3a-HSD (3alpha-hydroxysteroid reductase)

hairschmair

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I think you've all read the "give DHT a break" article by now (http://www.mesomorphosis.com/articles/arnold/dht.htm).

Not sure what the guy's qualifications are but he refers to this enzyme that exists in the muscles that doesn't allow DHT to have any effect.

Has anyone heard any attempts at using this information by any companies to create a topical DHT blocker?
 

Dave001

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hairschmair said:
I think you've all read the "give DHT a break" article by now (http://www.mesomorphosis.com/articles/arnold/dht.htm).

Not sure what the guy's qualifications are but he refers to this enzyme that exists in the muscles that doesn't allow DHT to have any effect.

Has anyone heard any attempts at using this information by any companies to create a topical DHT blocker?

I assume that you mean a topical 3a-HSD inhibitor. A "DHT blocker" sounds like an antiandrogen to me. It's kind of interesting that you're referencing that article, because in it he writes:

It is important to understand that even though testosterone is the active androgen in muscle, and DHT exhibits relatively little direct anabolic effects on muscle in men, DHT is still very important for the full performance enhancement effects from testosterone. What I specifically mean here are the effects of DHT on the central nervous system, which lead to increased neurological efficiency (strength), and increased resistance to psychological and physical stress - not to mention optimal sexual function and libido.

That's similar to what I had been saying in a different thread about the importance of DHT for optimal performance, which you were stubborn to believe.
 

hairschmair

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Don't be a naughty boy Dave!

Importance is a relative term and something that is unnoticeable by most people (read the many threads about finasteride and muscularity) for me does not qualify as important...

'Something' here refers to DHT's influence on physical performance. Not libido.

:p

Now, to get back on topic, I guess what we're looking for is NOT a topical 3a-HSD inhibitor but in fact something that introduces 3a-HSD to our scalp, if that is at all possible.

This is according to the following part of the article:

"In addition to this, any DHT that is formed, or that is already present in the blood and travels to the muscle, is quickly deactivated by an enzyme called 3alpha-hydroxysteroid reductase (3a-HSD)."

What do you think?
 

Dave001

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hairschmair said:
Don't be a naughty boy Dave!

Importance is a relative term and something that is unnoticeable by most people (read the many threads about finasteride and muscularity) for me does not qualify as important...

'Something' here refers to DHT's influence on physical performance.

:p

Yeah, it wasn't my intention to imply that no one should take finasteride. Its use is a personal choice and the risk/benefit ratio must be considered by the individual.

hairschmair said:
Now, to get back on topic, I guess what we're looking for is NOT a topical 3a-HSD inhibitor but in fact something that introduces 3a-HSD to our scalp, if that is at all possible.

[...]

Thoughts?

I'm not sure what relevance it has to the hair follicle, but it's a good question. The interaction of retinoids with various oxidoreductases is particularly interesting.

Here are some links that may be of interest you:

13-cis-retinoic acid competitively inhibits 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidation by retinol dehydrogenase RoDH-4: a mechanism for its anti-androgenic effects in sebaceous glands?

Cloning of the human RoDH-related short chain dehydrogenase gene and analysis of its structure.

5 alpha-reductase activity in the human hair follicle concentrates in the dermal papilla.

3 Alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in rat liver and skin.

Influence of medroxypregesteroneacetate on testosterone metabolism by cultured human fibroblasts: a model for drug-steroid interaction.
 

jsmith

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It is important to understand that even though testosterone is the active androgen in muscle, and DHT exhibits relatively little direct anabolic effects on muscle in men, DHT is still very important for the full performance enhancement effects from testosterone. What I specifically mean here are the effects of DHT on the central nervous system, which lead to increased neurological efficiency (strength), and increased resistance to psychological and physical stress - not to mention optimal sexual function and libido.

Dave, I'm really glad you are bringing everyone's attention to this. It really bothers me that a lot of people (and especially a lot of people on this forum) who advocate taking propecia make it seem that DHT has no useful role to play in the body. (As I mentioned in another post, a doctor that tried to get me to take propecia started off by giving me a whole spiel on how DHT was the cause of hairloss, excess body hair and high cholesterol, without having any positive effect.) I think for some people the benefits of propecia justify the risks but people should know that the risks are there.
 

hairschmair

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ok, back on topic:

Does anyone with a scientific have any insight on whether it would be feasible and/or safe to try to create a topical with this enzyme in it? Do you think it would be effective? It looks like it's being sold in white powder form (in one of the links above).

Has anyone heard of anyone trying anything like this?
 

hairschmair

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This needs to be moved to another section I think.

(how'd you like my BUMP excuse?)

http://www.physicalenhancement.com/stor ... cts_id=155

"Dihydrotestosterone is also very open to the 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, present in large amount in skeletal muscle tissue[v] . This works to rapidly deactivate DHT as it enters these cells by converting it to its metabolite (and precursor) 3-Alpha. This normally allows for poor androgen binding in muscle tissue, and a weak anabolic response."
 

HairCook

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So, did anyone try broccoli or even better pure Sulforaphane topical?
 

HairCook

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@Bearded Come on, I know you wanna do it ;)
 

stachu

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Interesting stuff...
 

Dennis Garber

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I always wondered why putting brocolli sprout on balding area, would not immediately fill in affected area. Problem solved, at least until lunchtime.
 

Dennis Garber

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So, did anyone try broccoli or even better pure Sulforaphane topical?


Brocolli sprouts are higher in sulforaphane. You cannot cook it. Chewing it releases enzyme. However gut needs certain bacteria to convert it. So, no benefit if you take antibotics. Possibly, probiotics will help with conversion. If you freeze it, the enzyme decays shortly after thaw. Sulforaphane concentrates in bladder. Thus mechanism for bladder cancer and prostate. Lowers dht like 50%, or is that the psa number.

During summer, tried growing brocolli sprouts, but only got maggots.

DHT blocker locally, never made sense to me. But maybe it works. You would need to try half of the head.
 
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