancer in a case-control investigation in Serbia.[46]

    Blood Glucose Control

    [...]

    In healthy subjects, Ostman and colleagues[58] demonstrated that acetic acid had a dose-response effect on postprandial glycemia and insulinemia. Subjects consumed white bread (50 g carbohydrate) alone or with 3 portions of vinegar containing 1.1, 1.4, or 1.7 g acetic acid. At 30 minutes post-meal, blood glucose concentrations were significantly reduced by all concentrations of acetic acid as compared with the control value, and a negative linear relationship was calculated between blood glucose concentrations and the acetic acid content of the meal (r = ?0.47, P = .001). Subjects were also asked to rate feelings of hunger/satiety on a scale ranging from extreme hunger (?10) to extreme satiety (+10) before meal consumption and at 15-minute intervals after the meal. Bread consumption alone scored the lowest rating of satiety (calculated as area under the curve from time 0-120 minutes). Feelings of satiety increased when vinegar was ingested with the bread, and a linear relationship was observed between satiety and the acetic acid content of the test meals (r = 0.41, P = .004).[58]

    In a separate trial, healthy adult women consumed fewer total calories on days that vinegar was ingested at the morning meal.[50] In this trial, which used a blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover design, fasting participants consumed a test drink (placebo or vinegar) followed by the test meal composed of a buttered bagel and orange juice (87 g carbohydrate). Blood samples were collected for 1 hour after the meal. At the end of testing, participants were allowed to follow their normal activities and eating patterns the remainder of the day, but they were instructed to record food and beverage consumption until bedtime. Vinegar ingestion, as compared with placebo, reduced the 60-minute glucose response to the test meal (?54%, P < .05) and weakly affected later energy consumption (?200 kilocalories, P = .111). Regression analyses indicated that 60-minute glucose responses to test meals explained 11% to 16% of the variance in later energy consumption (P < .05).[50] Thus, vinegar may affect satiety by reducing the meal-time glycemic load. Of 20 studies published between 1977 and 1999, 16 demonstrated that low-glycemic index foods promoted postmeal satiety and/or reduced subsequent hunger.[59]

    It is not known how vinegar alters meal-induced glycemia, but several mechanisms have been proposed. Ogawa and colleagues examined the effects of acetic acid and other organic acids on disaccharidase activity in Caco-2 cells.[60] Acetic acid (5 mmol/L) suppressed sucrase, lactase, and maltase activities in concentration- and time-dependent manners as compared with control values, but the other organic acids (eg, citric, succinic, L-maric, and L-lactic acids) did not suppress enzyme activities. Because acetic acid treatment did not affect the de-novo synthesis of the sucrase-isomaltase complex at either the transcriptional or translational levels, the investigators concluded that the suppressive effect of acetic acid likely occurs during the posttranslational processing of the enzyme complex.[60] Of note, the lay literature has long proclaimed that vinegar interferes with starch digestion and should be avoided at meal times.[61]

    Several investigations examined whether delayed gastric emptying contributed to the antiglycemic effect of vinegar. Using noninvasive ultrasonography, Brighenti and colleagues[50] did not observe a difference in gastric emptying rates in healthy subjects consuming bread (50 g carbohydrate) in association with acetic acid (ie, vinegar) vs sodium acetate (ie, vinegar neutralized by the addition of sodium bicarbonate); however, a significant difference in post-meal glycemia was noted between treatments with the acetic acid treatment lowering glycemia by 31.4%. In a later study, Liljeberg and Bjorck[62] added paracetamol to the bread test meal to permit indirect measurement of the gastric emptying rate. Compared with reference values, postmeal serum glucose and paracetamol concentrations were reduced significantly when the test meal was consumed with vinegar. The results of this study should be carefully considered, however, because paracetamol levels in blood may be affected by food factors and other gastrointestinal events. In rats fed experimental diets containing the indigestible marker polyethylenglycol and varying concentrations of acetic acid (0, 4, 8, 16 g acetic acid/100 g diet), dietary acetic acid did not alter gastric emptying, the rate of food intake, or glucose absorption.[63]
     
  2. Hate2LoseIt

    Hate2LoseIt Established Member

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  3. Hoppi

    Hoppi Senior Member

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    I've decided to jump back on this one - I just got my proper Bragg's ACV in the mail with "the mother" and everything, and I want to use it as part of my gradually developing protocol to heal my digestive system! For the record, washing your mouth out with something alkaline or pH neutralizing (I use xylitol which I believe is fine) after ACV should protect your enamel from the acid. Ofc you could also use a straw or something but.. I prefer this method! ^^

    oh, EDIT - Sorry I also meant you do need to dilute it too or put it on food - don't just drink it neat as it's still harmful like that! I'm sure you all knew this by now though ^_^
     
  4. purecontrol

    purecontrol Established Member

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    Guys, this is a bad idea. There are far far better ways to increase insulin sensativity. You are going to end up making yourself acidic, guaranteed! When your pH drops down you are going to start causing new problems for your hair and cause more hair loss.

    pH is extremely important, immunity, oxidation, enzyme reaction, etc.

    What is your reason for choosing acetic acid over proper diet, training, sleeping?
     
  5. Hoppi

    Hoppi Senior Member

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    I believe it's commonly believed health benefits extend far, far further than lowering insulin resistance o_O
     
  6. fight_the_power

    fight_the_power New Member

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    I like the idea of using ACV. If you read about it, it offers a lot of health benefits, not just for hair.

    I wish people would have stopped dissing the original poster. Not everyone who starts a new treatment or supplement takes photos. I think ACV a good addition for people already using rogaine/propecia/ etc.
     
  7. Chris87

    Chris87 Established Member

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    I've only been involved in the hair loss community for a relatively short time (im 23 turning 24 in jan and i've been losing for about a year and a half)...but I can already sort of tell that these remedies seem to come and go every few months, yet no one ever proves dramatic results with them anywhere near what propecia/minoxidil can do.

    I really believe there is a denial/delusional condition that some of us hair loss guys go through where we find something, really want to believe it works, believe it actually IS working and then move on to the next thing after 2 months.

    I went through this period of denial when I first started losing my hair where I thought..hey I'll just pop hundreds of dollars worth of supplements, quit jerking off, brush my head with lasers, eat saw palmetto, and this will stop!! Of course..it didnt. I finally got real with myself and looked to treatments that were proven to work over and over again with plenty of proof of making a SIGNIFICANT long lasting difference.

    The funny thing is that a lot of these natural treatments claim to work within a month or two...yet no one ever posts pictures. They hop on here..claim its working..and then disappear or move onto the next thing. If powerful drugs like finasteride and minoxidil take 6 months-a year to see real results..do you REALLLLLYYYY think rubbing olive oil or vinegar or whatever on your head is going to produce results within a month?!!

    If these things REALLY did work THAT WELL, dont you think there would be a lot more proof in the form of pictures? Dont you think that there would be posts in the success stories forum of people using these treatments and having great results? Dont you think drug companies would be hopping on the bandwagon to try to make drugs using these things?

    Lets for one second stop being naive, be VERY real with ourselves..and ask... Why dont these things stick around for more than a few weeks at a time? Why hasnt anyone posted REAL SIGNIFICANT long term improvements from just these treatments alone? Why do people say they are starting these treatments and then you dont hear from them 2 weeks later?

    There ARE things that really work...and with those things (like minoxidil and finasteride) there is NO QUESTION that they work. If these natural remedies really worked there would be no question about it....the proof would be in the pics.

    Believe me..i'd rather take some natural remedy than take finasteride..so i'm all for natural remedies....but what i am not for is fooling myself into thinking that drinking my own piss, rubbing vinegar on my head, quitting jerking off, drinking 10 cups of green tea a day, taking fo ti, taking saw palmetto etc are going to stop my hair loss. In the end you just waste a ton of time..a ton of money..and you cause yourself more stress than its worth.
     
  8. Hoppi

    Hoppi Senior Member

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    I think some things just work for some people and not others. It's very, very clear to me that many things can cause male pattern baldness to occur (even if the very end result is the same - DHT kills follicle). But people often don't agree with me on that and that's fine :)
     
  9. Chris87

    Chris87 Established Member

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    well you said it yourself...end result is the same...its genetic (9 out of 10 times) and its caused by DHT....what blocks the formation of DHT? Finasteride and other anti-androgens. No amount of piss on your scalp or apple cider vinegar or olive oil or whatever is going to REALLY get rid of DHT in a manner that will stop your hair loss and regrow hair in the manner than finasteride and minoxidil will.

    If anyone can show me a natural treatment (with proof) that is as simple as using finasteride, and works as well as finasteride...i will GLADLY stop taking it now. I know that there is not one though, because people would be all over it...and im not going to waste anymore time (or money) popping 1000 supplements, rubbing random things from my kitchen cabinet on my head, running lasers over my scalp, quitting masturbating, etc.
     
  10. Hoppi

    Hoppi Senior Member

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    No no that's not what I meant. Just because a follicle is sensitive to DHT doesn't mean certain things can't "tip the balance". If the person uses steroids or drinks lots of green tea IMO they'll increase androgens, which makes hair loss more likely. Orgasming increases inflammation through prostaglandins. Low SHBG causes high free T leading to hair loss. And... I would imagine it probably is just possible to have PARTICULARLY bad genes, such as people who start balding in their teens (but who knows, maybe it's just low SHBG / high T). The current one I'm interested in is liver toxicity, and whether as I've been told it results in less DHT being removed from the blood (which would explain my situation very nicely). People need to understand that guys can have hormonal imbalances as well, and sex hormone levels affect hair loss.

    Now, one thing I still, still don't get is if and how follicles may "upregulate" during life. Does the number of receptors increase? Do the follicles simply wake up one day and decide to be sensitive (IMO this is not reflected in what I observe, but it could be true). Still lots to learn! :)
     
  11. purecontrol

    purecontrol Established Member

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    1) gentic are rulled by epi-genetics which change based on enviroment ie diet etc. So yes you can litterally change aspects like this of your DNA expression

    2) hair loss is not due to DHT, it is due to higher than normal sensativity of the AR (androgen receptors)
     
  12. purecontrol

    purecontrol Established Member

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    Think again, you are simply guess/hoping. Pick up pH strips and you will know for a fact.
     
  13. Chris87

    Chris87 Established Member

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    Well if you end up stopping your hair loss due to changing your diet and quitting masturbating...you let me know. Although things like that might even have a LITTLE effect (the masturbation thing i do not believe..but diet..ok sure) i believe in the big picture it is negligible. There are plenty of homeless guys who smoke crack, eat garbage and have full heads of hair. So in the end...genetics is going to win..DHT is going to win....you can have the healthiest liver in the world, have the best diet in the world..and youre still going to lose hair over time.

    not only that but..any treatment, natural or otherwise, is going to take at least 6 months before you can determine its effectiveness...you seem to hop around from natural treatment to natural treatment every other week...whats the point? Many of the "natural treatment" guys have this syndrome where they find out about something, think they've found a miracle, do it for 2 weeks and then find something else..all while convincing themselves that its working. 6 months is a long time in the hair loss game...do you really want to risk 6 months of losing more hair in order to see if dumping pee and vinegar on your head is going to stop it?
     
  14. Hoppi

    Hoppi Senior Member

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    This is what I thought before too but I'm not so sure anymore. Do you have proof?
     
  15. Brains Expel Hair

    Brains Expel Hair Established Member

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    Things that have been shown to outright change your genetic expression:
    Exercise (type and duration)
    Vitamins (most of them)
    Carb vs Fat intake (relative levels and types)
    Insulin and Leptin levels (although this is an extension of above)
    Meditation
    Your pregnant mother's diet
    Cellular Stress & Environmental Toxins

    #2 from purecontrol is related to how old people with full heads of hair still have plenty of DHT in their body. Additionally people with low levels of DHT also are capable of experiencing hair loss.
     
  16. Hoppi

    Hoppi Senior Member

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    That's not really proof though lol

    I mean, perhaps this gene (or genes) are expressed more or less depending on factors, I'm not sure. But I'm 99% sure that that's not the only factor that can cause male pattern baldness. That may be simply one of many models or pathways, and it would still be kinda cool to see some proof of it lol :)
     
  17. purecontrol

    purecontrol Established Member

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    To which one?

    epigenetics are 100% fact, it controls the expression of your DNA. I can litteral turn "genes" off.

    As for 2), people with male pattern baldness don't have "out of whack" DHT levels.

    My whole family is bald, I was going bald until I did something about it. And when I start doing stuff that I am not supposed to, I start to lose hair again, but if I do everything right again it grows back.
     
  18. Hoppi

    Hoppi Senior Member

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    Yes but what I'm saying is perhaps your "pathway" to male pattern baldness (whether epigenetic or not) is different to mine, and we BOTH have different pathways to a guy who is losing hair due to steroid use. Do you see my point? :)
     
  19. fight_the_power

    fight_the_power New Member

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    If you want to disapprove the ACV theory, the simple way to do this, is to buy a bottle of ACV (~5 dollars) drink a couple of tablespoons mixed in water every day for a 2-3 months then post your results.

    I don't understand all the arguing over whether this work or not. It's so inexpensive and easy to try. What is it going to hurt? Actually trying it consistently and reporting back, will make a stronger case for or against it then anything else.
     
  20. GeminiX

    GeminiX Senior Member

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    Because the burden of proof is with the person making the claims.

    If we were to follow your suggested approach we would be constantly trying every quack and crackpot theory posted on the internet instead of focussing on proven methods which have been repeatedly shown to be effective.

    The only exception to the burden of proof rule are religionists and homoeopaths who all pretty make it all up as they go along; Christians are similar to homoeopaths but with an older book and a lot more violence.
     

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