Hair Loss Treatments
Hair Loss & Alopecia Information, Support, and Treatments
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 41
  1. #1
    Senior Member misterE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    507

    A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    Insulin controls energy metabolism and increases the activity of IGF-1 by increasing its synthesis and by decreasing binding proteins, such as IGFBP-1. Both Insulin and IGF-1 stimulated anabolic processes based on the availability of energy and basic substrates, such as amino acids. Insulin and IGF-1 promote cancer by inhibiting apoptosis and by stimulating cell proliferation (Kaaks and Lukanova, 2001; Parr, 1999). In addition, insulin and IGF-1 promote the synthesis of sex hormones and inhibit the synthesis of Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (S.H.B.G.), which regulates the bio-availability of circulating sex hormones to tissues (Kaaks and Lukanova, 2001; Cordain et al 2003). Elevated levels of insulin and IGF-1 are thus ties to increased cancer experienced in the developed world (Giovannucci et al, 2004). Bartke et al (2003) and Parr (1999) have suggested that low levels of insulin may be an effective way of increasing longevity. Their conclusions are based on calorie restricted animals which have much reduced insulin and IGF-1 concentrations compared to normally fed shorter lived animals.

    McCarty (2000) suggested that simultaneous intake of animal protein and high-glycemic foods cause sharp raises in insulin that subsequently lead to Syndrome X, which is also associated with insulin resistance which leads to increased hyperinsulinmia, decreased IGFBP-1 and S.H.B.G. production and increased free serum IGF-1 (Hursting et al, 2003).

    It should be noted that although protein and high-glycemic foods are often identified as drivers of insulin and IGF-1 levels, Cordain et al (2002) reported that hunter-gather diets were very high in meat intake, but low in high glycemic carbohydrates. Possible explanations for this paradox are the consumption of low-fat animals, high intake of plants and vegetables, and relatively low total calorie intake in comparison to a high-energy expenditure. In addition high levels of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat and a higher omega-3/omega-6 ratio, antioxidants, fiber, vitamins and phytochemicals with low salt intake was favorable for cardio vascular disease.

    S.H.B.G. is an important regulator of plasma sex hormones and a sensitive marker of insulin resistance (gates et al, 1996). Low S.H.B.G. levels are tied to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, cancer, cardio vascular disease and mortality (Gates et al, 1996). Higher insulin levels reduce serum levels of S.H.B.G. (Lonning et al, 1995; Gates et al, 1996; Chen et al, 1990; Cordain et al, 2003), which as mentioned before are related to protein and high-glycemic carbs. Food types affect levels of S.H.B.G.; e.g., wheat lowers S.H.B.G. while vegetables appear to raise it. However, total food intake is negatively related to S.H.B.G. when it increases weight and B.M.I. because weight and B.M.I. are independently and negatively correlated with S.H.B.G.

    The level of IGFBP-1 controls the bioavailability of IGF-1. Wolk et al (2004) found low levels of IGFBP-1 correlate with increased insulin resistance, obesity and cardio vascular disease. They also found that the only significant positive association between IGFBP-1 and diet was attained when carb intake was increased. They also reported that a study of women vegans had 20-40% higher IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 levels compared to women on both vegetarian and meat diets.

    Another study (Giovannucci et al, 2004), found insulin secretion positively correlated with greater intakes of meat, dairy, refind carbs, saturated and trans fat and lower intakes of whole grain products and fiber. Since IGFBP-1 and insulin are inversely related, their findings indicate that reducing the consumption of animals; dairy, and sugar can increase IGFBP-1.

  2. #2
    Senior Member misterE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    507

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    According to the book: Hair & It's Disorders: Biology, Pathology & Management by Francisco M. Camacho, Valerie A. Randall, Vera H. Price....

    IGF-1 Inhibits catagen and telogen phases of the hair growth cycle, and promotes the phase switch back to anagen again. According to Francisco M. Camacho, Valerie A. Randall, Vera H. Price: "telogen is best viewed as the pre-regeneration state of the hair follicle, that is, whenever a hair follicle seeks to regenerate itself following severe damage, it enters catagen in order to deconstruct itself and become and telogen follicle again. In fact, rapid catagen introduction is the most effective way to return to the telogen state and to reconstruct a new fiber factory. In addition, the return to telogen by partial organ suicide at the extended period of hair growth may also be associated with the inherent risk of hair shaft production going awry.Thus re-entering the telogen state during cycling may be crucial for the prevention of malignant degeneration. The proposed telogen default sate, therefore, is more than a 'mere' resting state, and is clinically important, since it may be pharmaceutically targeted, for example by hair drugs that prolong anagen for the treatment of alopecia".

    http://books.google.com/books?id=iCqCdO ... en&f=false

  3. #3
    Senior Member dpdr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Brazil
    Age
    23
    Posts
    324

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    Reduce levels of insulin and increase IGF-1 would be a good solution for the body ?

  4. #4
    Senior Member misterE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    507

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    Quote Originally Posted by dpdr
    Reduce levels of insulin and increase IGF-1 would be a good solution for the body ?
    Insulin stimulates the production of IGF-1, hence the name "Insulin-like growth factor". Human Growth Hormone also known as H.G.H. stimulates IGF-1. The body makes the perfect amount of IGF-1, which also acts as feedback to the brain, controlling it's production and acting as a "check and balance". But when you eat foods that increase IGF-1, such as dairy, animal protein, and simple sugars, IGF-1 becomes unbalanced with the ratio of it's binding proteins (called IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, etc.), when this happens IGF-1 is what you call "bio-active" and is set "free" to circulate around in your body and promotes the synthesis of hormones and decreases the synthesis of S.H.B.G. (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin), which is devastating to the hair!

    Sugar and "simple" carbohydrates make the body produce insulin in order to metabolize your blood sugar! Insulin in return increases the production of bio-available IGF-1. It is best to avoid: drinking soda, eating candy, eating large amounts of bread and other "refined" grains.

    Animal protein directly increases IGF-1 due to the complex composition of the amino acids. Vegans have the lowest IGF-1 levels, followed by Vegetarians. Red meat such as beef cause a dramatic increase in IGF-1. But it is important to note that all meat/seafood increases IGF-1.

    But Dairy increases IGF-1 the most: milk, cheese, butter, yogurt, ice cream, and cream cheese. Milk's purpose is to increase IGF-1...plain and simple.

    Anyway, to answer your question...Not only would reducing levels of insulin be beneficial to the health of your hair and body, but also reducing foods that increase IGF-1 (Sugar, Animal Protein, Dairy).

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    8,671

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    The "complexity" of a carbohydrate has little or nothing to do with how much insulin and blood sugar it elicits. For example, a baked potato (a highly complex carb) has a higher glycemic index than sucrose (table sugar, a simple sugar).
    1) No, damnit, finasteride for hairloss was NOT an "accidental discovery".
    2) No, you do NOT have to use minoxidil and Retin-A at the same time.
    3) No, washing your skin does NOT make it produce more sebum.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    284

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan
    The "complexity" of a carbohydrate has little or nothing to do with how much insulin and blood sugar it elicits. For example, a baked potato (a highly complex carb) has a higher glycemic index than sucrose (table sugar, a simple sugar).

    That is 100% true, just look at maltodextrin. However a baked food is completely different from being raw. As a substance such a food is heated is begins to break down, a microwaved potato is even high glycimic than a baked one.

    Really the glycimic index is simply outdated and is being replaced by the insulin index.

    As for insuin sensativity, some foods and food combonations are better than other reguardless of their glycimic index.

    http://www.mendosa.com/insulin_index.htm

    Worst things you can do for you insulin sensativity

    #1 Lack of sleep, and more importantly the particular phases of sleep. If you aren't getting them all then you are getting full sleep.
    #2 Fat with high glycimic foods.
    #3 Processed fat and/or sugars ie high fructose corn syrup, hydrogenated oils
    #4 Lack of exercise (both aerobic and anearobic)
    #5 Stress, cortisol
    #6 Over feeding ie too much of any food such as too many simple carbs. The long and/or the more often your glucose levels are raised so goes your insulin and over time your insulin sensativity goes down. And then you start forming type II diabetes.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    8,671

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    Quote Originally Posted by purecontrol
    However a baked food is completely different from being raw. As a substance such a food is heated is begins to break down, a microwaved potato is even high glycimic than a baked one.
    What does it break down into?

    Quote Originally Posted by purecontrol
    Worst things you can do for you insulin sensativity

    #2 Fat with high glycimic foods.
    Do you deny that fat lowers the glycemic index of carbohydrates?
    1) No, damnit, finasteride for hairloss was NOT an "accidental discovery".
    2) No, you do NOT have to use minoxidil and Retin-A at the same time.
    3) No, washing your skin does NOT make it produce more sebum.

  8. #8
    Senior Member moxsom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    107

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    There are plenty of studies that show IGF-1 lengthens and strengthens the Dermal papilla, even in balding individuals. Also there is a study showing that people whom had significant regrowth on finasteride had higher levels of IGF-1 while those who had no growth or lost growth had low IGF-1 levels.

    I do agree that IGF-1 may stimulate androgens, but it has been shown many times it is very important in the hair cycle for inducing anagen.

  9. #9
    Senior Member misterE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    507

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bryan
    Quote Originally Posted by purecontrol
    However a baked food is completely different from being raw. As a substance such a food is heated is begins to break down, a microwaved potato is even high glycimic than a baked one.
    What does it break down into?

    Quote Originally Posted by purecontrol
    Worst things you can do for you insulin sensativity

    #2 Fat with high glycimic foods.
    Do you deny that fat lowers the glycemic index of carbohydrates?
    Fat will curve or "blunt" the spike or secretion of insulin, but it impairs the insulin that is released; keeping it in the blood longer. Trans fat (partially hydrogenated) and saturated-animal-fat are the big offenders. It also happens with monounsaturated fat but to a lesser extent, but polyunsaturated fat such as omega-3-fatty-acids actually decrease triglycerides and improve insulin sensitivity.

    One comment about potatoes, I use to think they were bad, along with all carbs and I went on a protein/fat based diet rich in meat and milk. I followed that for 8 months and my hair drastically shed and noticeably thinned. Finally I herd of Dr. John McDougal and began listening to his views.

    He claims that a low-fat/high-fiber starch based vegan diet rich in fruit and vegetables is the way to go. One thing that I remember him saying is: LOOK AROUND! You see people in Peru eating mainly potatoes, no atherosclerosis, no diabetes. You see people in China eating rice, no prostate cancer, no breast cancer...no baldness. But when you take a look at western-countries that are highly developed and the standard of living is great, the opposite is true, you have cancer, you have diabetes; you have children entering puberty faster and faster! Why?

    Dr. John McDougal has a theory about this. He claims it is because people eat like the richest people on earth, eating as much meat and dairy and deserts as they please, day in and day out. He claims that back in history, only the rich people ate a lot of meat and dairy and were lazy, because they could, while the peasants ate whole grain type foods (oats, potatoes, rice, beans) and vegetables and got more exercise. "If you look at old pictures of rich high class men what do you see?" John would ask. The answer is fat and bald.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Senior Member Bryan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Houston, TX USA
    Posts
    8,671

    Re: A Closer Look At: Insulin & IGF-1.

    You didn't answer my question about what a microwaved potato breaks down into.
    1) No, damnit, finasteride for hairloss was NOT an "accidental discovery".
    2) No, you do NOT have to use minoxidil and Retin-A at the same time.
    3) No, washing your skin does NOT make it produce more sebum.

Similar Threads

  1. A Closer Look At: SHBG & Metabolic Clearance.
    By misterE in forum New Research, Studies, and Technologies
    Replies: 112
    Last Post: March 15th, 2010, 02:32 PM
  2. A Closer Look At: B.P.H. & Prostate Cancer.
    By misterE in forum New Research, Studies, and Technologies
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: February 6th, 2010, 10:28 PM
  3. A Closer Look At: Ketoconazole & Nizoral.
    By misterE in forum New Research, Studies, and Technologies
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: December 1st, 2009, 06:13 PM
  4. A Closer Look At: Calcium & Magnesium.
    By misterE in forum New Research, Studies, and Technologies
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: October 1st, 2009, 08:45 PM
  5. High IGF-1 & M.P. Baldness
    By DammitLetMeIn in forum Men's General Hair Loss Discussions
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: February 26th, 2007, 09:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •