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  1. #1
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    Cholesterol Produces 5 Alpha Reductase = Baldness ??

    Higher Cholesterol Levels

    Men with this male pattern baldness had cholesterol levels five to six milligrams higher than the other men, or about 213.5 milligrams per deciliter. Their diastolic blood pressure was about two points higher, averaging 89.1 millimeters of mercury. The findings were independent of age, body fat, smoking and use of alcohol.

    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.h ... A966958260

    Cholesterol Accumulation
    Cholesterol which has been known to produce the enzyme 5 alpha reductase can also accumulate in the skin and scalp. When this cholesterol accumulation comes in contact with sunlight it produces the enzyme 5 alpha reductase directly in the scalp. Since the hair follicles contain testosterone, DHT is then produced in the skin and on the scalp. Since the ultimate goal is to block DHT from reaching the hair follicles, it is very important to keep cholesterol from accumulating in the scalp.

    http://www.add-hair.com/hair-loss-causes.htm

    Hair
    Cholesterol is the starting point in the long biochemical pathway that leads to the formation of 5-Alpha Reductase enzyme that converts Testosterone to Dihydrotestosterone - the substance implicated in Male Pattern Baldness:

    - Male Pattern Baldness sufferers are more likely to exhibit elevated total serum Cholesterol levels than those who are not afflicted with MPB.

    http://www.naturaltherapycenter.com/HEA ... /index.htm

  2. #2
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    Then explain why Dr Weil is bald.


    Or this fine fellow.
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  3. #3
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    Dr Weil recommends eating:

    Sources of saturated fats include butter, cream, cheese, and full-fat dairy products, unskinned chicken, fatty meats and products made with coconut and palm-kernel oils

    so that would pretty much ensure a DHT overload

  4. #4
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    No he doesn't.

    He specifically recommends REDUCING intake of saturated fats. Here is his diet suggestion regarding fat, and the web citation from which it came.

    On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, 600 calories can come from fat--that is, about 67 g. This should be in a ratio of 1:2:1 of saturated to monounsaturated to polyunsaturated fat.

    REDUCE your intake of saturated fat by eating less butter, cream, cheese and other full-fat dairy products, unskinned chicken, fatty meats and products made with coconut and palm-kernel oils.

    Use extra-virgin olive oil as a main cooking oil. If you want a neutral-tasting oil, use expeller-pressed organic canola oil. High-oleic versions of sunflower and safflower oil are also acceptable.
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 96,00.html

    You told a lie, DammitLetMeIn
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gardener
    No he doesn't.

    He specifically recommends REDUCING intake of saturated fats. Here is his diet suggestion regarding fat, and the web citation from which it came.

    On a 2,000-calorie-a-day diet, 600 calories can come from fat--that is, about 67 g. This should be in a ratio of 1:2:1 of saturated to monounsaturated to polyunsaturated fat.

    REDUCE your intake of saturated fat by eating less butter, cream, cheese and other full-fat dairy products, unskinned chicken, fatty meats and products made with coconut and palm-kernel oils.

    Use extra-virgin olive oil as a main cooking oil. If you want a neutral-tasting oil, use expeller-pressed organic canola oil. High-oleic versions of sunflower and safflower oil are also acceptable.
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/artic ... 96,00.html]

    You told a lie, DammitLetMeIn
    I didn't lie.

    if u read it. he says that how to REDUCE. he doesn't say not to eat those things.

    he lists them as sources of food.

  6. #6
    Senior Member The Gardener's Avatar
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    Here is what the article you cited in another thread as your "backup" actually says:

    Fat: Dr. Weil passes along the following tips about fats:

    For those who eat 2,000 calories a day, 600 should be from fat, about 67 grams, with no more than a fifth of that from saturated fats
    Sources of saturated fats include butter, cream, cheese, and full-fat dairy products, unskinned chicken, fatty meats and products made with coconut and palm-kernel oils
    Your main cooking oil should be extra-virgin olive oil; for neutral oil, go with expeller-pressed organic canola oil, or high-oleic versions of sunflower and safflower oil (avoid regular safflower and sunflower oils, corn oil, cottonseed oil and mixed vegetable oils)
    Never use margarine, vegetable shortening, or other partially hydrogenated fats (which contain trans fat); and read the labels of processed foods to avoid foods made with these products
    Remember that healthy fats are contained in avocados and nuts, especially walnuts, cashews, and almonds
    For omega-3 fatty acids, eat salmon, sardines, herring, black cod, hempseeds, flaxseeds and walnuts
    He's NOT telling people that eating saturated fats is good, he is telling them they should LIMIT saturated fats, and then goes on to write the list you cited NOT as a guide to what you should eat, but rather a guide to the kinds of fats you should be avoiding.

    Nice try at pulling a quote out of context.

    Resorting to distortion and untruth is pretty pathetic.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gardener
    Here is what the article you cited in another thread as your "backup" actually says:

    Fat: Dr. Weil passes along the following tips about fats:

    For those who eat 2,000 calories a day, 600 should be from fat, about 67 grams, with no more than a fifth of that from saturated fats
    Sources of saturated fats include butter, cream, cheese, and full-fat dairy products, unskinned chicken, fatty meats and products made with coconut and palm-kernel oils
    Your main cooking oil should be extra-virgin olive oil; for neutral oil, go with expeller-pressed organic canola oil, or high-oleic versions of sunflower and safflower oil (avoid regular safflower and sunflower oils, corn oil, cottonseed oil and mixed vegetable oils)
    Never use margarine, vegetable shortening, or other partially hydrogenated fats (which contain trans fat); and read the labels of processed foods to avoid foods made with these products
    Remember that healthy fats are contained in avocados and nuts, especially walnuts, cashews, and almonds
    For omega-3 fatty acids, eat salmon, sardines, herring, black cod, hempseeds, flaxseeds and walnuts
    He's NOT telling people that eating saturated fats is good, he is telling them they should LIMIT saturated fats, and then goes on to write the list you cited NOT as a guide to what you should eat, but rather a guide to the kinds of fats you should be avoiding.

    Nice try at pulling a quote out of context.

    Resorting to distortion and untruth is pretty pathetic.

    he eats cooked fats man:

    * DO select good-quality, natural cheeses (without dyes and additives). You can include them in your diet as long as you consider your overall intake of saturated fats. "You can have a certain amount of saturated fat in your diet," Weil says, "especially if you are eating primarily monounsaturated fats [for example, in olive oil or avocados] elsewhere, and it's in the context of a diet that is high in antioxidants from fresh fruits and vegetables. So you decide what you want to eat [that saturated fat] as. Do you want ice cream? Do you want to eat it as beef? My preference is to eat it as cheese."

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/ ... 74713/pg_3

  8. #8
    Senior Member The Gardener's Avatar
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    You're an intellectually dishonest weasel. You made a claim and I called you out on the rug for it.

    Now you are trying to sidestep the issue by changing the subject.

    You're a liar.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Gardener
    You're an intellectually dishonest weasel. You made a claim and I called you out on the rug for it.

    Now you are trying to sidestep the issue by changing the subject.

    You're a liar.
    smh at u catchin feelings. what the article said (whilst I read it wrong) is correct.

    those ARE sources of fat on his diet. whilst he advocates reducing them he also advocates 1/5 of 30% of his diet to be from this source.

  10. #10
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    Let me quote MORE from the same article you cited as backup...

    REDUCE your intake of saturated fat by eating less butter, cream, cheese and other full-fat dairy products, unskinned chicken, fatty meats and products made with coconut and palm-kernel oils.
    For those who eat 2,000 calories a day, 600 should be from fat, about 67 grams, with no more than a fifth of that from saturated fats
    He is NOT AT ALL recommending that people should, in effect, TRY to make sure they get in at least 1/5th of their fats in the form of saturate fats. He is saying that saturated fats are NOT good, and people should strive to keep them less than 1/5th of their total fat intake.

    Please tell me where he is "advocating" people to eat saturated fats?...
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