A new theory of the underlying cause of Hairloss

Loife

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Hi All,

I have a theory I haven't seen spoken about regarding the root cause of hairloss, I believe that from a number of conditions (low stomach acid, Hiatial hernia, stress, poor diet, SIBO, Candida) equates to the same end, which is our stomachs not being able to seal/digest in the correct manner. This in turn leads to one of the most underestimated conditions, trapped gas. This gas caused enters our system and what does a gas do in a system? it rises to the top, this right here along with the throat being the main passage from the stomach is why the horseshoe hairloss happens. As the hair on your back and sides of the head are fed from a separate supply back of the neck/head (see image below) rather than the superficial temporal artery in the throat. This trapped gas then pressurizes where it ends up in your scalp and causes low oxygen levels similar to the way valves work, pressure builds on one side making it impassible for new oxygen. At these low oxygen levels DHT is what male bodies covert Test into which eventually miniaturizes and kills the follicles and all the niceness we know goes along here.

I honestly believe there could be something to this theory and wanted to share it, now i'm sure a lot of people will rip it apart but it gives a real reason the the pattern of hairloss being caused because this gas rises to its highest points and becomes trapped/pressurizes, and the relationship between stress/diet can play but isn't essential as some people will just have higher stomach acid/better digestion than others and stomach acid declines as we age again accounting for older peoples hairloss etc plus is in keeping with the hormonal aspect we all know along with why male pattern baldness is associated so strongly with blood pressure.

Thanks for reading, I came to this theory as I have the itch/ quite bad hairloss, the only time i can "wash over the itch/inflammtion" is when I practice deep breathing using my diaphragm (which i believe helps to re pressurize the system), I also press onto my throat using 2 fingers either side of my adams apple to free this artery shown below and whilst concentrating on supplying oxygen to my head the itch is relieved, Zix also used Vit B6 which has oxyganative properties and I'm sure this is the underlying mechanism on why we get fucked by hairloss/inflammation itch.

1614867196874.png
 

DAVAT

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Have you had any results from this? Can you explain the Adams apple bit please?
 

nwreaper

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how do you explain the fact that when you transplant a miniaturizing hair it continues to thin over time even if you transplant it to a leg or arm.
 

Nostro300

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jamesbooker1975

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Hi All,

I have a theory I haven't seen spoken about regarding the root cause of hairloss, I believe that from a number of conditions (low stomach acid, Hiatial hernia, stress, poor diet, SIBO, Candida) equates to the same end, which is our stomachs not being able to seal/digest in the correct manner. This in turn leads to one of the most underestimated conditions, trapped gas. This gas caused enters our system and what does a gas do in a system? it rises to the top, this right here along with the throat being the main passage from the stomach is why the horseshoe hairloss happens. As the hair on your back and sides of the head are fed from a separate supply back of the neck/head (see image below) rather than the superficial temporal artery in the throat. This trapped gas then pressurizes where it ends up in your scalp and causes low oxygen levels similar to the way valves work, pressure builds on one side making it impassible for new oxygen. At these low oxygen levels DHT is what male bodies covert Test into which eventually miniaturizes and kills the follicles and all the niceness we know goes along here.

I honestly believe there could be something to this theory and wanted to share it, now i'm sure a lot of people will rip it apart but it gives a real reason the the pattern of hairloss being caused because this gas rises to its highest points and becomes trapped/pressurizes, and the relationship between stress/diet can play but isn't essential as some people will just have higher stomach acid/better digestion than others and stomach acid declines as we age again accounting for older peoples hairloss etc plus is in keeping with the hormonal aspect we all know along with why male pattern baldness is associated so strongly with blood pressure.

Thanks for reading, I came to this theory as I have the itch/ quite bad hairloss, the only time i can "wash over the itch/inflammtion" is when I practice deep breathing using my diaphragm (which i believe helps to re pressurize the system), I also press onto my throat using 2 fingers either side of my adams apple to free this artery shown below and whilst concentrating on supplying oxygen to my head the itch is relieved, Zix also used Vit B6 which has oxyganative properties and I'm sure this is the underlying mechanism on why we get fucked by hairloss/inflammation itch.

View attachment 158394
LOL
 

OtyMac

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how do you explain the fact that when you transplant a miniaturizing hair it continues to thin over time even if you transplant it to a leg or arm.

Even though the top of the balding scalp has less blood flow than the sides and back of the scalp it still has considerably more than the arm or leg. Weird too that there are very few hairs in either the arm or leg hair compared to the scalp too.

The top of the scalp although sufficient in blood is something like 2.5x less than non-balding controls. Blood flow to the leg area is something like 4x less than what the scalp receives.
I'm going off what transplant doctors are saying so the exact details are sketchy but in general that is what has been said.

If you think just a bit of blood flow loss to the scalp is OK then I refer you to this post: (100 OUT OF 100 with obstructed superior temporal artery had hairloss):
 
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BetaBoy

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Even though the top of the balding scalp has less blood flow than the sides and back of the scalp it still has considerably more than the arm or leg. Weird too that there are very few hairs in either the arm or leg hair compared to the scalp too.

The top of the scalp although sufficient in blood is something like 2.5x less than non-balding controls. Blood flow to the leg area is something like 4x less than what the scalp receives.
I'm going off what transplant doctors are saying so the exact details are sketchy but in general that is what has been said.

If you think just a bit of blood flow loss to the scalp is OK then I refer you to this post: (100 OUT OF 100 with obstructed superior temporal artery had hairloss):
Any reason why minoxidil is the only blood flow medication that causes hypertrichosis when there are more effective blood flow medications that have since super seeded it yet have no effect on hair follicles?

Also according to several medical sources hair loss is not a listed symptom of Temporal Arteritis (Giant Cell Arteritis), so I'm not sure where you got the idea that 100 out of 100 experience it.
 

BetaBoy

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Interesting fact: Other potassium channel openers also tend to cause hypertrichosis at least sometimes (e.g. pinacidil and diazoxide).

So it seems likely that potassium channels play some important role in the regulation of hair growth, but the details of what is going on here are still not understood very well.

Potassium Channel Conductance: A Mechanism Affecting Hair Growth both In Vitro and In Vivo - ScienceDirect
Not sure if pinacidil is actually used but yes to my surprise there are indeed some ATP-sensitive Potassium Channel openers that have the same reported hypertrichosis inducing side effects.

Read this on WebMD in the review section for Diazoxide and it mirrors my experience with oral Minoxidil bar the blood sugar stuff of course.
First, this medication is used to treat my daughter for Hyperinsulinism/Hyperammonianemia or HIHA GDH. This oral medication taste horrible to say the least and stays with you for about 45 minutes. This is the only medication that keeps her blood sugar levels in the correct range. There are many side affects, hair growth on arms, legs, forehead and back. Because of the after taste, her appetite is greatly diminished. She has been on this medication longer than she has been alive, otherwise she is a healthy happy toddler. With using Diazoxide we also need to check her blood sugar levels 6 to 8 times a day.
 

OtyMac

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This may have been discussed before, but I for one don't believe the bloodflow theory of why minoxidil works.

One reason is roughly what you mentioned (lots of other things increase / change blood flow but don't affect hair), another is that minoxidil stimulates even cultured hair follicles, see e.g. here:

Minoxidil stimulates mouse vibrissae follicles in organ culture - PubMed (nih.gov)

My best guess is that minoxidil interacts with some chemicals in the hair follicles something something, and through some kind of reaction beneficial growth factors are increased. Something like that.

Here is an interesting hypothesis:

Minoxidil-induced hair growth is mediated by adenosine in cultured dermal papilla cells: possible involvement of sulfonylurea receptor 2B as a target of minoxidil - PubMed (nih.gov)

I think minoxidil works topically different than what it does orally. Oral minoxidil can effect vascular stiffness while unless massive doses of topical minoxidil is used it probably won't do that.

minoxidil orally has been shown to work for "permanent" chemo damage while orally does not. They are two different animals and topical and oral may be synergistic.
 

OtyMac

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Any reason why minoxidil is the only blood flow medication that causes hypertrichosis when there are more effective blood flow medications that have since super seeded it yet have no effect on hair follicles?

Also according to several medical sources hair loss is not a listed symptom of Temporal Arteritis (Giant Cell Arteritis), so I'm not sure where you got the idea that 100 out of 100 experience it.

100 out of 100 is in the study...but you will have to click to get the full study not the abstract. 100 out of 100 grinds to dust the myth of loss of blood flow is "no big deal" in Androgenetic Alopecia.

Giant cell arteritis is different than an occluded superior temporal artery. Also, a 16 year old girl experienced frontal-bitemporal balding with a rare disease that blocks the STA.

I also put together a portfolio of pictures of those with giant cell arteritis which I think is distinctly different than male pattern baldness as only the temporal area and eyes are involved.






LOOK TO THE RIGHT AT ____JUVENILE___ temporal arteritis:



This is a picture of a 65 year old woman:


.

12 year old girl balding:



some links are links within links and tough to separate out but the main link will lead to all these I saw.


I would take that bet everyday 24/7/365 if a person has giant cell arteritis they will likely be balding in the temporal area AT A MINIMUM.
 
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BetaBoy

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I think minoxidil works topically different than what it does orally. Oral minoxidil can effect vascular stiffness while unless massive doses of topical minoxidil is used it probably won't do that.

minoxidil orally has been shown to work for "permanent" chemo damage while orally does not. They are two different animals and topical and oral may be synergistic.
If you applied minoxidil sulphate to your scalp you would feel the same systemic effects as oral minoxidil. The MoA of topical and oral is identical.
 

BetaBoy

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100 out of 100 is in the study...but you will have to click to get the full study not the abstract. 100 out of 100 grinds to dust the myth of loss of blood flow is "no big deal" in Androgenetic Alopecia.

Giant cell arteritis is different than an occluded superior temporal artery. Also, a 16 year old girl experienced frontal-bitemporal balding with a rare disease that blocks the STA.

Doesn't change the fact that the blood flow theory is a load of bollocks.
 

OtyMac

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Doesn't change the fact that the blood flow theory is a load of bollocks.

It completely shows the causal direction. The question used to be somewhat debatable but that got completely blown up in the malocclusion study which FIRMLY established the causal direction to be :

loss of blood flow > balding,
and NOT balding and loss of metabolic activity in the hair > blood flow to be minimized.

If that weren't enough the picture galleries in giant cell arteritis even more firmly establish the point above.

The loss of blood flow precedes the development of other diseases also and not specific by any means to Androgenetic Alopecia.
 

OtyMac

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If you applied minoxidil sulphate to your scalp you would feel the same systemic effects as oral minoxidil. The MoA of topical and oral is identical.

FALSE as proven here.

"The use of 5% topical minoxidil has been described in three case reports, all showing clinically unsatisfactory regrowth at 6 months."

HOWEVER, in her case the regrowth occurred with ORAL minoxidil.


Almost all drugs that have had dazzling hair growth come from oral administration or injection and likewise most that get tried topically turn out to be a dud.

Estrogens,IVIG injections, benoxaprofen, oral dexamethasone, spironolactone, finasteride/dutasteride, IL-17 inhibitors injection, etc.

Of that list the only one that will grow any hair topically is finasteride/dutasteride BECAUSE we are treating what loss of microcirculation does and that is crank up 5AR production which also happens in the prostate too with microcirculation problems.


On hairestorationnetwork there are many anecdotes of oral minoxidil. One guy I remember who tried topical minoxidil to no avail went on oral minoxidil and even several years later was still piling on the results. This does not sound like the topical minoxidil studies done by Olsen showing a peaking of results at about 1.5-2 years.
 
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BetaBoy

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FALSE as proven here.

"The use of 5% topical minoxidil has been described in three case reports, all showing clinically unsatisfactory regrowth at 6 months."

HOWEVER, in her case the regrowth occurred with ORAL minoxidil.


Almost all drugs that have had dazzling hair growth come from oral administration or injection and likewise most that get tried topically turn out to be a dud.

Estrogens,IVIG injections, benoxaprofen, oral dexamethasone, spironolactone, finasteride/dutasteride, IL-17 inhibitors injection, etc.

Of that list the only one that will grow any hair topically is finasteride/dutasteride BECAUSE we are treating what loss of microcirculation does and that is crank up 5AR production which also happens in the prostate too with microcirculation problems.


On hairestorationnetwork there are many anecdotes of oral minoxidil. One guy I remember who tried topical minoxidil to no avail went on oral minoxidil and even several years later was still piling on the results. This does not sound like the topical minoxidil studies done by Olsen showing a peaking of results at about 1.5-2 years.
All that proves is oral minoxidil is stronger than topical which is hardly a revelation…
 

BetaBoy

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It completely shows the causal direction. The question used to be somewhat debatable but that got completely blown up in the malocclusion study which FIRMLY established the causal direction to be :

loss of blood flow > balding,
and NOT balding and loss of metabolic activity in the hair > blood flow to be minimized.

If that weren't enough the picture galleries in giant cell arteritis even more firmly establish the point above.

The loss of blood flow precedes the development of other diseases also and not specific by any means to Androgenetic Alopecia.
no it doesn’t, if blood flow were the cause medications that increase bloodflow would reverse Androgenetic Alopecia, obviously this is not the case.
 

OtyMac

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no it doesn’t, if blood flow were the cause medications that increase bloodflow would reverse Androgenetic Alopecia, obviously this is not the case.

Right...those capillaries are damaged and if you believe Dr. Allan's hypothesis of chronic diseases that all end stage diseases end up with capillary problems that in essence become dysregulated and become their own organ.

This is why microneedling and minoxidil are a great combination because they rebuild the local capillaries. Those capillaries got bad BECAUSE OF vascular stiffness which damages them in all(?) diseases.

Yes...and oral estrogens increase microcirculation and yet are a dud topically..hmmm. Minoxidil is mostly a dud topical even in those with the SULT A1A enzyme because they do grow a few strands of hair. But, when they take oral minoxidil they become great responders, explain THAT paradox!

Here is Dr. Allan's work on how many diseases end up:
 

OtyMac

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no it doesn’t, if blood flow were the cause medications that increase bloodflow would reverse Androgenetic Alopecia, obviously this is not the case.

Actually, most of the medicines that do work have effects on the blood pressure and over time can reduce vascular stiffness. Remember the 80 year old guy who regrew hair after 6 years? A direct antiandrogen effect would have been noticed on the hair follicles waaaay before that. spironolactone is a dud topically and will not repair vascular stiffness all through out the body.

Hydralazine reported to regrow hair and so does verapamil. I think long term peripheral vasodilators would be effective in those who's capillary beds can still be repaired but it may take time as it did with the 80 year old guy.

You've really come against a large body of literature not only on hair loss but what continued vascular stiffness can do even in children it can cause hair loss.
 
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