Hair Loss Treatments
Hair Loss & Alopecia Information, Support, and Treatments
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    341

    Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    Growth Horm IGF Res. 2008 Mar 3 [Epub ahead of print]

    Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone on dermal production of insulin-like growth factor-I in mice and on hair growth and skin elasticity in humans.

    Harada N, Okajima K, Narimatsu N, Kurihara H, Nakagata N.
    Department of Translational Medical Science Research, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kawasumi 1, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601, Japan.

    Sensory neurons release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on activation. We recently reported that topical application of capsaicin increases facial skin elasticity and promotes hair growth by increasing dermal insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) production through activation of sensory neurons in mice and humans. Raspberry ketone (RK), a major aromatic compound contained in red raspberries (Rubus idaeus), has a structure similar to that of capsaicin. Thus, it is possible that RK activates sensory neurons, thereby increasing skin elasticity and promoting hair growth by increasing dermal IGF-I production. In the present study, we examined this possibility in mice and humans. RK, at concentrations higher than 1muM, significantly increased CGRP release from dorsal root ganglion neurons (DRG) isolated from wild-type (WT) mice and this increase was completely reversed by capsazepine, an inhibitor of vanilloid receptor-1 activation. Topical application of 0.01% RK increased dermal IGF-I levels at 30min after application in WT mice, but not in CGRP-knockout mice. Topical application of 0.01% RK increased immunohistochemical expression of IGF-I at dermal papillae in hair follicles and promoted hair re-growth in WT mice at 4 weeks after the application. When applied topically to the scalp and facial skin, 0.01% RK promoted hair growth in 50.0% of humans with alopecia (n=10) at 5 months after application and increased cheek skin elasticity at 2 weeks after application in 5 females (p<0.04). These observations strongly suggest that RK might increase dermal IGF-I production through sensory neuron activation, thereby promoting hair growth and increasing skin elasticity.

    PMID: 18321745 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
    The trouble on these hair loss forums is that people are emotionally involved, and often just want to `believe' that a particular thing offers `hope'. This is why it is often easy for real science to be overlooked in MPB, but in the long term it is only `real' science that will provide the answers! -SFoote
    http://hair-less.blogspot.com/

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,810

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    Interesting. I wonder if one could just get the same benefits by eating the raspberries. Im pretty confident that they could...........


    All berries are very healthy. Blueberries are supposed to be the healthiest thing you can put in your mouth.

  3. #3

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    Thanks for the post bornthisway!
    1

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    341

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    Quote Originally Posted by michael barry
    Interesting. I wonder if one could just get the same benefits by eating the raspberries. Im pretty confident that they could...........


    All berries are very healthy. Blueberries are supposed to be the healthiest thing you can put in your mouth.
    Michael, I've consumed raspberry ketone capsules for periods long enough to realize if it positively affected my hair loss.. and it didn't.

    YW, Follically Challenged.
    The trouble on these hair loss forums is that people are emotionally involved, and often just want to `believe' that a particular thing offers `hope'. This is why it is often easy for real science to be overlooked in MPB, but in the long term it is only `real' science that will provide the answers! -SFoote
    http://hair-less.blogspot.com/

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    114

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    Quote Originally Posted by michael barry
    Interesting. I wonder if one could just get the same benefits by eating the raspberries. Im pretty confident that they could...........


    All berries are very healthy. Blueberries are supposed to be the healthiest thing you can put in your mouth.
    There's actually one food that has more antioxidants than blueberries, and that food would be red beans. (iirc)

    Despite the high antioxidant levels though, I wouldn't consider blueberries the healthiest food ever. In the top 10, maybe.
    .

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    341

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    These images from the study look very promising.. especially given how short the period of the study was.

    The trouble on these hair loss forums is that people are emotionally involved, and often just want to `believe' that a particular thing offers `hope'. This is why it is often easy for real science to be overlooked in MPB, but in the long term it is only `real' science that will provide the answers! -SFoote
    http://hair-less.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    287

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    the only cheap source I could find was:
    http://www.nutraplanet.com/product/nutr ... grams.html

    i'm not sure if it's enough.

    can anyone spoonfeed me on how to make this into a topical and how much to use?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    341

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    I was trying to upload the study to HLT but 200K is the max file size limit. Here is the Discussion portion.. btw, the only mention of a vehicle consisted of RK being dissolved in 10% Tween 20/10% ethanol (10%) and diluted with normal saline. Also, 0.01% had the most positive effects on IGF-I levels so that's the ideal concentration. (Polysorbate 20 = Tween 20)


    Discussion

    In the present study, we examined whether RK activates sensory neurons, thereby increasing CGRP release from sensory neurons isolated from WT mice. Since the structure of RK is quite similar to that of capsaicin, it is possible that RK activates sensory neurons by activating VR-1. Consistent with this hypothesis are observations
    in the present study demonstrating that RK, at concentrations higher than 1lM, increased CGRP release from DRG isolated from WT mice and that this increase was completely reversed by CPZ, an inhibitor of VR-1 activation.

    We previously reported that activation of sensory neurons by topical application of capsaicin increases dermal IGF-I production in WT mice [15], suggesting that topical application of RK might increase dermal
    IGF-I levels by activating sensory neurons in WT mice. Consistent with this hypothesis are observations in the present study showing that topical application of 0.005% and 0.01% RK increased dermal IGF-I levels in WT mice, but not in CGRP/mice at 30 min after
    topical application. Since skin fibroblasts have been shown to express the CGRP receptor [24] and are capable of producing IGF-I [8], our present observations suggest that topical application of 0.01% RK might increase dermal IGF-I levels in skin fibroblasts through activation of sensory neurons.

    Although RK increased CGRP release from DRG isolated from WT mice in a concentration dependent manner in vitro, RK, at concentrations higher than 0.05%, did not increase dermal IGF-I levels in these
    mice at 30 min after topical application. We previously
    reported that dermal IGF-I levels increased transiently after topical application of 0.01% capsaicin in WT mice [15]. Preliminary experiments showed that, although dermal IGF-I levels at 30 min after topical application of 0.05% and 0.1% capsaicin were significantly lower than those after topical application of 0.01% capsaicin, at 15 min after 0.05% and 0.1% capsaicin application,
    these levels were significantly higher than those after 0.01% capsaicin. These observations suggest that 0.05% and 0.1% RK might more strongly stimulate sensory neurons than 0.005% and 0.01% RK, thereby rapidly increasing dermal IGF-I levels with peak time points earlier than 30 min after topical application and
    that these increases might be followed by a rapid decrease due to depletion of CGRP from sensory neurons. Consistent with this hypothesis are observations made in the present study demonstrating that RK concentrations in the skin at 30 min after topical application of 0.1% RK were 10 times higher than thoseafter 0.01% RK application. Thus, excessive stimulation of sensory
    neurons by high concentrations of RK might explain why 0.01% RK increased dermal IGF-I levels, while neither 0.05% nor 0.1% RK had this effect 30 min after topical application as shown in the present study. This possibility should be further investigated.

    Topical application of 0.01% RK increased dermal IGF-I levels at 30min after application as shown in the present study. Production of IGF-I via capsaicin in vivo is more rapid than that occurring in response to CGRP in vitro [25], indicating that the former might
    not be mediated by the increase in transcription as in the latter, but rather by other unknown mechanism(s). Our previous report demonstrated that subcutaneous administration of capsaicin increased tissue levels of IGF-I and IGF-I mRNA in various organs including the skin at 30 min after administration in mice [14], raising the possibility that stimulation of sensory neurons by topical
    application of 0.01% RK might increase IGF-I production by increasing its transcription. This possibility should be examined in future experiments.

    In the present study, immunohistochemical expresion of IGF-I at dermal papillae in hair follicles is clearly increased in WT mice to which 0.01% RK had been topically applied for 4 weeks as shown in the present study. Consistent with these observations is a previous report demonstrating that IGF-I is produced by dermal papilla cells [7]. IGF-I is known to be an important growth factor in many biological systems [26] and it has also been shown to play a critical
    role in promoting hair growth [4]. Since IGF-I receptor mRNA was detected in keratinocytes [8], it is possible that IGF-I produced by dermal papilla cells acts on keratinocytes, thereby promoting hair growth through stimulation of the proliferation of keratinocytes in hair follicles [4]. Thus, it is possible that increase in IGF-I levels in hair follicles with topical application of 0.01% RK promotes hair growth in WT mice. Consistent with this hypothesis are our present observations demonstrating that hair re-growth was more marked
    in WT mice to which 0.01% RK had been topically applied for 4 weeks than in those receiving vehicles for 4 weeks.

    In contrast to our results, capsaicin has been shown to inhibit hair shaft elongation by inducing premature hair follicle regression via VR-1 stimulation of the outer root sheath keratinocytes in organ-cultured human scalp hair follicles [27]. However, in the present study, RK significantly increased IGF-I expression and promoted hair re-growth in mice. These observations suggest that RK might interact mainly with VR-1 on sensory neurons, thereby increasing IGF-I production in dermal papillae through an increase in CGRP release from sensory neurons in vivo.

    Topical application of 0.01% RK to the scalp for 5 months promoted hair growth in 5 of the 10 volunteers with alopecia in the present study. Consistent with these observations is our recent report demonstrating that administration of capsaicin and isoflavone promoted hair growth by increasing IGF-I production in humans with alopecia [19]. These observations raised the possibility that topical application of 0.01% RK to the scalp increases IGF-I production
    in hair follicles through activation of sensory neurons, thereby promoting hair growth in humans suffering from alopecia. These possibilities should be further examined in a large controlled study of human subjects with alopecia.

    We previously demonstrated that stimulation of sensory neurons increases tissue blood flow by increasing endothelial productions of nitric oxide and prostacyclin through activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-1, respectively [28]. Thus,it is possible that stimulation of sensory neurons by RK increases
    dermal blood flow, thereby contributing to the promotion of hair growth. Furthermore, capsaicin has been shown to down-regulate androgen receptor expression by prostate cancer cells [29]. Since androgen plays a critical role in the development of alopecia [30] and balding hair follicle dermal papilla cells contain higher levels of
    androgen receptors than those from non-balding scalp
    [31], RK, like capsaicin, might promote hair growth by decreasing androgen action through androgen receptor down-regulation on dermal papilla cells.

    CGRP has been shown to promote proliferation of human keratinocytes by increasing intracellular cAMP levels in vitro [32], suggesting that topical application of 0.01% RK might promote hair growth not only by increasing IGF-I production, but also by increasing CGRP release from sensory neurons in mice and
    humans with alopecia.

    IGF-I increases the production of collagen [10] and
    elastin [33] by skin fibroblasts and promotes proliferation of keratinocytes [34], suggesting that IGF-I produced by fibroblasts might act on these fibroblasts themselves as well as on keratinocytes, thereby promoting the productions of both collagen and elastin as well as proliferation, respectively. Patients with Laron syndrome showed skin morphological changes such as decreased thickness with decreased elastin contents [35]. The IGF-I receptor has been demonstrated in human skin biopsies [8]. These observations suggest that detrimental skin morphological changes observed in patients with Laron syndrome might be attributable to
    reduced production of IGF-I.

    Topical application of 0.01% RK to facial skin significantly increased cheek skin elasticity in5healthy female volunteers after 14 days of application(p< 0.04). Consistent with these observations is our previous report [15] demonstrating that topical application of 0.01% capsaicinto facial skin increased cheek skin elasticity in female
    volunteers. The important mechanical property that primarily maintains skin elasticity is attributable to the content andmolecular structure of collagen fibers embedded in the ground substance [36]. The sweat secretion rate has been found to be decreased in patients with GH deficiency who have low serum IGF-I levels [37]. Decreased ability to sweat results from the atrophy of eccrine sweat
    glands due to lack of stimulation by either GH or IGF-I, or both [38]. Since intra-epidermal elasticity is known to be associated with the presence of sweat [39], topical application of 0.01% RK might have increased sweat in the facial skin epidermis of the volunteers, thereby contributing to the increase in facial skin elasticity.

    Detrimental skin morphological changes such as decreases in skin thickness and collagen contents are observed in postmenopausal women [40] as well as in patients with Laron syndrome [35], raising the possibility that topical application of 0.01% RK might increase
    skin elasticity, probably by increasing dermal IGF-I contents in aged women.
    The trouble on these hair loss forums is that people are emotionally involved, and often just want to `believe' that a particular thing offers `hope'. This is why it is often easy for real science to be overlooked in MPB, but in the long term it is only `real' science that will provide the answers! -SFoote
    http://hair-less.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,810

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    If they increased the dosage to .5% or so they'd probably have better results. .1% isn't very much of it.


    Why in the hell cant green tea extract get tested in this way?

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    341

    Re: Effect of topical application of raspberry ketone (March 08)

    Quote Originally Posted by michael barry
    If they increased the dosage to .5% or so they'd probably have better results. .1% isn't very much of it.


    Why in the hell cant green tea extract get tested in this way?
    Thus, excessive stimulation of sensory neurons by high concentrations of RK might explain why 0.01% RK increased dermal IGF-I levels, while neither 0.05% nor 0.1% RK had this effect 30 min after topical application as shown in the present study.

    The trouble on these hair loss forums is that people are emotionally involved, and often just want to `believe' that a particular thing offers `hope'. This is why it is often easy for real science to be overlooked in MPB, but in the long term it is only `real' science that will provide the answers! -SFoote
    http://hair-less.blogspot.com/

Similar Threads

  1. Topical application question
    By Nick2007 in forum Men's General Hair Loss Discussions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: October 14th, 2007, 11:56 AM
  2. three topical application question
    By pinkfloyd7 in forum Men's General Hair Loss Discussions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: August 2nd, 2007, 03:13 AM
  3. Topical Application
    By Growin Back in forum Alternative Treatments
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: June 3rd, 2007, 04:58 PM
  4. Topical Creatine Application ???
    By Maxwell in forum Alternative Treatments
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: December 22nd, 2004, 02:44 PM
  5. Topical Application - how to get all the junk on
    By unicron73 in forum Men's General Hair Loss Discussions
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: November 11th, 2003, 02:38 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •