Hair Loss Treatments
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  1. #1

    Making my Own Shampoo, somewhat...

    Ok
    I purchased Revita not too long ago, and it seems to be doing great so far.
    However, being human, I want more.

    I was thinking of actually adding some curcumin, crushed Spiro, and ECGC in there

    I wanted some input on this if
    1) is it possible that this stuff will mix or should I have to consider using some PG/Alcohol
    2) has anyone made a similar shampoo with any results?

    Thanks guys!

  2. #2

    Re: Making my Own Shampoo, somewhat...

    Soy isoflavones mixed in with shampoo should help with sebum reduction and decrease androgen receptors based on a study in this thread.

    viewtopic.php?f=32&t=46360&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&hilit=Cu rcumin

  3. #3

    Re: Making my Own Shampoo, somewhat...

    Do you have a link to the paper showing benefits from topical soy isoflavones? The one human study I know used oral, not topical isoflavones.

    I think in the rodent studies they injected the isoflavones. At least that's what they did with capsaicin.

  4. #4

    Re: Making my Own Shampoo, somewhat...

    My mistake, it was oral and not topical the study that was done. The study was posted on the second page of the thread and sounds like the one you know already.

  5. #5

    Re: Making my Own Shampoo, somewhat...

    Ok I read through that link
    that study he posted is referring to topical use
    here it is

    Administration of capsaicin and isoflavone promotes hair growth by increasing insulin-like growth factor-I production in mice and in humans with alopecia

    Growth Horm IGF Res. 2007 Oct;17(5):408-15

    OBJECTIVE:
    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays an important role in hair growth. Capsaicin activates vanilloid receptor-1, thereby increasing the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from sensory neurons, and CGRP has been shown to increase IGF-I production.

    We recently reported that isoflavone, a phytoestrogen, increases production of CGRP by increasing its transcription in sensory neurons. These observations raise the possibility that administration of capsaicin and isoflavone might promote hair growth by increasing IGF-I production. In the present study, we examined this possibility in mice and humans with alopecia.


    DESIGN:
    Dermal IGF-I levels, immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I in the skin and hair regrowth were examined after capsaicin and isoflavone administration to wild-type (WT) mice and CGRP-knockout mice. Plasma levels of IGF-I and promotion of hair growth were evaluated in 48 volunteers with alopecia after administration of capsaicin and isoflavone for 5 months.


    RESULTS:
    Subcutaneous administration of capsaicin significantly increased dermal IGF-I levels at 30 min after administration in WT mice (p < 0.01), but not in CGRP-knockout mice. Dermal levels of IGF-I were significantly higher in WT mice administered capsaicin and isoflavone for 4 wks than in those administered capsaicin alone for 4 wks (p < 0.01) and in those administered neither of them (p < 0.01).

    Immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I at dermal papillae in hair follicles was increased in WT mice administered capsaicin and isoflavone and in those administered capsaicin alone at 4 wks. Hair regrowth was clearly more accelerated in WT mice administered capsaicin and isoflavone for 4 wks than in those administered capsaicin alone for 4 wks and in those administered neither of them.

    Plasma levels of IGF-I were significantly increased from baseline levels in 31 volunteers with alopecia at 5 months after oral administration of capsaicin (6 mg/day) and isoflavone (75 mg/day) (p < 0.01), while they were not increased in 17 volunteers with alopecia administered placebo.

    The number of volunteers with alopecia who showed promotion of hair growth at 5 months after administration was significantly higher among volunteers administered capsaicin and isoflavone (20/31: 64.5%) than among those administered placebo (2/17: 11.8%) (p < 0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    These observations strongly suggested that combined administration of capsaicin and isoflavone might increase IGF-I production in hair follicles in the skin, thereby promoting hair growth. Such effects of capsaicin and isoflavone might be mediated by sensory neuron activation in the skin. ---

    He then adds on the next page:
    "topically is how the last experiment I posted was done, and the first link about the 65-percent reduction in sebum with soy was done.................topically with soy isoflavones is probably much better than internal......it should reduce sebum by the fifth or sixth week pretty dramatically, especially if put on a warm, moist, hydrated skin...."

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