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  1. #1
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    Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    How many have there been that have come to nothing. But one day...

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/ar...g-bellies.html

  2. #2
    Senior Member Jacob's Avatar
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    I can just see someone from here doing it themselves....

    Interesting though

  3. #3
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    If anyone finds a link to the studies behind this article I'd love to see it. This is another "sounds too good to be true" articles.

  4. #4
    TravisB
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    Yeah, let's go for liposuction and after it tell them to inject it into scalp because you want more hair. It will be 2 in 1

    It's working on the mice so far, we don't know if this will work on humans.

    DAMN MICE! EVERYTHING WORKS ON THEM, I MEAN YOU CAN INJECT EVERY **** IN THEM AND THEY WILL GROW HAIR, I BET IF YOU INJECTED THEIR OWN PISS AND **** IN THEM, THEY WILL STILL GROW HAIR, BUT WE AS HUMANS ARE ****ED

    BTW I googled it and it seems like a completely new discovery (which is great), since all the pages are from today. Unfortunately it seems to be another of those "avalaiable in 5 (multiply by 5 at least :P) years" cures

    GrayMan, it seems that Yale University just discovered this, so the studies are yet to be done.

  5. #5
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    The role of non-aromatizable testosterone metabolite in metabolic pathways.
    Dušková M, Pospíšilová H.
    Source

    Institute of Endocrinology, Prague, Czech Republic. mduskova@endo.cz
    Abstract

    Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) originates via irreversible reduction of testosterone by catalytic activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme and it is demonstratively the most effective androgen. Androgens influence adipose tissue in men either directly by stimulation of the androgen receptor or indirectly, after aromatization, by acting at the estrogen receptor. DHT as a non-aromatizable androgen could be responsible for a male type fat distribution. The theory of non-aromatizable androgens as a potential cause of a male type obesity development has been studied intensively. However, physiological levels of DHT inhibit growth of mature adipocytes. In animal models, substitution of DHT in males after gonadectomy has a positive effect on body composition as a testosterone therapy. Thus, DHT within physiological range positively influences body composition. However, there are pathological conditions with an abundance of DHT, e.g. androgenic alopecia and benign prostatic hyperplasia. These diseases are considered as risk factors for development of metabolic syndrome or atherosclerosis. In obese people, DHT metabolism in adipose tissue is altered. Local abundance of non-aromatizable androgen has a negative effect on adipose tissue and it could be involved in pathogenesis of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Increased DHT levels, compared to physiological levels, have negative effect on development of cardiovascular diseases. Difference between the effect of physiological and increased level brings about certain paradox.


    Hair growth stimulated by conditioned medium of adipose-derived stem cells is enhanced by hypoxia: evidence of increased growth factor secretion.
    Park BS, Kim WS, Choi JS, Kim HK, Won JH, Ohkubo F, Fukuoka H.
    Source

    Leaders Clinic, Seoul, Korea.
    Abstract

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and their secretomes mediate diverse skin-regeneration effects, such as wound-healing and antioxidant protection, that are enhanced by hypoxia. We investigated the hair-growth-promoting effect of conditioned medium (CM) of ADSCs to determine if ADSCs and their secretomes regenerate hair and if hypoxia enhances hair regeneration. If so, we wanted to identify the factors responsible for hypoxia-enhanced hair-regeneration. We found that ADSC-CM administrated subcutaneously induced the anagen phase and increased hair regeneration in C(3)H/NeH mice. In addition, ADSC-CM increased the proliferation of human follicle dermal papilla cells (HFDPCs) and human epithelial keratinocytes (HEKs), which are derived from two major cell types present in hair follicles. We investigated the effect of hypoxia on ADSC function using the same animal model in which hypoxia increased hair regrowth. Forty-one growth factors in ADSC-CM from cells cultured under hypoxic or normoxic conditions were analyzed. The secretion of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, IGFBP-2, macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), M-CSF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta, and vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly increased by hypoxia, while the secretion of epithelial growth factor production was decreased. It is reasonable to conclude that ADSCs promote hair growth via a paracrine mechanism that is enhanced by hypoxia.


    Can J Physiol Pharmacol. 2011 Jun;89(6):383-91. Epub 2011 Jul 13.
    Subcutaneous adipose tissue metabolism and pharmacology: a new investigative technique.
    Martin E, Brassard P, Gagnon-Auger M, Yale P, Carpentier AC, Ardilouze JL.
    Source

    Diabetes and Metabolism Research Group, Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Sherbrooke University Hospital Centre, Sherbrooke, QC J1H 5N4, Canada.
    Abstract

    According to the Fick principle, any metabolic or hormonal exchange through a given tissue depends on the product of blood flow by arteriovenous difference. Because adipose tissue plays dual storage and endocrine roles, regulation of adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) is of pivotal importance. Monitoring ATBF in humans can be achieved through different methodologies, such as the (133)Xe washout technique, considered to be the "gold standard", as well as microdialysis and other methods that are not well validated as of yet. This report describes a new method, called "adipose tissue microinfusion" or "ATM", which simultaneously quantifies ATBF by combining the (133)Xe washout technique together with variations of ATBF induced by local infusion of vasoactive agents. The most appropriate site for ATM investigation is the subcutaneous adipose tissue of the anterior abdominal wall. This innovative method conveniently enables the direct comparison of the effects on ATBF of any vasoactive compound, drug, or hormone against a contralateral saline control. The ATM method improves the accuracy and feasibility of physiological and pharmacological studies on the regulation of ATBF in vivo in humans.

  6. #6
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob
    I can just see someone from here doing it themselves....

    Interesting though
    Where do we start?

  7. #7
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    Yale researchers have discovered the source of signals that trigger hair growth, an insight that may lead to new treatments for baldness. The researchers identified stem cells within the skin's fatty layer and showed that molecular signals from these cells were necessary to spur hair growth in mice, according to research published in the Sept. 2 issue of the journal Cell. "If we can get these fat cells in the skin to talk to the dormant stem cells at the base of hair follicles, we might be able to get hair to grow again," said Valerie Horsley, assistant professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology and senior author of the paper. [1] Injecting the growth factor into the skin of defective mice could trigger hair growth in 86% of follicles. Of course, the researchers will have to show that the cellular signaling involved in human baldness are the same as they are in mice. If they are, the findings could help scientists develop new treatments for hair loss. "If we can get these fat cells in the skin to talk to the dormant stem cells at the base of hair follicles, we might be able to get hair to grow again," Valerie Horsley, assistant professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology at Yale and a senior author of the paper, said in a statement. [2]

    Researchers have found certain molecular symptoms in the stem cells that can accelerate hair growth. Men posses the anatomical sacs with such cells in their head, but they are inactive, that is why they do not encourage hair growth. The researchers have found that these cells in the sacs lying under the skin need to be triggered to re-start their functioning of hair growth. As per Valerie Horsley, Assistant Professor of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology and lead author of the paper, "if we can get these fat cells in the skin to talk to the dormant stem cells at the base of hair follicles, we might be able to get hair to grow again". [3]

    The researchers found that the stem cell precursors to the fat cells found in the layer of fat beneath your skin were required for hair regeneration. They found that these cells were producing a growth factor known called PDGF, which they also identify as necessary for hair growth. "If we can get these fat cells in the skin to talk to the dormant stem cells at the base of hair follicles, we might be able to get hair to grow again," she said. [4]

    When hair growth begins, the fat layer expands, the Yale team explained. They found that hair regeneration in mice requires a type of stem cell (adipose precursor cells) involved in the creation of new skin fat cells. They also found that these cells produce molecules (platelet-derived growth factors) that are necessary to produce hair growth. [5] When hair growth begins, however, the layer expands in a process known as adipogenesis, wherein stem cell precursors to fat cells (sometimes called preadipocytes, adipose precursor cells, or lineage cells) differentiate into full-blown fat cells. The connection between hair health and the production of fat cells suggested to the researchers that the process of adipogenesis may point to the so-called "niche" of the stem cells found in hair follicles. (A tissue niche refers to the microenvironment in which stem cells are found and their activity regulated.) You can think of a tissue niche as an arena in which signals directing stem cell activity are propagated; to examine what role fat cells and their precursors might play in the process of hair regeneration, Horsely and her colleagues examined mice with known defects in their adipogenesis cycles. [4]

    Researchers at Yale University have found new clues to the causes of hair loss in the fatty skin cells of mice. Studying cells from the fatty layer, the researchers found that signals from these fat cells were needed to stimulate the stem cells at the base of hair follicles, which are dormant in baldness. These cells could help scientists identify how to treat hair loss in humans. [6] A CURE for baldness may be a step nearer following a scientific discovery that stem cells can tell hair it's time to grow. Baldies such as TV comic Harry Hill will be glad to learn that a team at Yale University in the United States have been working on the problem and have come up with encouraging results. They found that molecular signals from stem cells in the skin's fatty layer were necessary to spur hair growth in mice. [7]

    The study in mice may lead to better understanding and treatments to reverse baldness in humans. Researchers know that men with male pattern baldness still have the stem cells that are necessary for hair growth in their follicle roots, but the cells are dormant and can't spur growth. It's also been known that the hair follicle stem cells need signals from within the skin to grow hair. [2]

    Previous studies in men have shown that bald parts of the scalp had the same number of hair stem cells as hairy areas. Prof Valerie Horsley, from Yale University, said: "If we can get these fat cells in the skin to talk to the dormant stem cells at the base of hair follicles, we might be able to get hair to grow again." The study suggested the fat cells could have other functions involving stem cells such as tumour formation or healing wounds. [8] The Yale University team says it may be possible to use the findings to one day restart hair growth to reverse balding. They said there was a four-fold increase in the number of "precursor" fat cells in the skin around a hair follicle when it started to grow. They looked at defective mice which could not produce these fat cells. [8] In a series of experiments, researchers from Yale University in the United States looked at what triggers the hair growth. They found fat cells to be key, with immature fat cells producing chemical signals that 'wake up' dormant follicles, leading to the production of hair. Writing in the journal Cell, they describe how jabs of fat cells drawn from mouse bellies triggered the growth of new fur. [9]

    Yale researchers report that signals from stem cells in the fatty layer of the skin may trigger the growth of new hair. [2]

    Horsley's lab is trying to identify other signals produced by adipose precursor stem cells that may play a role in regulating hair growth. She also wants to know whether these same signals are required for human hair growth. Other authors from Yale are lead author Eric Festa, Jackie Fretz, Ryan Berry, Barbara Schmidt, Matthew Rodeheffer and Mark Horowitz. [10] "The fat cells are important for hair growth. If they're not there, the hair won't grow," said Valerie Horsley, the lead author of the study. Horsley said her team will now work on identifying the cells in humans that do the same thing. "We don't know for sure if it's a cure for baldness," she said. [6] A series of experiments were carried out on mice, suggesting that the hair stem cells were controlled by adipocyte cellulite, and that injecting a specific type of fat cell into an area of hair stimulated hair to grow in mice that were otherwise suffering from hair loss. The mice selected for the study were chosen because they could not produce the fat cells that the scientists had identified were necessary to stimulate hair growth, and were therefore suffering from varying degrees of hair loss. The experiments saw the scientists inject the adipocyte fat cells from healthy mice into the defective mice, who could not produce the cells because they were in a dormant phase. [11]

    Bernstein noted that the study's findings don't address genetic hair loss, in which a hormone called DHT causes hair follicles to shrink. Horsley said the fat cells she studied are not only linked to baldness. They also could help scientists understand how wounds heal or how skin tumors grow. "We're trying to find out more about these fat cells. We're trying to understand who they're talking to in the skin," Horsley said. "It's very exciting because we really knew nothing about the fat in the skin. [6]

    Men with male pattern baldness still have stem cells in follicle roots but these stem cells lose the ability to jump-start hair regeneration. Scientists have known that these follicle stem cells need signals from within the skin to grow hair, but the source of those signals has been unclear. [1] Molecular signals travel within and between cells, passing on information that keeps your body from from developing diseases, chemical imbalances, fatal maladies. and baldness. It turns out that male pattern baldness occurs when the stem cells responsible for triggering hair regeneration simply stop receiving certain signals from within your scalp that tell hair to grow. Now, a team of scientists think they may have found the source of these missing signals -- a discovery that may herald new treatments for baldness. [4]

    Functional analysis of adipocyte lineage cells in mice with defects in adipogenesis and in transplantation experiments revealed that immature adipocyte cells are necessary and sufficient to drive follicular stem cell activation we implicate PDGF signals produced by immature intradermal adipocyte lineage cells in controlling hair regeneration. These data define active roles for intradermal adipocytes in the regulation of the skin tissue microenvironment. [4]

    The research, which was published in the Cell Journal last month, shows that adipocyte lineage cells contribute significantly to the skin stem cell process that drives the hair cycling process. [11]

    The laboratory studies conducted on the mice concluded that a four-fold increase in the adipocyte cells was necessary to trigger the process of stimulating the hair follicle was sufficient to trigger the growth process. [11] The first signs of hair re-growth were reported to have taken place after two weeks and the results also showed that the process could kick-start the re-growth process in approximately 85 percent of all hair follicles. Research into why this process took place discovered that the precursor fat cells were producing a platelet-derived growth factor at around 100 times the level of the surrounding dormant cells. [11] Two weeks later, hair follicles had started to grow. They showed that precursor fat cells were producing a chemical - a platelet-derived growth factor - at 100 times the level of surrounding cells. [8] The researchers also found that the precursor fat cells were producing a platelet-derived growth factor -- at 100 times the level of surrounding cells -- that appeared to be kick-starting the follicles to grow hair. [2]

    The researchers have observed that the human scalp undergoes a process of adipogenesis in which the fat tends to contract as the hair becomes lifeless, but with the growth of new hair, the fat in the scalp tends to grow wide. The researchers have also discovered that these cells generate platelet derived growth factors (PDGF) which triggers the hair growth on the scalp. [3] Injecting a type of fat cell stimulated hair growth in mice which otherwise struggled to grow hair. [8] The jab would use fat cells from the tummy to pep up hair growth on the scalp. [9]

    A team of researchers at Yale University led by Dr. Valerie Horsley noticed that when hair dies off, the fat cells in that layer shrink away, causing the thickness of your scalp to decrease. [4] A team of scientists at the University of Yale has pin-pointed fat cells in the skin as being a key factor to triggering the balding process. [11]



    Injecting the growth factor into the skin of defective mice could kick-start growth in 86% of follicles. The study proposed: "That precursor cells secrete platelet-derived growth factor to promote hair growth." [8] Studies show transplantation of stem cells promotes hair growth and you notice hair thinning that latter leads to complete baldness. [12] If we replace the dead cells on the scalp with new ones through stem cell therapy then the bald spot can be transformed into an area full of hair. This is the basic premise of stem cell therapy for treating baldness. [12] Within four weeks, the stem cells make new hair follicles that produce new hair shafts. [12]

    Experiments on mice, reported in the journal Cell, suggested hair stem cells were controlled by fat. [8] Functional analysis of adipocyte lineage cells in mice with defects in adipogenesis and in transplantation experiments revealed that intradermal adipocyte lineage cells are necessary and sufficient to drive follicular stem cell activation. [1] We implicate PDGF expression by immature adipocyte cells in the regulation of follicular stem cell activity. These data highlight adipogenic cells as skin niche cells that positively regulate skin stem cell activity, and suggest that adipocyte lineage cells may alter epithelial stem cell function clinically. [1] The cells that compose the epithelial stem cell niche for skin homeostasis and regeneration are not well defined. We identify adipose precursor cells within the skin and demonstrate that their dynamic regeneration parallels the activation of skin stem cells. [1]

    Stem cells extracted from the feotuses can help in treating the condition of baldness, reveals study conducted researchers from the Yale. [3]

    Researchers say there may be a market for combining the taking of cells with a full liposuction. This could then be marketed as a two-in-one rejuvenation treatment for men and women to slim down and grow hair back. [9] On the scalp dead cells don't grow hair and the area becomes bare, which we call baldness. [12]

    The researchers are now 'very close' to homing in on the key cells in humans leading to the prospect of the chemical-making cells being removed from the stomach region and injected into the scalp. Other possibilities include creams or lotions that contain the hair-triggering chemicals and can be rubbed on to the scalp, said researcher Valerie Horsley. It may even be the case that one treatment would work for years. [9] Professor Horsley's team now wants to know whether these same signals are required for human hair growth. They are also trying to identify other signals that may play a role in regulating hair growth. [7] Scientists are trying to determine whether the signals that promote hair growth in mice are the same needed to produce hair growth in humans. [5]

    When hair growth begins, the fat layer expands in a process called adipogenesis. [10]

    Horsley's team observed that when hair dies, the layer of fat in the scalp that comprises most of the skin's thickness shrinks. [10]

  8. #8
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon


  9. #9
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon

    Evidence That Vasculogenesis or Angiogenesis Regulates Adipogenesis

    Several diverse lines of evidence indicate that blood vessels or blood vessel development may influence adipocytes or adipogenesis (Table 2 ). During fetal development, arteriolar differentiation precedes adipocyte development and differentiation of blood vessel extracellular matrix (ECM) precedes differentiation of adipocyte ECM (Crandall et al., 1996; Table 2 ). Possibly, differentiated blood vessels may induce or enhance preadipocyte spreading and migration during adipogenesis (Hausman et al., 1996 ). During postnatal development, VEGF expression and resulting angiogenesis may augment or precipitate adipogenesis in white and brown adipose tissue (Table 2 ). And, studies of knockout mice indicate that extracellular proteolysis may regulate adipose tissue angiogenesis and adipocyte development (Table 2 ). Finally, treatment of mice with antiangiogenic factors decreased fat pad weights by 12 to 22% and decreased body weights in a dose-dependent and reversible manner (Rupnick et al., 2002 ; Table 2 ). Further studies are necessary to establish the nature of the influence of antiangiogenic factors on adipose tissue development."

  10. #10
    Senior Member waynakyo's Avatar
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    Re: Yet another so called 'cure' coming soon


    "Prof Valerie Horsley, from Yale University, said: "If we can get these fat cells in the skin to talk to the dormant stem cells at the base of hair follicles, we might be able to get hair to grow again."


    They repeated that sentence like 10 times ! enough with simple aphorisms. How do you make them talk to each other ? That is the question.
    I am not too positive about this, i would like to see hear what george Costarletis thinks about this.
    Some kind of happiness is my measured out in grafts.

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