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Thread: Joey's story

  1. #1

    Joey's story

    Hey guys, the brief story is as follow: started to notice rapid hair loss about november last year - went to two dermatologists who said it was TE because of major surgery earlier in the year and it should go away.

    It sort of got better for a while, then starting shedding again and went to a dermo a couple months ago, said still thought it was TE/CTE but go on rogaine if worried to try to kick-start it.

    Anyway I am beginning to disagree so I've been on rogaine foam for 2 weeks and finasteride 1.25mg(fincar/4) every day for the past week and niz 3 times per week.

    The only problem is I have started to get sore eyes/bags under eyes which i THINK is from the rogaine foam - could be in my head though - could it be that i am applying to a wet scalp at times and it absorbs too much? any tips?

    anyway here are some recent photos:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2

    Re: Joey's story

    Quote Originally Posted by joeydundee
    Hey guys, the brief story is as follow: started to notice rapid hair loss about november last year - went to two dermatologists who said it was TE because of major surgery earlier in the year and it should go away.

    It sort of got better for a while, then starting shedding again and went to a dermo a couple months ago, said still thought it was TE/CTE but go on rogaine if worried to try to kick-start it.

    Anyway I am beginning to disagree so I've been on rogaine foam for 2 weeks and finasteride 1.25mg(fincar/4) every day for the past week and niz 3 times per week.

    The only problem is I have started to get sore eyes/bags under eyes which i THINK is from the rogaine foam - could be in my head though - could it be that i am applying to a wet scalp at times and it absorbs too much? any tips?

    anyway here are some recent photos:
    looks like typical MPB to me..
    you can do some bloodwork to make it absolutely sure.
    sore eye is sign of Rogaine side.. but you can lower the dose, use it every other day..don't you have any side with fin?

  3. #3

    Re: Joey's story

    Thanks for the reply mate.
    No sides from fin as yet, but its only been a week fingers crossed. If its only slight loss of libido or whatever I can probably deal as I have that in spades.

    As for the rogaine - I might see how I go and might reduce to 1x day if doesnt get any better.

    do you think fin by itself would work or do you think i am too far gone?

    do people usually get sore eyes as well, or just bags/dark - as mine are actually sore, watery etc so wondeirng if from something else.

    and yeah im pretty sure MPB too, but might go back to dermo to get tested properly in a month or so for peace of mind.

    also what norwood would you say i am on the hairline? cheers

  4. #4
    Junior Member
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    May 2011
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    22

    Re: Joey's story

    ]Telogen Effluvium

    Telogen effluvium (TE) is probably the second most common form of hair loss dermatologists see. It is a poorly defined condition; very little research has been done to understand TE. In essence though, TE happens when there is a change in the number of hair follicles growing hair. If the number of hair follicles producing hair drops significantly for any reason during the resting, or telogen phase, there will be a significant increase in dormant, telogen stage hair follicles. The result is shedding, or TE hair loss.

    TE appears as a diffuse thinning of hair on the scalp, which may not be even all over. It can be a bit more severe in some areas of the scalp than others. Most often, the hair on top of the scalp thins more than it does at the sides and back of the scalp. There is usually no hair line recession, except in a few rare chronic cases.

    The shed hairs are typically telogen hairs, which can be recognized by a small bulb of keratin on the root end. Whether the keratinized lump is pigmented or unpigmented makes no difference; the hair fibers are still typical telogen hairs.

    People with TE never completely lose all their scalp hair, but the hair can be noticeably thin in severe cases. While TE is often limited to the scalp, in more serious cases TE can affect other areas, like the eyebrows or pubic region.

    Whatever form of hair loss TE takes, it is fully reversible. The hair follicles are not permanently or irreversibly affected; there are just more hair follicles in a resting state than there should normally be.

    There are three basic ways TE can develop.

    1. There might be an environmental insult that "shocks" the growing hair follicles so much that they decide to go into a resting state for a while. This results in an increase in hair shedding and a diffuse thinning of hair on the scalp. This form of TE can develop rapidly and may be noticeable one or two months after receiving the shock. If the trigger is short lived, then the hair follicles will return to their growing state and start producing new hair fibers pretty quickly. This form of TE usually lasts less than six months and the affected individual has a normal scalp hair density again within a year.

    2. The second form of TE develops more slowly and persists longer. The hair follicles may not all suddenly shed their hair fibers and enter a resting telogen state. Rather, the follicles may enter a resting state as they normally would, but instead of returning to a new anagen hair growing state after a month or two, they stay in their telogen state for a prolonged period of time.

    This results in a gradual accumulation of hair follicles in a telogen state and progressively fewer and fewer anagen hair follicles are left growing hair. In this form of TE, there may not be much noticeable hair shedding, but there will be a slow thinning of the scalp hair. This form of TE is more likely to occur in response to a persistent trigger factor.

    3. In a third type of TE, the hair follicles do not stay in a resting state but rather cycle through truncated growth cycles. When this happens, the individual experiences thin scalp hair and persistent shedding of short, thin hair fibers.

    Causes of Telogen Effluvium: Stress and Diet

    What are the trigger factors for TE? The short answer is many and varied. Classic short-term TE often happens to women soon after giving birth. Called postpartum alopecia, the sudden change in hormone levels at birth is such a shock to the hair follicles that they shut down for a while. There may be some significant hair shedding, but most women regrow their hair quickly.
    Similarly, vaccinations, crash dieting, physical trauma such as being in a car crash, and having surgery can sometimes be a shock to the system and a proportion of scalp hair follicles go into hibernation. As the environmental insult passes and the body recovers, the TE subsides and there is new hair growth.

    Some drugs may also induce TE, especially antidepressants. Often a switch to a different drug resolves the issue.

    More persistent insults can result in more persistent TE. For example, a chronic illness may lead to TE. Arguably, the two most common problems are chronic stress and diet deficiency. Many dermatologists believe chronic stress can gradually exert a negative effect on hair growth and lead to persistent TE. Research with animal models has provided evidence to back up this claim. There does indeed seem to be a link between stress, a change in hair follicle biochemistry, and more hair follicles entering a telogen resting state.

    Whether dietary problems are causing TE in North America is hotly argued among dermatologists. A lack of a mineral, vitamin, or essential amino acid can certainly cause TE, such as with people in third world countries where diets can be completely deficient in one or more nutrients. Animal experiments also provide supporting evidence.

    In first world countries the average diet is rarely completely deficient in a particular vitamin or mineral. However, some dermatologists claim that with a reduction in red meat intake and a preference for vegetarian diets, some individuals are not getting a balanced intake of all the nutrients required for good hair and overall body growth. In particular, there are claims that women may be deficient in their iron intake. Why women specifically? Because women lose iron at regular intervals as a result of menstruation.

    Some dermatologists believe that as we now eat less red meat, a key source of iron, some people are not eating enough iron and TE is the result. Other potential deficiencies of the modern North American diet -- such as a lack of zinc, amino acid L-lysine, or vitamins B6 and B12 -- have also been suggested to contribute to TE.

    When dietary deficiencies are suspected, supplements may be taken. However, supplements themselves can cause problems. Our bodies can only process so much iron each day. At high doses, iron is toxic and this can itself cause hair loss. At really high doses, iron supplements will cause death. Vitamin A supplements can also cause a TE reaction in some individuals, as excessive vitamin A can also be toxic.

    TE can occur on its own or as part of another disease. The early stages of androgenetic alopecia (male or female pattern baldness, AGA for short) are effectively TE. Early AGA is characterized by an increase in resting telogen hair follicles. Someone in the early stages of AGA may have up to 40% of their scalp hair follicles in telogen.

    TE can also be a symptom of other conditions, such as inflammatory conditions like alopecia areata. Hair follicles are particularly sensitive to thyroid hormones and about one third of individuals with a thyroid disorder have TE. Exposure to toxins can also cause TE as one of many symptoms.

    Treatments for Telogen Effluvium

    How TE is treated depends on what has activated it. For short-term TE that can be linked to a trigger like surgery, the best response is to sit tight and wait for the follicles to recover of their own accord.

    For persistent TE, if the causal factor can be isolated, then the best method is to remove it. For example, if stress is the problem, stress reduction is the long-term answer. If a dietary deficiency appears on a blood test, then supplements can work. A deficiency in thyroid hormones can be treated with hormone supplements.

    However, often a specific causal factor cannot be identified. If this is the case, there are few treatment options. Most dermatologists resort to prescribing minoxidil, a direct hair growth stimulator. Minoxidil can work well for some individuals with TE, but if the underlying cause is still present, then minoxidil must be continued to block redevelopment of TE. With removal of the trigger, minoxidil use can be stopped.

    Before leaving the subject of TE, here are a few words about natural hair shedding. Everyone sheds hair and you may see more hair shed at certain times of the year. Studies show that humans, at least in Northern Europe away from the equator, shed more hair in the fall and to a lesser extent in the spring.

    This temporary increase in the number of telogen hair follicles and shed hair is probably due to changes in hormones in response to changes in daylight exposure. Studies in mink and other mammals show that daylight exposure significantly alters prolactin levels and that prolactin has a significant effect on molting. As with mink and other mammals, humans probably have much the same molting response. Such hair loss should be temporary.

    __________________________________________________ ________________________
    The part about small keratin root (bulb) end
    My shed hairs have a very small bulb just bigger then the hair shaft itself. Are yours the same?

  5. #5

    Re: Joey's story

    Hey Kabooski - not exactly sure what you were trying to point out there about TE - I had read heaps about it when I first saw the dermos.

    I definitely had TE at some stage - but it may have now unmasked AGA who knows - but I was and still am losing telogen hairs (i.e. with bulbs) but now possibly with minituarized hairs?

    also i lose my eyebrows it seems and possibly pubic so perhaps i still have both at same time...

  6. #6

    Re: Joey's story

    Sorry mate, just saw the end of your reply - yes that's what they look like, but now of all shapes and sizes too.

  7. #7

    Re: Joey's story

    Quote Originally Posted by joeydundee
    Thanks for the reply mate.
    No sides from fin as yet, but its only been a week fingers crossed. If its only slight loss of libido or whatever I can probably deal as I have that in spades.

    As for the rogaine - I might see how I go and might reduce to 1x day if doesnt get any better.

    do you think fin by itself would work or do you think i am too far gone?

    do people usually get sore eyes as well, or just bags/dark - as mine are actually sore, watery etc so wondeirng if from something else.

    and yeah im pretty sure MPB too, but might go back to dermo to get tested properly in a month or so for peace of mind.

    also what norwood would you say i am on the hairline? cheers
    Blood test can also help you map your hormone level for future reference..Finastrade reduces 5alpha reductase II thereby inhibit dht production in your body upto 60~70% within 6months.good responders get result within 2~3months..Nevertheless, this drug can give you potential sexual sides like impotence, ED, watery semen, decrease in sperm count etc..I took fin over few months, which worked great, but gave me notorious sexual sides..it took over 3months to recover watery semen, but I'm still suffering ED and impotence..FYI, dht, 5alpha reductase also plays significant role in our body..just be careful..good luck.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    22

    Re: Joey's story

    setala how long after taking Fin did you start to see the manifestations of side effects?

    I've been on it for 7 days first 5 days at 0.5mg now 1mg.

  9. #9

    Re: Joey's story

    Within a month, I noticed drastic reduction in semen volume, also got huge fatigue despite me sleeping over 8hours a day..
    ED,impotence came thereafter.

  10. #10

    Re: Joey's story

    hey guys, any idea of what norwood i am as a baseline?

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